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Wall of Sound: West Coast Punk Art Retrospective at Steven Wolf Fine Arts, SF

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 12, 2012 03:45pm | Post a Comment
Focusing exclusively on the West Coast's punk rock art movement of the 1970's, Wall of Sound at
Exene Cervenka art
Exene Cervenka, Dick, 2008 
Steven Wolf Fine Arts (July 12th - Sept 8th) features work by artists who are better known as musicians, and by musicians who are better known as artists. 

The rise of punk rock in the 1970s provoked an explosion of collage-based visual art. A new generation of rebels reworked dada aesthetics in the design of flyers, zines, and studio art. Some of the most interesting work was done by the musicians themselves. The bridge that formed between music and visual art inaugurated a hybridity now common in studio practice where art history shares equal space with movies, music, and television as source material for artists. 

See work by:
David J. Hastings
Tomata Du Plenty
J.C. Garrett
Fayette Hauser
V. Vale
Matt Heckert
Raymond Pettibon
and more....

Violence Girl By Alice Bag

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, May 21, 2012 07:23am | Post a Comment
Violence Girl is what Alice Bag calls a "Chicana Punk Story" For those of you who are unfamiliar with Alice Bag (Alicia Armandariz) she is a singer/musician that in her teens was part of the early punk scene in Los Angeles. She along with Patricia Morrison formed The Bags, who are not only a seminal L.A. punk band but in my opinion paved the way for many people who would have never thought of becoming musicians themselves.
 
Violence Girl covers her years growing up in East Los Angeles, a daughter of Mexican immigrants. It is in her youth that she starts to become aware of the disparagement of growing up poor and Mexican, from having to live in sub-quality housing to being ridiculed for not speaking English by unsympathetic schoolteachers. Alice grew up in a house full of love and was told by her father that she could become anything she wanted to be. Yet all the positive energy was for not as she had to witness years of abusive of her mother by the hand of her father.

In her teens, Alice love of music and education carries her through tough times. She discovers Glam Rock and starts venturing into Hollywood, where she would meet other like-minded youth. They would eventually not just become the pioneers of the L.A. punk scene, but of punk music in general. For a punk historian and a L.A. honk like myself, Alice’s stories of punk’s inception in Los Angeles are a real treat. Alice shows that it was misfit kids like her that created the origins of L.A. punk. It was a community that despite the differences in class, race, gender or sexuality that found a bond with each other. To me, that is what makes L.A. punk so influential worldwide. If you look at the origins of punk in other U.S. cities such as Chicago or D.C., you’ll see very little diversity.

The Bags were started as Alice and her friend Patricia wanted to start an all-girl band in the mists of all the male dominated bands. Although The Bags had male band mates, Alice’s songs and presence on stage influenced many women to start their own groups. The Bags as pushed punk in a faster, more chaotic style that was later adopted by the next wave of hardcore bands. The Bags, in the relatively brief history, manage to record a few singles and made an appearance in Penelope Spheeris iconic documentary, The Decline Of Western Civilization. For the movie, the band name was changed to The Alice Bag Band, as Patricia threaten Spheeris with a lawsuit if they used the name “The Bags” once she quit the band.

Alice concludes her book with stories from her post-Bags days. She continues to play music, graduates college and becomes a teacher. She also resolves issues with her father, who had become ill. She travels to Nicaragua post-revolution and works with youth there, getting an eye-opening perspective on how the rest of the world exists. So much more could have been written about Alice’s life, but perhaps that can be left for another book.

What is amazing about Alice is that not only that she paved the way for the rest that followed her in the punk scene and manage to get through college. She manage to accomplish all this in her teens and early twenties. Today, I witness youth today struggle with identity issues of not knowing what they want to be, thus living in suspended growth. More and more younger people live at home until they are in their late twenties with little ambition to leave. Certainly in Alice’s days it was cheaper to live in Los Angeles but like most of us at the time, we lived in places with less than satisfactory conditions and with multiple roommates to keep the rent low. But in the end, the standard of living that was compromised was a necessity to be a part of the adventure, which I feel today’s generation is missing out on.

