Amoeblog

Flower Piano At The San Francisco Botanical Garden In Golden Gate Park

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, June 12, 2019 07:57pm | Post a Comment

Flower Piano

Amoeba Music is thrilled to be a sponsor of the fifth anniversary Flower Piano celebration at San Francisco Flower PianoBotanical Garden (SFBG) in Golden Gate Park, July 11th - July 22nd. Flower Piano transforms the Garden into the city’s own alfresco concert hall for twelve days, and everyone is invited to play and listen for just the price of regular Garden admission. Twelve pianos are tucked among the many flower-filled gardens within SFBG’s 55 acres and are available to the public to play each day, July 11-22, from 9am-6pm, except during select performances.

On weekend days, the public can enjoy a diverse schedule of performances from guest musicians and artists. Both Saturday, July 13th and Saturday, July 20th feature the always-popular Twelve Piano Extravaganza when all of the pianos are taken over by the pros between 12-2pm. Visitors can listen to a wide variety of genres from classical to cabaret over the course of two hours. On July 13th, this event includes a fun-for-all, dance-along ballet extravaganza led by Daniel Sullivan. July 13th also features a special program from 2-5pm by a full symphony orchestra known as the Awesöme Orchestra Collective that invites the audience to experience both the rehearsal and performance of two piano concertos. The following Saturday, July 20th, Sunset Piano performs poetry and music collaborations from 2-5:30pm, Bay Area Hawaiian dance supergroup Na Lei Hulu I ka Wekiu will perform innovative contemporary and traditional hula accompanied by piano from 2-4pm, and members of SF Symphony will perform from 3-5pm.

Continue reading...

"It's the MOST... Blackhistorymonthy tiiime of the yeeear...!"

Posted by Job O Brother, January 31, 2010 10:45am | Post a Comment
bessie smithbeyonce

I know what you’re thinking: How can it be that it’s Black History Month again, already? It seems to come up faster with each passing year. No sooner do I finish cleaning up all the gift wrap and decorations from 2009’s BHM festivities when – BAM! – time to break ‘em out again for 2010.

But I am excited! I love draping my house in the traditional BHM crushed-velvet flour sacks, heated bear skins, and twinkling, sapphire, mailboxes. We gather together around the hot oil printing press and sing BHM carols, get tipsy on Pancake-Sausage Nog, and remind each other, with love in our hearts, not to forget to turn off the air conditioner before leaving the house. Oh, joy! Oh sweet, unmitigated joy!

Of all these rituals, my favorite is the singing of the carols. I thought I’d share some of them with you, and invite you to sing along with me! Just click on a song below and belt one out. If you’re at work, or reading this on your iPhone while standing in the check-out line at Trader Joe’s, or simultaneously looking at Internet porn (way to multi-task!) – no matter! Sing all the louder! Let everyone know: You’re Black and You’re Proud!

The roots of jazz - ragtime

Posted by Eric Brightwell, August 24, 2009 04:48pm | Post a Comment
Although for most people the strains of "The Entertainer" and other rags now primarily evoke quaint, scratchy images of silent films projected at the wrong speed, when ragtime first appeared around the 1870s, it was the soundtrack of Missouri's whorehouses, parlors and gambling clubs.

st. louis 1870
St. Louis in the 1870s

Ragtime was also one of the first truly and distinctly American musical forms. After cakewalk, ragtime was one of the first global music crazes. That Ragtime's cradle was the river towns of the Missouri Valley shouldn't be a surprise. Missouri, located at the center of the country, has long been and remains a crossroads of cultural exchanges. No state borders more than Missouri and noted ragtime musicians came from all the neighbors and spread to them (except Nebraska and Iowa, states whose people are known to be deaf to the joys of melody and dance). The character of ragtime -- drawing from folk, European and American marches, minstrelsy, spirituals and other forms -- connects Europe, Africa and North America, town and country, classical and popular, black and white.

Continue reading...