Amoeblog

The Moon missions and the children of Major Tom -- the end of the space age and the music that followed

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 20, 2009 03:58pm | Post a Comment

It's the 40th anniversary of the first manned moon landing, and looking back at that achievement it's obvious that one of the many repercussions was evinced in the music of the era. In addition to the space rock of bands like Pink Floyd and Hawkwind and sci-fi minded funk acts like Funkadelic, the glam rock scene, which exploded around the same time, is one of the most obvious manifestations. For a couple of years, glam rock was massively popular in several countries and it spawned hordes of mylar-and-make-up-wearing rockers singing about extraterrestrial love and lonely planet boys. On December 7, 1972, the Apollo 17 was the last manned mission to the moon and the space age, shortly after, seems to have drawn quietly to a close. Glam rock seemed to fizzle shortly afterward, but maybe it just went underground, seeking out new frontiers in a different set of clothes.



First, in 1973, David Bowie retired his extraterrestrial Ziggy Stardust and released Aladdin Sane. Although hardly a radical departure, it was famously hyped as "Ziggy goes to America" and represented Bowie's efforts to move in a new direction. Then, in early 1974, glam rock's creator Marc Bolan announced that "Glam rock is dead." His February release, Zinc Alloy and the Hidden Riders of Tomorrow - A Creamed Cage in August, was described by its creator as "cosmic soul." Bowie described his next direction as "plastic soul" shortly afterward. Glam's two most important stars seemed committed to moving on in spirit, if perhaps overstating the change in their music.



At the peak of glam's popularity, a slew of teen idols flooded the charts with a highly commercial T Rex-inspired version of glam, largely courtesy of RAK Records and Bell Records. By stripping away most of artistic and thematic pretensions of earlier glam, these acts made a glam racket that was recognizable in sound but more oriented toward teen idolatry than the sci-fi decadence and often distinguished as glitter rock.

 

Anyone that dared affect arty, theatrical or androgynous trappings was doomed to critical derision and/or commercial disinterest. Two who did (and were martyred in the press for it) were Cockney Rebel and Jobriath & the Creatures of the Street. Having both released their first records in 1973, they were unfairly criticized as mere glam-rock-come-latelies attempting to fill the void left by Bowie. In many ways, they were the vanguard of a new crop of glam rockers who were undoubtedly inspired by The Dame but in no way mere clones and traded many of his sci-fi aspects for the decadent sophistication associated with Roxy Music (and Bowie). Several would find a measure of popularity (though in no cases approaching the heights of TRextasy) but more remained underground, with their hype usually surpassing their sales.

In fact, many probably would reject the notion that they were glam at all, as their brand of hard-pop drew from progressive rock, soul, disco and a variety of other genres. But what unites the artists of this so-called second wave of glam is the retention of the early glam spirit that left them at odds with the corduroy/beardy/chevy van/whiskey-chugging aesthetics that marked most rock of the era.

 

1973 Cockney Rebel - The Human Menagerie, Jobriath - Jobriath






    brett smiley breathlessly brett    another pretty face 21st century rock  Skyhooks Living in the 70's
 
1974 Cockney Rebel - The Psychmodo, Sailor - Sailor, Jobriath - Creatures of the Street, Brett Smiley - Breathlessly Brett, Paul Williams - The Phantom of the Paradise, Another Pretty Face - 21st Century Rock, Zolar X - "Space Age Love" b/w "Energize Me," Skyhooks - Living in the 70's








 


Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel Best Years of Our Lives   Alastair Riddell Space Waltz    Richard O'brien Rocky Horror Picture Show Soundtrack    Skyhook Ego is not a dirty word  

1975 Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel The Best Years of Our Lives, Sailor - Trouble, Alastair Riddell - Space Waltz, David Werner - Whizz Kid, Richard O'Brien - Rocky Horror Picture Show, Tiger Lily - "Monkey Jive" b/w "Ain't Misbehavin'," Skyhooks - Ego is Not a Dirty Word, Jet - Jet








Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel Timeless Flight     doctors of madness late night movies  doctors of madness figures of emancipation      john miles rebel    

1976 Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel - Timeless Flight and Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel - Love's A Prima Donna, Sailor - Third Step, Doctors of Madness - Late Night Movies, All Night Brainstorms, Doctors of Madness - Figments of Emancipation, David Werner - Imagination Quota, Roderick Falconer - New Nation, John Miles - Rebel, Supernaut - Supernaut, Skyhooks - Straight in a Gay World

With the so-called punk explosion, the always hyperbolic British music press got Khmer Rouge style and declared it year zero. Glam continued to exist underground and many more fine albums were released, however critically ignored they were, although most of the bands began to transform into something new, in some cases influencing the punk and new wave that were supposed to be reactions against glam. As Horace wrote, "Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus."




sailor checkpoint  roderick falconer victory in rock city  metro   


1977
Sailor - Checkpoint, Roderick Falconer - Victory in Rock City, Max Lazer - "Saints of Rock n' Roll" b/w "Street Queen," Metro - Metro, Jon Miles - Stranger in the City




doctors of madness sons of survivalJapan Adolescent Sex 1978 Japan Obscure Alternatives 1978
John Miles ZaragonSupernaut the Nauts

1978
 Sailor - Hideaway, Doctors of Madness - Sons of Survival, Japan - Adolescent Sex and Obscure Alternatives, Jon Miles - Zaragon, Supernaut - The Nauts, Skyhooks - Guilty Until Proven Insane





David Werner  Flashman    John Miles Mmph

1979
 David Werner - David Werner, Flashman - Flashman, Metro - New Love, Jon Miles - Mmph

       

1980 Sailor - Dressed for Drowning, Cuddly Toys - Guillotine Theatre, Metro - Future Imperfect, Jon Miles - Sympathy, Skyhooks - Hot for the Orient, Coby and Iris Recht with Roger S. Clinton - The Apple Soundtrack






1982
Cuddly Toys - Trials & Losses

The second wave of glam and glam-influenced pop/rock was always malleable but many bands' artistic evolution paralleled the shifting directions of the still active and relevant glam pioneers, Roxy Music and Bowie, incorporating new influences and inspiring many of the new wave/punk/post-punk/goth/urban void and especially the new romantics that followed. For example, Siouxsie and the Banshees covered Roxy Music, Sparks and T Rex, Bauhaus covered T Rex and David Bowie, The Damned played on Marc Bolan's program and the Adverts mingled with Doctors of Madness. Without glam, we probably never would've had bands as wide-ranging as ABC, Adam Ant, The Cure, Duran Duran, Hanoi Rocks, Japan, Joy Division, Klaus Nomi, Magazine, Nina Hagen, Tubeway Army or a host of others. Of course, in the '80s, there probably wouldn't have been anything like glam metal, which helped promote big hair and subsequently contributed to global warming, so it's not all good.

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P.S. Here's a video for the unreleased Jobriath track, "Little Dreamer," put together by his half-brother.

...and a Jobriath cover by Def Leppard, just because these artists did mean something to later generations.



Skweee - the sound of young Scando

Posted by Eric Brightwell, June 17, 2009 03:36pm | Post a Comment

Skweee is a stripped down, barebones, (mostly) Nordic and Finnish, minimal synthfunk. The songs sound like old midi files and karaoke soul music that's the perfect soundtrack to Leisure Suit Larry getting his mack on. The scene's been around for a few years and I can't remember when I first became aware of it... it may go back to the myspace age. Actually, this blog entry has been around a long time so I thought I should wrap it up. Vinyl is the medium of choice for this example of what can happen when your country pays you to advance their culture.

Check out these label sites if you're interested:
Flogsta Danshall, Harmönia, Dødpop, Disques Mazout and Titched.













