Amoeblog

Dr. John’s Best Albums

Posted by Joe Goldmark, February 11, 2018 06:06pm | Post a Comment



Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

Dr. John is the funkiest white dude. Listen to his vocals, relate to the lyrics, enjoy his wonderful piano playing, and dig the arrangements. His bag includes blues and soul music, street parade music, trad jazz, and rock & roll, all played with N’awlinz sensibilities. Any questions? Here’s the four albums that move me the most:

Dr John Gris Gris

Gris-Gris

This is Dr. John’s masterpiece and it still sounds fresh and unique. When this album came out in 1968, it was played on underground rock radio and sounded otherworldly. With tunes like “I Walk On Gilded Splinters,” “Mama Roux," and “Jump Sturdy,” you can see how alien it was from a West Coast perspective. In retrospect, some of the production credit has to go to Harold Battiste, the legendary N.O. horn player and producer.


 

Dr. John's Gumbo
 

Dr. John’s Gumbo

21 Essential New Orleans Records for Fat Tuesday

Posted by Amoebite, February 8, 2016 04:01pm | Post a Comment

21 Essentisl New Orleans Records for Fat Tuesday

If you are just dipping your toe into the mighty muddy Mississippi-sludge sounds of New Orleans music, here is a list to get your mojo workin', courtesy of members of the Amoeba family who are lifelong New Orleans music fanatics.

KAREN: The New Orleans sound is that rare gumbo of musical complements: a meaty stew of blues, R&B, jazz, African rhythms, Cuban, French, country Cajun, hip hop and so much more. But what defines New Orleans music? That is the unanswerable question. You can say it's this or it's that — it's the syncopation or the bass or the raw, funky rhythm. But really it's the soul of the music — the undefinable "Get Down" or "Get On Up." This is the music that carries your soul down the block on a second-line funeral procession — and gets your feet dancing in a musky club on Frenchman Street. It is playful. Funky. Deep and swampy. Raw and dirty. Mournful. Plaintive. And everything in between. It isn't defined by a drum beat. Or maybe it is. You've just got to listen for yourself.

Here are my top picks for records you need to own. Essential New Orleans listening, in no particular order. This is my own Dirty Dozen:

the wild tchoupitoulas

The Wild Tchoupitoulas - The Wild Tchoupitoulas

Psych-Soul Trio KING Chat Before Amoeba Performance Jan. 28

Posted by Billy Gil, January 27, 2016 10:39am | Post a Comment

L.A.-based KING bring their uniquely stirring brand of swirling psychedelic soul to the Amoeba Hollywood stage for a free show Jan. 28 at 6 p.m. They'll also have their debut LP, We Are KING, on sale that day at Amoeba prior to the album's official release on Feb. 5.

KING consist of Anita Bias and sisters Paris Strother and Amber Strother. Paris is the primary producer and instrumentalist of the band, while Amber and Anita's breahty vocals hopscotch over Paris' jazzy concoctions. Together they produce a sound that doesn't skimp on complexity but also exudes warmth, using horns and unabashedly synthy keys for a sound that weaves together classic soul, synth-funk, dream pop and certain something undefinable that gives KING its own essence.

The group has drummed up a vocal fanbase on Twitter even before dropping its first album, one that includes none other than Prince, who asked the group to open for him one night during his 21-night residency at the Forum in Inglewood in 2011. Unfortunately it's also part of their story that as a trio of women writing and producing their own soul music, A&R folks have suggested the group alter their image and essentially dumb down the sound, as they told LA Weekly. I asked them about all of that and more when I caught up with them before their Amoeba show.

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Brightwell's Top 10: 1972

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 19, 2015 10:50pm | Post a Comment
In 1857, Frenchman Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville patented his invention for recording sound, the phonautograph. Twenty years later, in 1877, someone first realized that his phonautograms could also play back recorded music. It was the same year, coincidentally, that Thomas Edison patented the phonograph and thus the age of recorded music began. In 2015, former Amoebite Matthew Messbarger posted an NME "Best of 1990" on my Facebook timeline and I decided to began reviewing the best songs of each year, from 1877 to the present, in random order.