On Tuesday, May 22nd at 8pm PST, I will be conducting an interview with Alice Bag on my radio show, Discos Inmigrantes. We will discuss her successful memoir, Violence Girl, which has her traveling across the world speaking to old fans and new fans alike and inspiring a whole new generation of artists. We will discuss her past, the whirlwind year since the release of her book and what it means to be a Chicana Feminist in 2012. Hear it live on radiosombra.org 8-10 PM PST

You can pick up a copy of Violence Girl At Amoeba Hollywood

Los Angeles Traffic: Listen Up -- It's Casual's "The Red Line," Directed by Jackass's Rick Kosick

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 10, 2012 09:46am | Post a Comment
Los Angeles traffic has driven Eddie Solis' and his hardcore punk duo It's Casual to the brink of madness...municipal outrage even. Dealing with the inequities of public transit in the most rawkin' way they know how, Its Casual has a new video for their song "The Red Line" and it's directed by photograher and Jackass Rick Kosick.

We highly recommend you check out their album The New Los Angeles. Their follow-up, The New Los Angeles II, made with producer Billy Anderson, will be out soon!

R.I.P. Jennifer Miro, Singer of San Francisco's Seminal Punk Band The Nuns

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 5, 2012 11:37pm | Post a Comment
Jennifer "Miro" Anderson, singer of San Francisco's early punk band The Nuns, passed away at the age ofthe nuns, jennifer miro anderson, dominatrix, mistress jennifer 54 on December 16th in New York City as a result of complications from cancer. 

Getting their start in Marin, The Nuns began performing in the San Francisco in 1976 when they made their debut at the Mabuhay Gardens. By 1978, they had a show at Winterland Ballroom with The Avengers and Sex Pistols. The band split just a year later, but reunited in 1986 and again in 1997 with a more goth rock sheen. By this point, Jennifer Miro had become a popular fetish model and an aspiring screenwriter. Eventually, she went to work for a law office.

Despite suffering from both liver and lung cancer, Miro denied conventional treatment and painkillers, opting for exercise and homeopathic paths. 

Here is a clip from The Nun’s show at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco in 1978.

What Do You Want for Xmas (Hanukkah / Kwanzaa / Festivus)? A Few Ideas from Around the Interwebs

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 16, 2011 05:00pm | Post a Comment
xmas christmas space baby jesus alien rocket ship ufo christ
Tis the season to freak out about what to get our loved ones.

It seems to get harder every year, as -- thanks to the internet -- the world becomes smaller and choice becomes more vast. How can you find that perfect gift for someone that not only has everything, but can get whatever they want online in a matter of minutes?

Here's the answer: outsmart them. Use this guide to scoop them on their own desires. They may not yet know they lust after these amazing items, but with the Amoeblog's help, you will reign victorious as this year's King / Queen of Christmas / Hanukkah / Kwanzaa / Festivus /  Winter Solstice.  

For your old school punk:
San Francisco’s seminal punk band Crime was  formed in 1976 Crime band shirt merch Johnny Strike San Francisco punkand ripped post-hippie San Francisco a metaphorical new one when they released their first (and many say Punk’s first) single“Hot Wire My Heart / Baby You're So Repulsive.” They mixed a rebellious and sexually-charged image (they were most often seen flaunting their vampiric, just-outta-rehab good looks in tight leather, regulation police uniforms, or old-time gangster duds) with their unique blend of intellectual and furious lo-fi rock and roll. Crime found local refuge at the now legendary Mabuhay Gardens, but became nationally notorious after playing a gig at San Quentin Penitentiary in full police uniforms. (Read more about them on the Amoeblog.)

Now, after many years, you can purchase official Crime merch directly from original member Johnny Strike and his business partner Faustino Mendonça. Bootleggers be damned! Get some stunning shirts, posters, and pins from the source!

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