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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Jason Mantzoukas

Posted by Amoebite, July 24, 2018 02:26pm | Post a Comment

Jason Mantzoukas What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

We could barely keep up with actor & comedian Jason Mantzoukas on his recent visit to Amoeba Hollywood! He went digging through the bins, finding all sorts of records and films that have special meaning to him, waxing poetic in his own humorous way, and even giving post production directions to our video editor. The result is one of the most epic and entertaining What's In My Bag? episodes we've had the pleasure of producing.

How Did This Get MadeJason Mantzoukas began his career performing on a house team at the New York Upright Citizens Brigade Theater and he still regularly appears in the weekly Soundtrack show, where he and his teammates base their work off audience members' iPod playlists. Along with Paul Scheer and June Diane Raphael, he hosts the popular How Did This Get Made? podcast. Before his comedy career launched, he studied musicology in the Middle East as a Watson Fellow.

As an actor, Mantzoukas is instantly recognizable. He has appeared as Dennis Feinstein on Parks and Recreation, as Adrian Pimento on Brooklyn Nine-Nine, and as Derek Hoffstetler on The Good Place. He plays the character of Rafi in the FX comedy series The League. Other notable credits include appearances in Sacha Baron Cohen‎'s The Dictator, The Kroll Show, Modern Familyand Broad City. He can be heard as the voice of the threatening, slimy Mr. Mucus in Mucinex commercials.

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Dr. John’s Best Albums

Posted by Joe Goldmark, February 11, 2018 06:06pm | Post a Comment



Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

Dr. John is the funkiest white dude. Listen to his vocals, relate to the lyrics, enjoy his wonderful piano playing, and dig the arrangements. His bag includes blues and soul music, street parade music, trad jazz, and rock & roll, all played with N’awlinz sensibilities. Any questions? Here’s the four albums that move me the most:

Dr John Gris Gris

Gris-Gris

This is Dr. John’s masterpiece and it still sounds fresh and unique. When this album came out in 1968, it was played on underground rock radio and sounded otherworldly. With tunes like “I Walk On Gilded Splinters,” “Mama Roux," and “Jump Sturdy,” you can see how alien it was from a West Coast perspective. In retrospect, some of the production credit has to go to Harold Battiste, the legendary N.O. horn player and producer.


 

Dr. John's Gumbo
 

Dr. John’s Gumbo

New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Andrew Bird

Posted by Amoebite, February 13, 2017 06:41pm | Post a Comment

Andrew Bird What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

"I always make a B-line for the Y section in the Jazz department," explains singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Andrew Bird. "It's a ritual for me to get started when I go record shopping; just go find Lester Young." On his recent visit to Amoeba Hollywood, Bird expressed his love of the tenor saxophonist's recordings. Having found an album Young recorded with Teddy Wilson, Pres and Teddy, he explains his preference for his smaller group albums. "The small group stuff is incredibly inventive and lyrical."

Andrew Bird Are You Serious Amoeba MusicBest known for his solo work, Andrew Bird first came to prominence through his work with Squirrel Nut Zippers before founding Andrew Bird's Bowl of Fire. After Bowl of Fire disbanded in 2003, Bird's solo career began to take off with the release of Weather Systems and Andrew Bird & the Mysterious Production of Eggs on Ani Difranco's Righteous Babe Records. These records marked an evolution in Bird's sound, as he began incorporating glockenspiel and whistling into his eclectic indie rock compositions. He signed to Fat Possum in 2006 and released Armchair Apocrypha. Bird went on to perform tracks from the album on the Late Show with David Letterman and Late Night with Conan O'Brien.

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21 Essential New Orleans Records for Fat Tuesday

Posted by Amoebite, February 8, 2016 04:01pm | Post a Comment

21 Essentisl New Orleans Records for Fat Tuesday

If you are just dipping your toe into the mighty muddy Mississippi-sludge sounds of New Orleans music, here is a list to get your mojo workin', courtesy of members of the Amoeba family who are lifelong New Orleans music fanatics.