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Vietnamese New Wave - Part II

Posted by Eric Brightwell, June 8, 2009 02:01pm | Post a Comment
Due to popular response, here's a follow-up to my initial blog on Vietnamese New Wave. For those of you who may not have read it, Vietnamese New Wave (less often called Asian New Wave) is not Vietnamese music. Think Northern Soul, a British genre of music that didn't come from British artists, but were beloved by 70s speed freaks for their common sound. At least, they didn't make it, but they took it, played it at dances, made bootleg mixes of it on tape and CD. The songs in the genre share easy-to-dance-to/syncopation-avoiding beats (setting it apart from Freestyle), easy-to-learn and obviously ESL lyrics, and are completely devoid of pretense or irony. My love and exposure to this amazing music is owed entirely to an amazing person, the flawless tastemaker, Ngoc Nguyen.


Vietnamese New Wave artists come from a variety of scenes including Italo-Disco, (English, French and Swedish) Synthpop and (German and Spanish) and Eurodisco. Beginning in the some time around the mid-to-late '80s, these bubbly, infectious tunes found an unexpected audience in the Vietnamese diaspora who disseminated these gems through the aforementioned mixtapes, parties and bootleg mix CDs which you can still find in Little Saigons around the globe.

We carry many of these artists at Amoeba. Most are found in the Freestyle section. However, a lot are found in, erm... Rock. So ask at info if you can't find something.


La Francitronique
- French synthpop
Where the French are widely known for their chanson and yé-yé, as well as their considerable contributions to Romanticism, house and rap (among other musical forms), their central importance in the development of electronic pop music is bizarrely less well known than, say, the Germans' or Italians' -- even though Jean Michel Jarre and The Rockets were making electronic pop music back when Kraftwerk were still bearded, flute-playing hippie longhairs. Nonetheless, most French synthpop was sung in French, thereby considerably limiting its audience. But at least two acts are firmly within the Vietnamese New Wave canon.

 
Début de Soirée


F.R. David

Kashmir (no video)

Magazine 60


Freizeithknast
-
German Eurodisco

Like most Eurodisco, the German variety is often lumped in with Italo, despite its Teutonic origins. Although musically it’s quite similar, there is an overall greater emphasis on pop song structures resulting in a slightly less club-oriented, keytar-dominated sound that takes it further away from its disco roots. Additionally, whether produced by Dieter Bohlen (Lian Ross, Modern Talking, Blue System, C.C. Catch, &c) or not, many German Eurodisco songs bear his influence, or that of others in his style. Whereas the Anglosphere proved fairly unreceptive to German Eurodisco, the artists found massive fame in Central, Eastern and Northern Europe; the Middle East, South Africa, and of course East and Southeast Asia.

Angela Lee (no video)

Bad Boys Blue


CC Catch

Cheryl Hardy (no video)

Fancy

Gina T


Jim Player (no video)

Joy


Kay Franzes

Kelly Brown


Lian Ross


Modern Talking

Mozzart

Sandra

silent circle

Stravaganza (no video)


Italio Stalio
- Italo-Disco

Initially, what came to be known (only in retrospect, mind you) as Italo disco grew out of a synthesis of Space Disco's sci-fi preoccupation and (usually) Hi-NRG's staccato rhythms. Although “disco” became a dirty word in the Anglosphere, much of the rest of the world wasn’t ready to give up the ghost in the arcade machine. Whereas rock and rap grew unhealthily preoccupied with authenticity and machismo, Italo remained blithely indifferent and the videos often featured heavily-made up or scantily clad figures chosen more for their figures than singing talents. Although Italo is often used to describe all music in the ‘80s Eurodisco scene, here it’s only used for genuine Italian artists…although I hesitate to use the words “genuine” and “artist.”

