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Punk & New Wave 7” Collection Arrives at Amoeba Hollywood February 25

Posted by Amoebite, February 20, 2017 02:02pm | Post a Comment

Punk/New Wave Collection

We just acquired an incredible collection of punk and new wave 7" records here at Amoeba Hollywood. Starting Saturday, February 25th you'll get the chance to peruse around 1,000 choice pieces of collectible wax when this collection is rolled out onto our stage for your shopping pleasure. Expect to see lots of UK pressings and a handful of Japanese pressings; most of what you'll find is a first pressing or an early pressing. This is the good stuff, people!

Although most of these 45s fall under the punk or new wave genre headings, we've also got some pretty rad crust, powerpop, and hardcore releases. If you're lucky, you'll be able to snap up some coveted releases from The Nerves, Misfits, Germs, Buzzcocks, Sex Pistols, Ramones, The Plugz, Generation X, The Rotters, Avengers, and X-Ray Spex. We've also got plenty of stuff for fans of The Jam, The Zeros, 999, The Clash, Sham 69, Dead Kennedys, The Damned, Devo, Cockney Rejects, The B-52s, and the Dangerhouse label.

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Composer Carl Stone's Personal Record Collection For Sale at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Rick Frystak, October 3, 2014 01:01am | Post a Comment

Amoeba Hollywood has purchased one of the finest record collections that I have ever set eyes upon in my record store days (and that's about 13,870 days)!! Here we have obscure gems aplenty, many I've only seen perhaps once in my life, but here they are, side by side with records I've never ever seen before, and ones previously only legendary. In other words, a wonderful, rare collection!!!

Yes friends, I have negotiated a mutually satisfactory agreement that has allowed Amoeba to obtain the personal record collection of Mr. Carl Stone himself. Yes, THAT Carl Stone, composer and electronic sound artist extraordinaire, 21st-Century cultural icon, and truly a connoisseur of recorded sound in the left-of-center areas of many genres, and they are all here in the collection for sale in Amoeba's Hollywood store beginning the weekend of October 11 & 12: Avant Garde, Electronic, Musique Concrete, Experimental, Renaissance, Baroque, Medieval, Classical, New Music, World music, Jazz, No Wave, New Wave, Power Pop, Punk rock, Post-Punk, Industrial, and various "roots" musics.  All are original 1st pressings of mostly small, independent labels with loads of private pressings and imports.

Just, like, two words: mind blowing!!

This array of breathtaking LPs reflect Carl's usual pattern of being dead-center, ground zero, really at the apex of "what's happening" in music, never more true than in the pre-CD days of  this collection...a forward-thinking and quite wide-minded person's...one that doesn't come along very often. Don't think for a second that Professor Stone hasn't been feeding a constant, perhaps life-sustaining hunger to hear for himself the latest, most creatively interesting and challenging music (and in his case, even the sound of a big-piped sports car or machinery), from all over the world and across all genres. I presume he always has, and this collection of vinyl reveals that fact in every liner note and cover spine. Collectors like this are searchers, never quite satisfied with what is, what was, or even what "shall" be, barely trusting word of mouth and the writing on the walls. We collectors shake down anything that could offer that special chord combination, the emotional rush, the personal spirituality button pushed, or a memory bubbling over God-knows-how and why. Often these elusive platters make just a brief appearance in our airspace, only to become a faded memory, "Yeah, I saw that once at Amoeba…", or more likely, a 3 a.m.-tossing-and-turning-I'm-going-back-first-thing-in-the-morning-I-hope-it's-still-there angst-filled moment. Carl looked high, low, in, out and around for significant records. Carl got beaucoup promos sent to him. Carl had people hold things for him. Artists sent Carl their records out of the blue. Carl impulse-bought. Good record labels covered Carl. Carl special ordered records. Carl travelled the world and bought records as meals for his soul.

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One Album Wonders: The Mo-Dettes' The Story So Far

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 15, 2014 12:27pm | Post a Comment
The vinyl LP was introduced by Columbia Records in 1948 but the 45 inch single remained the primary market for the music industry until the dawn of the album era, which began in the mid-1960s. In the album era, for a variety of reasons, many fine musical acts released only one studio album, making them One Album Wonders.

