Twelve Great Post-Rock / Psychedelic / Jazz / Avant-Garde / Experimental Albums That Are Perfect For Thinking About Life & Other Important Stuff

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 9, 2018 07:47pm | Post a Comment

By Michael Henning

This list is a bit eclectic musically, with a number of styles and genres represented. However, the albums here are held together by a common thread: they all contain music that is excellent for thinking. Sure, you can think while listening to pretty much anything, but these 2017 releases are guaranteed to take your mind on a journey through inner space. They will undoubtedly lead you to some interesting places, so check them all out and see where your mind goes... just close your eyes, relax, and float away on a cloud of sound.

Cornelius, Mellow Waves

12.  Cornelius - Mellow Waves (Warner Music Japan)

A triumphant return for this Japanese artist, his first new proper (non-soundtrack) album since 2006's Sensuous. As the title perhaps indicates, this new one finds him mellowing a bit, but his penchant for slightly skewed pop music is still here. Some odd time signatures lead to interesting places, and his distinctly Japanese sensibilities are on full display again. Overall, this is an enjoyable and pleasant ride through the universe of quirky electronic-tinged pop we are used to from him. Although it might not be his best record, it is a very strong effort, and it fares quite well when compared to his earlier masterpieces Fantasma and Point.
Do Make Say Think

11.  Do Make Say Think - Stubborn Persistent Illusions (Constellation)

Avant-Garde Music Collection Arrives at Amoeba Hollywood October 22

Posted by Amoebite, October 18, 2016 12:09pm | Post a Comment

Avant-Garde CD Sale

We are very excited to announce that we've acquired the amazing CD collection of LA Free Music Society member Juan Gomez! This one-of-a-kind collection will be on display and available for sale at Amoeba Hollywood starting Saturday, October 22nd. Juan's collection leans toward the catalog of mindfully experimental artists with classical influence, with many obscure releases and long out-of-print titles among the assemblage. It features over 700 pieces, including hard-to-find gems from artists such as Philip Glass and Olga Neuwirth, as well as labels Kairos, ECM New Series, Wergo, and Neos.

Avant-Garde Music Collection at Amoeba Hollywood

Los Angeles Free Music SocietyJuan Gomez, as an early adapter and member of the improvisational LAFMS collective, has always had an interest in contemporary music of all kinds. His taste for modernism also drew him into the musical landscape of 20th century avant-garde composers and thus inspired his interest in collecting their recordings early on. As a young man, the recordings he experienced at his local library of Arnold Schoenberg, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and John Cage helped to strongly influence his music buying tastes.

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Female Experimental Filmmakers: A Noncomprehensive A-Z

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 18, 2015 12:27pm | Post a Comment


There are almost as many types of experimental films as there are experimental filmmakers. Many of them come to film from different directions than conventional filmmakers -- weaving together psychology, painting, dance, poetry, literature, theater, sculpture, and other fields. This being Women's History Month, I thought I'd have a crack at compiling a list of some of the names with which I'm familiar. If you have additions you'd like me to insert, let me know in the comments. 


Amy Greenfield was born 8 July, 1950 in Boston. She is an originator of the cine-dance genre, her namefor her artistic intersection of experimental film and dance. In addition to film she's created holographic moving sculptures, live multimedia pieces, poetry, and video installations.


Bady Minck was born in Ettelbruck, Luxembourg. She studied sculpture at the Academy of Fine Arts and experimental film at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. Her debut, 1988's Der Mensch mit den modernen Nerven, was screened at the Cannes Film Festival in 1989. Minck today divides her time between Luxembourg and Vienna.

Composer Carl Stone's Personal Record Collection For Sale at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Rick Frystak, October 3, 2014 01:01am | Post a Comment

Carl Stone LP Collection

Amoeba Hollywood has purchased one of the finest record collections that I have ever set eyes upon in my record store days (and that's about 13,870 days)!! Here we have obscure gems aplenty, many I've only seen perhaps once in my life, but here they are, side by side with records I've never ever seen before, and ones previously only legendary. In other words, a wonderful, rare collection!!!