Den Harrow

Fake (no video)

Fun Fun

Gazebo

Kano

Katey Gray (no video)

Ken Laszlo

My Mine

Wish Key

Sabrina


Savage



El sonido Sabadell 
- Spanish Eurodisco
Unlike their Mediterranean neighbor, Italy; Spain isn’t nearly as widely recognized for their '80s Eurodisco scene. In fact, it's much more likely to be referred to as Italo than its German Eurodisco counterpart. To be sure, there is little to distinguish Spanish Disco from Italo-disco musically, but the Spanish variety is much more often sung in the performers' native language. In Spain, it was widely associated with the Catalonian city of Sabadell.

David Lyme (no video)

Night Society (no video)

Squash Gang

Viet covers

Of course, it was only a matter of time before Vietnamese performers (such as Anh Thuu, Lynda Trang Dai, Nguyen Thanh, Tommy Ngo, Trizzie Phuong Trinh, &c) and Cantonese singer Cally Kwong started covering the New Wave songs, although amongst fans, nearly everyone understandably seems to prefer the originals.




Ya Hoidz Me? - Talk About Bounce Music

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 20, 2009 12:01am | Post a Comment

For some reason, the Bounce scene, born nearly 20 years ago, seems to be undergoing a minor critical reassessment as it inspires curiosity in a new generation of fans amongst the young, the Euro, the old and new. I can only guess why. I suspect that part of it is a development of the ongoing, time-delayed, middle class fascination with vulgar, good-time booty, that, as with booty bass, gogo, ghettotech and juke house before, takes a little longer to catch on beyond the music's traditional base. Or perhaps it’s just the curiosity factor due to the prevalence of so many openly gay rappers, who have been the subject of articles in The Village Voice, The Guardian and The New York Times -- although their readers are unlikely to run out and buy the latest
Sissy Rap record. There was even a piece on Bounce for NPR’s stomach-turning attempt at hipness, What's the New What? ...Just the title of that show makes me feel like I've been kicked where it hurts.


On the other hand, sites like
Louisiana Rap, Nola Bounce and Twankle and Glisten have done a good job in documenting the scene and suggest a much deeper, more honest appreciation that makes me happy. I'll be honest, the idea of a politician claiming to like Bounce would make me die a little inside. Yet, I’d love it if all these underappreciated, undercredited artists who made Bounce happen got some well-deserved acknowledgment and attention. With films like Ya Heard Me documenting the scene and Youtubers like 1825 Tulane Ave and Whatheallman tirelessly keeping Bounce in your ear, I guess I can live with the idea that some ironic, comb-over-wearing member of the Dumpster Click is going to be into it too. Anyway, for the time being, if you look up "New Orleans Bounce" on Youtube, you're (currently, at least) unlikely to be confronted with the image an American Apparel/Vice Magazine disaster doing the Eddie Bow.


 
New Orleans’s Pre-Bounce Background
By the early 1980s, rap had spread to every reasonably large American city, each of which responded in part with scenes of their own. Almost universally, these early artists were highly imitative of their New York inspirations. New Orleans’s New York Incorporated (formed in 1984) and Ninja Crew (formed in 1986) were no exceptions. Within a few years, Miami’s Maggotron and MC A.D.E. were creating Electro-indebted Booty Bass and Houston’s Geto Boys and L.A.’s NWA were making Gangsta Rap -- all highly regionalized in their identities. Early New Orleans rappers like Tim Smooth, Warren Mayes and 39 Posse began incorporating various elements of the hip hop of the day, but for the most part, didn't verbally or musically represent the Crescent that overtly.


In the 1980s, port traffic in New Orleans had dried up following the oil industry going bust. Employment opportunities were suddenly limited primarily to the tourist-focused service industry and the city plunged deeply into poverty. With jobs and money scarce, crime on the rise and the war on drugs stepped up, New Orleans grew increasingly cutthroat and violent. By the late ‘80s/early ‘90s, whereas almost all American cities began to see a rise in gang culture, the more desperate New Orleans remained dominated by self-starters, self-servers and hustlers with rivalries and identities tied more often to wards and the city's many, large housing projects than organized gangs. In the process, New Orleans’s hip hop scene began to craft a unique identity quite different than that of most other cities. Tracks like Gregory D & DJ Mannie Fresh’s “Buck Jump Time” and MC Thick’s “Marrero (What The Fuck They Be Yellin)” began to express a New Orleans lyrical specificity largely absent from previous NO rap tracks. In addition, the projects (as well as clubs like Big Man’s, Flirts, 49 and Ghost Town) served as the primary venues for local, aspiring rappers.