*****

THE MO-DETTES - THE STORY SO FAR (1981) 



The Mo-dettes were a post-punk band originally comprised of June Miles-KingstonJane Crockford,Kate Korus/Korris (formerly of The Castrators and The Slits), and Ramona Carlier and who formed in 1979 in London. After having a hit with “White Mice,” they recorded their sole album, the optimistically-titledThe Story So Far. In May 1982, Sue Slack replaced Carlier on vocals and later in the year, the band split.

Italo-disco singer Savage is coming to Southern California

Posted by Eric Brightwell, April 23, 2014 11:01am | Post a Comment

On 6 June, 2014, '80s Italo legend Savage is performing for the first time in Southern California. He'll perform his greatest hits, including “Don't Cry Tonight,” “Only You,” “A Love Again,” “Fugitive,” “Radio,” and more in an event that will be DJed by BPM and hosted by singer TQ. Advance tickets are available here



Savage was born Roberto Zanetti was born in Massa, Italy on 28 November, 1956. Zanetti's musical education began when he was fourteen and he began taking piano lessons. Soon after he began playing keyboards in several bands including L'inchiesta, Fathima e i Pronipoti, I Vicini di Casa, andSangrià. 




In 1977, Zanetti formed Santarosa with Alberto Feri, Tiziana De Santis, Angelo Tedesco, and Paolo Zilio. In 1979 they had a his with Souvenir," which sold over 200,000 copies. The song was produced by singer “Zucchero” Fornaciari (né Adelmo Fornaciari)  and in 1980, he and Zanetti began a creative partnership. In 1983, the first fruit of their labor was also their first stab at dance music, "To Miami," attributed to Taxi and released by Florence-based Harmony Music and credited to Taxi




After the release of "To Miami," Zanetti returned with "Angelica" -- this time credited to Joey Moon




Zanetti's best known nom de disque, "Savage," was taken from the hero of 1930s American pulp magazines, Doc Savage. As Savage , Zanetti released his first single, “Don't CryTonight” in December of 1983, on Severo Lombardoni's Milan-based Discomagic Records -- an Italo-disco powerhouse who'd had by then already had hits with Gary Low, 'Lectric Workers, Jock Hattle and others. 






Unlike most Italo-disco efforts, "Don't Cry Tonight" was written, arranged, produced, and performed (both live and in videos) by the same person (who assumed another pseudonym, Robyx, for his production work – which included work with G.A.N.G., Kamillo, Claudio Mingardi, Saxophone, Lala, and others). “Don't Cry Tonight” was a massive success throughout much of Europe and Savage performed it on television programs like Mister Fantasy, Discoring, Pronto Raffaella, Azzuro, Festivalbar, and Tocata.




In 1984 Savage returned with “Only You” b/w “Turn Around,” which were included, along with “Radio,”Savage Only You “A Love Again,” “Fugitive,” “Tonight,” and his first single on the LP Tonight (1984-Discomagic).

In 1985, “Fugitive” appeared as the B-side on a remixed “A Love Again and “Time” was released as a single. A VHS titled Video LP was released which includes the videos for “Don't Cry Tonight,” “Only You,” and “Turn Around,” as well as a live club performance of “A Love Again,” “Only You,” “Radio,” “Fugitive,” and “Tonight.” Zanetti also collaborated, as Stargo, with Alberto Parodi and Andrea Tenerani, who released “Capsicum.” In 1985, “Only You” was also covered (as “Dans me yeux”) by French actress, Géraldine Danon


In 1986 Savage released “Celebrate” and “Love is Death” singles and toured in the Brazil, Japan, and the USA






In 1988 Savage released “So Close” and “I'm Loosing You,” both of which were indicative of the late '80s spread of House music to Europe.




In 1989 Savage released a single, “Good-Bye” and a cover of Sussex rockers Cutting Crew's “(I Just) Died in Your Arms” which dispensed with the unnecessary parenthesis and was simply retitled “I Just Died In Your Arms.” 



