Amoeblog

NYSOM #99

Posted by Billyjam, October 1, 2014 10:24am | Post a Comment
    

NYSOM #99 of 100: Earlier this month DJ Shadow and Cut Chemist kicked off their ongoing "Renegades of Rhythm" vinyl-only tour honoring Afrika Bambaataa's vast and influential record collection with two shows at NYC's Irving Plaza (after a stop in Boston) where my man Joe Conzo took the above photo of the two West Coast DJs who wore the perfectly appropriate matching T-shirts for the occasion with "DUMP" and "KOCH" emblazoned on the backs of them in a direct reference to the NYC era in which Bambaataa and hip-hop rose to fame in New York City. In keeping with this theme of that oft romanticized bygone era of a decidedly grittier and grungier New York City I've included a few other pics from NYC in the 70's and 80's in this second to final of a one hundred New York State of Mind Amoeblog series including one (left in 1981 taken by Bob Gruen) of The Clash when they visited NYC and (by the same wonderful photographer) one of The Ramones on the New York City subway. Others include one of the Beastie Boys from 1986 taken at Flushing Meadows Park in Queens by Sunny Bak. By the way the highly recommended ongoing records-only tour with DJ Shadow and Cut Chemist (whose t-shirts said "SURE" and "SHOT" on the other sides) will be stopping in the Bay Area this weekend with the tour when they play SF's Mezzanine on Saturday, October 4th. 

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Album Picks: Thee Oh Sees, Woods, The Both

Posted by Billy Gil, April 15, 2014 11:05am | Post a Comment

Thee Oh Sees - Drop (LP or CD)

thee oh sees drop lp amoebaThee Oh Sees’ perhaps final LP encapsulates what the band has done so well for the past decade while still forging new territory. The album balances songs that thump around in dark corners with those that bang out brilliantly. “Penetrating Eye” explores spacey moog sounds even as it unleashes an unholy howl of Sabbath guitars. “Put Some Reverb on My Brother” has a terrifically snarling little riff and sneering performance by John Dwyer, with saxophones that add extra pop. The title track has great, big Who-style guitarwork, making it one of the band’s most all-embracing rock tracks yet. “The King’s Noise” tries on some regal riffs and strings for a bit of proggy psychedelia. But for all of Drop’s catchiness, it’s the band’s ability to warp garage-rock guitars into something truly strange and unnerving that gets us every time, as on the spacey, scary “Transparent World.” If this is truly the end of Thee Oh Sees, they’ve gone out with a bang on one of their strongest albums yet.

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