But it wasn’t until Bounce that New Orleans crafted a truly unique brand of hip hop, largely based on the samples of two seemingly unlikely records whose journey to New Orleans remains obscure. New York rappers The Showboys released “Drag Rap” in 1986 to resounding disinterest. The first half of the track is very much in the vein of Run DMC, but the latter half kicks off with a synth cowbell-punctuated beat that forms the basis of almost all Bounce. The other track, perhaps even less likely to find its way to New Orleans, was British rapper Derek B’s 1987 single, “Rock the Beat.” An instrumental version of it, labeled “Brown Beats,” was included on legendary DJ Cameron Paul’s mix, Beats & Pieces. These two singles became the backbone of almost all Bounce, although, despite what you often read, they were by no means the only ones. You hear a lot of Rebirth Jazz Band, John Carpenter's Halloween theme and the Jackson 5 in Bounce as well. Just check out
http://bouncebreaksarchive.blogspot.com/ for a fairly comprehensive list.

 
What is Bounce?
Bounce, it is often noted, is based on repetitive, simplistic, call-and-response lyrics (mostly ward and neighborhood shout outs and dance call outs) and built (primarily) on just the two aforementioned singles. One thing that seems conspicuously absent from discussions of Bounce is the Dancehall-influenced flow of the rappers. In the early '90s, that influence was everywhere, from acts like Fu-Schnickens to songs like Ice Cube's "Wicked," which (like many others of the day) featured a guy toasting at some point.


Despite what the national media often suggests, Bounce isn't the widely-heard, late ‘90s New Orleans rap coming from labels like Cash Money and No Limit, although they, along with other New Orleans rappers like Devious, Dog House Posse, Kane & Abel, Mia X, Ruthless Juveniles and others occasionally incorporated Bounce aspects or recorded individual Bounce tracks.


Now a lot of haters and moaners will hate and moan about how Bounce is responsible for killing rap. Supposedly it does this by shifting the emphasis away from the (supposedly progressive) artistry of simple, rhyming couplets delivered with an unvariably 4-4 beat toward Bounce's polyrhythmic, lyrically abstract, fun chants that owe more to the Second Line; Bashment, slave-created music forms (e.g. field hollers and ring shouts); and children’s street culture like playground songs (e.g. "K-I-S-S-I-N-G"), clapping games (e.g." Mary Mack," "Miss Susie," "Stella Elle Olla") and jump-rope rhymes ("Fudge, fudge, call the judge," or "Three, six, nine, The goose drank wine"). This unpretentious rootsiness horrifies stodgy purists, creaky fuddy-duddies and cultural watchdogs but is ripe for enjoyment both from p-poppers and subcultural anthropologists who can hear that Bounce expresses more personality in one silly line than most “serious” rappers do over entire careers of insecure, self-absorbed, macho fantasy.

Trailer for Ya Heard Me

Bitch, Stop Talkin’ that Ish - Bounce’s Golden Age
With such a limited lyrical lexicon, DJs and producers like Polo, Precise, DJ Duck, DJ Money Fresh, Mannie Fresh, Henry the Man, E-Jay, and DJ Irv should get at least as much credit as the MCs for the creation of Bounce. Because, at least as important as calling out every ward, project and (on rare occasions) Southern state is the curiously powerful pull of those beats that just grab you.

TT Tucker & DJ Irv - "Where Dey At?"
 
1991
Bounce really began in late 1991, when TT Tucker and DJ Irv recorded, but never officially released, a song they’d perfected at Ghost Town, the blueprint for the genre, “Where Dey At?” It was so repetitive, so infectious and so gutter, it captured the hearts and minds of thousands and so it began. Sadly, the duo never much capitalized on their pivotal role, with TT Tucker in and out of the clink and DJ Irv tragically shot and killed.