With Savage's transformation into a Eurohouse direction, his popularity increased in Eastern Europe, especially in Poland and the USSRIn August 1989 he played to thirty thousand people in the Sopot Festival, held in Katowice, Poland and performed for four consecutvie nights in Yerevan, Armenia. “Don't Leave Me” followed in 1990 on Euroenergy – a subsidiary of Discomagic. 




In the early 1990s, after more than a decade, Zanetti mostly retired from the stage, instead focusing his attentions on production. He purchased Casablanca Recordings and founded his own label, the Discomagic-distributed DWA - Dance-World Attack Records, which became the home to Alexia, Corona ("Rhythm of the Night"), Double You, and ICE MC


Zanetti continued to make music, employing a handful of aliases and collaborators. Teaming with Marco Bresciani and calling themselves Mali Carvalho, the duo released “Fuego.” He later teamed with Breciani as Soul Boy and released “Typical.” 





As Raimunda Navarro he released “Me Gusta,”” “No Lo Hago Por Dinero" b/w “Te Amo,” “Jungle Fever,” and “James Brown Has Sex.” As Rubix he released “The Party” and “Desiderio Latino.” As Pianonegro he released “Pianonegro.” As Wareband he released “Party Children” and “A Better Day.” As Scattt he released “Vocalize” and “Scat and Bebop.” And finally, as Humantronics, he released “The Sound of Afrika.” 

Whilst Zanetti was recording primarily under various other names, he occasionally released music as Savage, as was the case with 1993's "Something” b/w “Strangelove," the latter a cover of the hit by Basildon's finest, Depeche Mode. In 1994, as Savage, he once again embarked on a short tour, performing in Boston, Chicago, Miami, New York, and Brazil. He also released a new single, “Don't You Want Me?

In 1997, as E.Y.E., he released “Virtual Reality.” In 2005, as Creavibe he released “Wonderful Life.” That year he again returned to the stage for the first time since the birth of his daughter, Mathilde, in 2002. This time playing concerts in the Italy, Poland, Russia, Spain, and the USA. In Moscow he performed at three Autoradio Festivals, filmed at Olympic Stadium in front of an audience of more than 20,000. In October 2009 he released a new song, “Twothousandnine" with a video filmed at Southern California's Salton Sea. In 2010 he released a new album, Ten Years Ago (Klub80 Records).

 


While Savage has performed in Asia, Europe, and North and South America, his upcoming performance in Orange County will be the first time he's performed in Little Saigon. Whilst the audience behind the Orange Curtain won't rival the audience he's accustomed to behind the Iron Curtain, I think that he'll be pleasantly surprised by the ferocity and adoration of  the largely Vietnamese New Wave crowd.

Show Recap: Gary Numan at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Billy Gil, October 17, 2013 02:48pm | Post a Comment

There are some shows at Amoeba that get the staff tickled to pieces, and Gary Numan's show at Amoeba Hollywood Oct. 16 was one of them. Employees turned into starstruck kids when Numan showed up, looking vampiric in a black vest, red tie and dyed black hair.

He took the stage with his band to promote his recent release Splinter (Songs From a Broken Mind), which portrays a harder edge to the new-wave star. I was listening to it on the way to the store and found myself driving really aggressively along to the music (well, that and the Waze app was yelling at me from my phone, but that's another story).

He opened with Splinter's "I Am Dust," the industrial rage of which could have started those who showed up expecting the synthy sounds of "Cars." But the sizable crowd that showed up seemed to dig the new tunes, bobbing their heads along when the drums and distorted guitars came in hard and enjoying the new ride one of their musical heroes was taking them on.

By the second song, I felt a little hot from the noise, a sexy, noisy blend of guitar and synth more akin to Nine Inch Nails, Ministry and Smashing Pumpkins than Numan's early records. His gothy howl was occasionally muffled by the overdriven guitars. This wasn't a problem when he broke into a couple of classics—"Are Friends Electric?" and "Cars," which had everyone cheering and uncontrollably singing along.

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