Yes friends, I have negotiated a mutually satisfactory agreement that has allowed Amoeba to obtain the personal record collection of Mr. Carl Stone himself. Yes, THAT Carl Stone, composer and electronic sound artist extraordinaire, 21st-Century cultural icon, and truly a connoisseur of recorded sound in the left-of-center areas of many genres, and they are all here in the collection for sale in Amoeba's Hollywood store beginning the weekend of October 11 & 12: Avant Garde, Electronic, Musique Concrete, Experimental, Renaissance, Baroque, Medieval, Classical, New Music, World music, Jazz, No Wave, New Wave, Power Pop, Punk rock, Post-Punk, Industrial, and various "roots" musics.  All are original 1st pressings of mostly small, independent labels with loads of private pressings and imports.

Just, like, two words: mind blowing!!

This array of breathtaking LPs reflect Carl's usual pattern of being dead-center, ground zero, really at the apex of "what's happening" in music, never more true than in the pre-CD days of  this collection...a forward-thinking and quite wide-minded person' that doesn't come along very often. Don't think for a second that Professor Stone hasn't been feeding a constant, perhaps life-sustaining hunger to hear for himself the latest, most creatively interesting and challenging music (and in his case, even the sound of a big-piped sports car or machinery), from all over the world and across all genres. I presume he always has, and this collection of vinyl reveals that fact in every liner note and cover spine. Collectors like this are searchers, never quite satisfied with what is, what was, or even what "shall" be, barely trusting word of mouth and the writing on the walls. We collectors shake down anything that could offer that special chord combination, the emotional rush, the personal spirituality button pushed, or a memory bubbling over God-knows-how and why. Often these elusive platters make just a brief appearance in our airspace, only to become a faded memory, "Yeah, I saw that once at Amoeba…", or more likely, a 3 a.m.-tossing-and-turning-I'm-going-back-first-thing-in-the-morning-I-hope-it's-still-there angst-filled moment. Carl looked high, low, in, out and around for significant records. Carl got beaucoup promos sent to him. Carl had people hold things for him. Artists sent Carl their records out of the blue. Carl impulse-bought. Good record labels covered Carl. Carl special ordered records. Carl travelled the world and bought records as meals for his soul.

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Rare Steve Lacy LP Shows Up In Hollywood

Posted by Rick Frystak, October 7, 2013 03:43pm | Post a Comment

Steve Lacy has always been one of my favorite horn players since I first hear him in the mid 70’s. He delivers a liquid, speech-like sound with his soprano saxophone which he plays exclusively.  Influenced by trad jazz players, Cecil Taylor, Thelonious Monk and Gil Evans, Mr. Lacy composes and improvises with a quirky sense of melody unlike any other player around at the time or since, and his compositions reveal his very personal way of telling his stories. His staccato yet fluid attack, and almost vibrato-less legato stands out within the history of his axe. He has made many, many records (hundreds) and almost each one has its own individual sound and ultimate expression. Straight up swing to musique concrete to free improvisation are where Steve could be found at any moment, often simultaneously. His accompanists range from sitar duos to big band improv to sax/synthesizer/ drum outings, exploring all avenues of audible art. He also made many solo concerts, with just his soprano sax perhaps speaking the musical dialog about what was shaking at the moment. These concerts and recordings are a wonderful document of this artist’s creative depth.

I am fortunate to have met Steve when I had an in-store appearance with him while I was managing Rasputin’s Jazz and Soul record store in Berkeley, California in 1981. Steve is second from left, just to my right in this photo of that day (Rick Gillman far left, Lacy, Frystak, Michael Finney far right).

A kind and soft spoken personality belied his passionate, forward surging playing style.  His many bay-area fans that day were in heaven to be near this musical icon, myself included. He played later in the evening at U.C.Berkeley to a packed house. Steve passed in 2004 at age 69 years young, and I was fortunate to see him play multiple times, always searching and swinging in whatever context he found himself in.

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