DJ Jimi (featuring Jimi's mom) - "The Bitch's Reply"

1992
Almost immediately, similar Bounce songs followed in the wake of "Where Dey At?" Jimi “DJ Jimi” Payton, a DJ at Big Man’s, joined by Dion “Devious” Norman and Derrick “Mellow Fellow” Ordogne, crafted a followup, "(The Original) Where They At." After it was licensed to Memphis’s Avenue Records, it resulted in a response track from Memphian rapper FM with “Gimme What You Got (For a Pork Chop!). DJ Jimi also gave the first recording exposure to Juvenile, who went on to find lasting fame beyond the genre, but did so much with so little (lyrically) as a Bounce artist. That same year, Mannie Fresh and Gregory D ended their professional relationship, unhappy with RCA’s handling of their career. Fresh then joined the fledgling Cash Money label, whose first release (Kilo-G’s Sleepwalker) was not Bounce, but who soon were known for crafting Bounce songs, as was the fledgling Take Fo’ Records.

D.J. Jimi (featuring Juvenile)
– “Bounce (For the Juvenile)”
D.J. Jimi - “(The Original) Where They At”
Everlasting Hitman - Bounce! Baby, Bounce!

Ju'C - "Lick Da Cat"
 
1993
1993 was the year that Bounce really exploded. Moving beyond its simplistic origins only slightly, groups like UNLV helped popularize the genre by adding elements of Gangsta Rap and soon inspired many similar releases by other acts, especially across town, over at the brand-new Big Boy Records, which escalated into a heated Gangsta Bounce rivalry.

Da’ Sha Ra’ – Bootin’ Up
Daddy Yo – “I’m Not Your Trick Daddy”  
DJ Jubilee – “Jubilee All (Stop Pause)”
Joe BlakkIt Ain’t Where Ya From
Ju’C – “Lick Da Cat”
MC Spud & DJ Def  - “Holla If Ya Hear Me”
Lil Elt – “Get da Gat”
Sporty T – “Jackin for Bounce”
UNLV – “UNLV Style,” “Eddie Bow“

Fila Phil - "Hustlaz"

1994
In 1994, national interest in Bounce was first shown when Scott Aiges wrote an article on how much more popular the genre was in New Orleans than nationally promoted artists. The tone at the labels wasn't so much interest, but concern. They wondered why people were buying tapes out of trunks instead of the "Heatseekers" on the Hot 100? On April 22, in a tragedy for Bounce, his friends, fans and family, local legend Edgar "Pimp Daddy" Givens was murdered in the 9th ward.

B-32I Need a Bag of Dope
Fila Phil – “Hustlaz “
Lil Slim – “Eagle St. Bounce”
Partners-N-CrimePNC
Pimp Daddy – “Got 2 Be Real”
 

Dolemite - "Hustla, Hustla"

1995
In 1995, No Limit moved from Richmond, California to New Orleans where the Bounce scene was, by then, huge... at least, regionally. No Limit released a compilation of both Bounce and non-Bounce artists, Down South Hustlas -- Bouncing and Swingin' and began to successfully build on the New Orleans rap scene, ultimately signing a major deal with Priority, then flush with cash off the success of The California Raisins. Over the next few years, their Pen & Pixel-decorated CDs flooded the national market and media interest in New Orleans exploded as Southern rap began to completely eclipse the east and west coasts.

Cheeky Blakk – “Bitch Get Off Me,“ “Twerk Sumthin’"
Dolemite – "Hustla Hustla"
Ricky B. – “Shake Fa Ya Hood,” “Who Got The Fire”
2 BlakkThe Game
 

Magnolia Shorty - "Monkey on the D$ck"

1996
On February 6th, 1996, another Bounce pioneer, Floyd "Everlasting Hitman" Blount was tragically murdered in Fisher. Around the same time, with UNLV’s hit "Drag 'Em in the River" and No Limit’s Beats By the Pound-crafted, bottom-heavy, electronic-based rap, the media began to inaccurately ascribe the term "Bounce" to these nationally popular New Orleans releases. Over the next few years, the word “Bounce” was to be tossed like so much Mrs. Dash by many a non-southerner trying to add a little spice.