KAREN: The New Orleans sound is that rare gumbo of musical complements: a meaty stew of blues, R&B, jazz, African rhythms, Cuban, French, country Cajun, hip hop and so much more. But what defines New Orleans music? That is the unanswerable question. You can say it's this or it's that — it's the syncopation or the bass or the raw, funky rhythm. But really it's the soul of the music — the undefinable "Get Down" or "Get On Up." This is the music that carries your soul down the block on a second-line funeral procession — and gets your feet dancing in a musky club on Frenchman Street. It is playful. Funky. Deep and swampy. Raw and dirty. Mournful. Plaintive. And everything in between. It isn't defined by a drum beat. Or maybe it is. You've just got to listen for yourself.

Here are my top picks for records you need to own. Essential New Orleans listening, in no particular order. This is my own Dirty Dozen:

the wild tchoupitoulas

The Wild Tchoupitoulas - The Wild Tchoupitoulas

The Legendary Joe Baiza & The Cardovas Live @ Taix 5/1/2007

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, June 3, 2007 11:48pm | Post a Comment
Joe Baiza is a truly unique guitarist. His guitar playing is a mixture of angular punk rock, free jazz and the funkiness of one who grew up on thousands of R&B albums. His first group, Saccharine Trust, was ahead of their time during their first incarnation. Between the years of 1981 through 1986, Saccharine Trust went from minimalist punk to free jazz and spoken word, confusing most pedestrian punk rockers that wanted to hear hardcore. After Saccharine Trust's demise, Joe Baiza started The Universal Congress Of, a band that further explored his jazz influences. Again, Joe found himself between a rock and a hard place, being too punk for the jazz purists and too jazzy for the alternative rock set. Fortunately for Joe, Universal Congress Of found success in a Europe enthralled in the Acid Jazz movement in the late 80's/ early 90’s.

Joe continued to play in Europe for most of the early nineties until some idiotic German racists shattered his hand during a stay in Germany. He returned to Los Angeles to recover while his bandmates all remained in Germany. Joe decided to stay in L.A., starting a few new groups, The Mecolodiacs and Joe Baiza’s Congress Of, as well as reforming Saccharine Trust in 1999, who he still plays with to this day.

On Friday, I went to check out Joe’s latest musical endeavor at Taix Restaurant in Echo Park, The Cardovas. They played an all-Meters cover set, albeit with Baiza’s flavor. Normally, I don’t like the idea of seeing cover bands, but hey, it’s The Meters! And it's Baiza doing it! As I sat there waiting for The Cardovas to play, I couldn’t help but to look around. Taix looked like a punk rock rest home. I saw many people that I barely recognized from the punk scene back in the day because they look so much older. Some, like Nicky (formerly of the band Pop Defect), looked timeless. Nick is drumming in 3 bands, a sign that playing music will keep one looking young.

The Cardovas came on. It was Joe on Guitar, former Universal Congress Of bass player Ralph Gorodetsky on bass, former Claw Hammer/Devo Bob Lee on drums & vocals and local indie jazz icon Dan Clucas on the cornet. They also had an organ player as well who I did not recognize. They did all The Meters' classics, "Sissy Strut," "Look-Ka Py Py," "I Need More Time," "9 to 5," and, of course, "Cardova."

It was a blast! They were both tight and charmingly sloppy and of course, they had the funk. It was great to see those viejitos go at it. They looked like they were having a great time playing those songs. It made want to get married so I could hire them to play at my wedding.

The last song they played was "Hey Pockey Way," which is not my favorite song due to The Grateful Dead's butchering of it, but it got people up and dancing. Ex-punkers never made great dancers, so it was entertaining to watch them try to shake their thing. The band ended their brief set because they only learned so many Meters songs in the brief time they have played together. It was a bit of a letdown, only because I was having so much fun. I'm looking forward to the next Cardova show to hear what songs they will learn next. My requests: "Go For Yourself" & "Just Kissed My Baby."


Joe Biaza 101

Saccharine Trust:

Pagan Icons (1981)
Surviving You, Always (1984)
Worldbroken (1985)
We Became Snakes (1986)
Past Lives (1988)
The Great One Is Dead (2001)

Universal Congress Of:

S/T (1987)
Prosperous & Qualified (1988)
This Is Mecolodics (1988)
The Sad and Tragic Demise of Big Fine Salty Black Wind (1988)
The Eleventh-Hour Shine-On (1990)
Sparkling Fresh (1992)

Mecolodiacs:

Glamjazz (
1998)

Puttanesca:

S/T (2006)

For more info on Joe Baiza, go here.