*****

The demolition of Pruitt-Igoe

1972 was a turbulent year. The violence of the Troubles peaked, claiming the lives of more than 500 people.Though comparatively ignored in the west, the Burundian Genocide also began, which claimed the lives of over 500,000. Ferdinand Marcos placed the Philippines under martial law. Black September invaded the Olympic Village and murdered eight Israeli athletes in Munich Members of the German Red Army Faction were arrested in FrankfurtThe Asama-Sansō Incident took place in Japan. Native Americans from the The Trail of Broken Treaties took over buildings belonging to the Bureau of Indian AffairsAngela Davis was found not guilty of murder. Missouri's notorious Pruitt–Igoe projects were demolished. Health officials admitted that blacks had been used as guinea pigs in a study of untreated syphilis. Shirley Chisholm became the first black candidate for US president although the American people instead choose to re-elect fascinating nutjob Richard Nixon





Outside Earth, humans visited the moon for the last time. The Space Shuttle program began. Mariner 9 became the first artificial satellite to orbit another planet (Mars). The Pioneer 10 launched from Cape Kennedy and would become the first human-made object to leave the solar system. In art, Andrei Tarkovsky's science-fiction masterpiece Solaris debuted and although perhaps not masterpieces, Eolomea and Silent Running entertained. With all of that space travel its no wonder it was glam rock's' annus mirabilis. Capitalizing on the space craze, David Bowie's 1969 song, "Space Oddity" was re-released and Elton John, doing his best Bowie, released "Rocket Man" (which was later covered by William Shatner which was later covered by Chris Elliott). 


 

In technology and entertainment news, 
HBO was launched, Atari was founded and released PongThe first scientific hand-held calculator, the HP-35, was introduced for the price of $395 (about $1,750 in 2015 dollars). Bands including Creedence Clearwater Revival, Jefferson Airplane, Martha and the Vandellas, MC5, Them, and The Velvet Underground all called it a day. ABBA, Cockney Rebel, Devo, The Jam, Mama's Pride, The Ozark Mountain Daredevils, Rockets, Rufus, Van Halen and many other bands formed. It was a great year for music, with Neil YoungThe SweetThe Four TopsMott the HoopleYesBig StarTownes Van ZandtGentle GiantMarvin Gaye, Genesis, Lieutenant Pigeon, Lou Reed, Curtis MayfieldRoxy Music, and Hawkwind all releasing amazing songs that barely missed my Top 10.

*****

10. Bee Gees - Run to Me



9. Hot Butter - Pop Corn



8. The RaspberriesGo All The Way 



7. BreadGuitar Man 



6. Manu DibangoSoul Makossa (Funky Soul Makossa) 



5. Chicory Tip - Son of My Father 



4. David BowieStarman 



3. T. RexMetal Guru 



2. The DramaticsIn The Rain 



1. Al Green - I'm Still in Love with You - 





*****

Follow me at ericbrightwell.com

Mitty Collier - Unheralded Soul #3

Posted by Joe Goldmark, July 22, 2015 07:32pm | Post a Comment

Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

Mitty Collier Mitty Collier

Mitty Collier came from the church, had a soul career for 10 years, and went back to the church to stay in 1972. She had the deepest, sexiest voice in soul music, but she still flew under the radar. Although she had many R&B hits, she was just too gritty for Top 40 radio. Mitty’s early career was with Chess Records in Chicago, but her best work was produced by Stax soul legend William Bell for the Peachtree label in Atlanta.  

I’d Like To Change Places – (Entrance)



Share What You Got – (Peachtree)



Lovin’ On Borrowed Time – (Peachtree)



You Hurt So Good – (Peachtree)



Everybody Makes A Mistake Sometimes – (Chess)



I Had A Talk With My Man – (Chess)



That’ll Be Good Enough For Me – (Chess)



I Gotta Get Away From It All – (Chess)


 

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