Lady Red – “Smokin’ Dat Weed”
Magnolia Shorty – “Monkey on the D$ck “


Kilo - "The Ward Song"
 
1997
By 1997, all of Cash Money’s original lineup of Bounce and non-Bounce artists were either dead (UNLV’s Albert "Yella Boy" Thomas was murdered on April 5th of that year) or dropped. Solja Rags, the new Juvenile album, further shifted attention away from Bounce with Juvenile' new direction and Mannie Fresh's continuation of his sound first evinced with UNLV a year earlier.

Kilo
– "The Ward Song"
Willie Puckett- "Doggie Hopp"
 
Snap Crackle Pop – The Silver Age of Bounce
By the end of the millennium (following their meteoric rise in popularity, major label deals, and subsequent mass defections of talent), Cash Money and No Limit were both reduced to being primarily family affairs. At the same time, national interest in Southern Hip Hop began to shift to Atlanta, Houston and Memphis -- scenes that owed heavily to New Orleans's sound and successes. 


Josephine Johnny - "Workin' With Sumthin'"

A new generation of Bounce artists began to expand the production pallet of Bounce, ironically, toward the increased use synthesizers and programming popularized by Beats By the Pound and Mannie Fresh, who’d helped popularize (in some ways at the expense of Bounce) New Orleans’s non-Bounce successes. The new crop of Bounce artists, despite moving beyond their Triggerman-and-Brown-Beat-sampling forebears, nonetheless undeniably carried the Bounce torch when, to some, it must've seemed all but done and dusted. In addition to all of these artists remaining active today, there are newer acts in the same vein, like Da Block Burnaz, keeping the classic N.O. Bounce spirit alive, whereas most rappers chase passing fads.

1999
5th Ward Weebie – “Show the World”
 
2000
Josephine Johnny – “Workin’ Wit Somethin “
 
2001
Choppa –“ Choppa Style”
 
Tweaker Twerk - Modern Bounce & Sissy Rap
Undeniably defying the tired suggestion that all Bounce sounds the same, modern Bounce artists can truly be said to be taking it into new directions. A large part of this seems to be due to the rise of Sissy Rap, the openly gay Bounce offshoot pioneered by Katey Red & Dem Hoes. Following her lead, a whole host of Sissy Rappers followed with similarly ear-splitting, racous songs whose lyrics make early Bounce artists look like Charles Dickens. Always more egalitarian than mainstream and so-called progressive hip hop, Bounce (like a lot of booty-targeting music) has always had a comparatively large following among women and gays. The “Sissy” moniker, like “Cheb” in Rai, is nearly but not quite universal. With newer Bounce artists including Big Freeda (aka Big Freedia), rappers on the DL, heteroflexibles and just given the confusing sartorial sense of kids today, it becomes harder to differentiate many Sissy Rappers from straight modern Bounce artists, as their music is generally very similar.

Gotty Boi Chris - "Dip Low"
 
The defining development of modern Bounce and Sissy Rap is the increased aural insanity. Faster tempos, lyrics reduced to chopped and repeated phonemes, punishing dissonance, cacophonous clangor and frequently blown out production have turned what was once a distinct-from-but-recognizably-related-to-hip-hop genre into something that sounds like a hybrid of Gabber and Gnawa. The end result is almost avant-garde, and more deserving of the hype and description that Konono No. 1 generated a few years back with their comparatively familiar, down-to-earth approach. No doubt the increasingly insular nature of Bounce is only part of what keeps it out of the mainstream, despite recent media attention.


Big Choo - "Get Low"

Unfortunately, finding accurate discographical information on Bounce artists seems to grow surprisingly more difficult, the newer the artist. But other exemplars include DJ Black N Mild, Big Choo (“Get Low”), 9th Ward Tea, 10th Ward Buck, Chev Off the Ave (“Hollywood Bounce”), Dre Skull, Elm Boy Peg, Gotty Boi Chris, MC Shakie (“Double Dribble” and “Hands on Da Ground”), Sissy Jay, Sissy Nobby and Vockah Redu.
 
1999
Katey Red & Dem Hoes – “Tiddy Bop”
 
2000
Big Freedia –“A'han, Oh Yeah”
 
2002
SWA – “We’re #1“
 
2004
Faster Boyz – “I Ain’t Had Sex in a Long Time”
 
2005
Hot Boy Ronald – “Walk Like Ronald "

Any corrections or additions will be incorporated. Peace!


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The Death of Old Time Radio

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 30, 2008 12:25am | Post a Comment

THE END OF THE GOLDEN AGE

On this day (September 30) in 1962 CBS radio broadcast the final episodes of Suspense and Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar and the Golden Age of Radio came to a close. 

 

RADIO'S BEGINNINGS 

Radio Drama (also frequently referred to as Old Time Radio or OTR) really began in the 1920s. Before that, there was audio theater which consisted of plays performed for radio broadcast. It wasn't until August 3, 1922 at the Schenectady, New York station WGY that the in-house actors, The WGY Players, broadcast a performance that augmented the drama with music and sound effects, creating a vivid aural tapestry. The result was a worldwide explosion in what was an instantly popular new art form. Within months there were radio dramas being produced across the USA, as well as in Canada, Ceylon, France, Germany, India, Japanand the UK.



RADIO DRAMA'S ADOLESCENCE 

In 1934, the anthology series Lights Out debuted and exploited many of radio's unique qualities to massive success. The program was penned by Wyllis Cooper and aired at midnight. Cooper employed stream of conscious monologues, multiple first-person narrators and internal monologues which were at odds with the characters' spoken dialog. It's most often remembered, however, for its gruesome and explicit sound effects which attempted to suggest joints being ripped from sockets, skin being eviscerated, heads being decapitated and other depictions of violence that would still be pushing the envelope, even on modern cable television programs.

  

Radio drama's most well-known moment came in 1938 when Orson Welles on the Mercury Theater of the Air broadcast War of the Worlds. Virtually everyone has heard tales about the mass panic that supposedly ensued. It turns out that this supposed reaction may've been invented by newspapers who were threatened by the radio news' growing dominance. Since there are no verifiable reports of nationwide panic, it seems that newspapers were attempting to create a moral panic to save their own skins. Indeed, how likely is it that a people used to  both radio dramas and the instantly recognizable voice of  radio drama mainstay Orson Welles would, for some reason, think that he was acting as a newsman covering a Martian invasion? If Kelsey Grammar was on TV reporting that Earth was being attacked by another planet, would you assume it was real and panic? If your answer is yes, then you are a dullard.

 


RADIO'S END

Radio drama began to lose ground in the 1950s for several reasons. Mainly, television (though around for some time) exploded in popularity and, with the novelty of a visual aspect, stole the dramatic thunder from radio (and film too), partially by dumbing down the writing and toning down the violence to broaden its audience. Many radio dramas attempted to make the transfer to television in order to survive. Often this necessitated re-casting key roles because, whilst a voice actor might've sounded the part, they didn't look it.

At the same time, music radio began to make a comeback. Forced by the 1940s writers strike to look elsewhere for music (rather than pay pop songwriters more), music radio popularized previously marginalized music forms like Hillbilly and Rhythm & Blues which grew in popularity and merged into Rock 'n' Roll. The dissemination of this electrifying new development in music was aided by a new recording format, the 45 rpm single. Now families could rock out or veg out on their own and radio rapidly lost ground before going the way of silent film and magic lantern shows.

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