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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Shannon Shaw

Posted by Amoebite, February 5, 2019 03:22pm | Post a Comment

Shannon Shaw - What's In My Bag? - Amoeba Music

We were delighted to have Bay Area indie/garage artist Shannon Shaw visit Amoeba Hollywood recently to talk about some of her current musical interests and a few of the records that shaped her tastes in our latest What's In My Bag? episode. "I found a box of tapes that changed my life," she told us. Among those beloved tapes were an OMD album, '80s skate thrash, and the oldies compilations Cruisin' that feature old radio DJ interludes. Having found an LP of Cruisin' 1960 at Amoeba, she waxed nostalgic about obsessively listening to those tapes for two years. "I feel privy to a slice of life that I missed." 

Shannon Shaw is a founding member of the eponymous Shannon and the Clams. After bassist/vocalist Shaw met guitarist Cody Blanchard at California College of the Arts in the late '00s, the Shannon In Nashvilleduo began performing their signature hybrid of classic garage, doo-wop, and old school R&B. The band's current lineup solidified with the recruitment of keyboardist Will Sprott and drummer Nate Mahan. The group's debut album, I Wanna Go Home, was released in 2009. Sleep Talk followed in 2011. Next came Dreams in the Rat House (2013), Gone by the Dawn (2015), and Onion (2018), which was produced by Dan Auerbach for his Easy Eye Sound label.

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Used Finds: OMD, Beach Boys, Pointer Sisters

Posted by Billy Gil, February 8, 2012 06:32pm | Post a Comment
Here’s a new feature where every so often I’ll pick out my favorite used LPs from recent finds. It should go without saying I got all of these for like, an average of five bucks a piece. So here it goes.
 
OMD – Dazzle Ships
(link to original issue CD)
 
I always liked OMD enough for their singles, especially “Enola Gay,” but I never really delved into their albums until this one, a mini masterpiece of whirring industrial synthesizers and indelible pop melodies. Some of OMD’s catchiest songs (“Genetic Engineering,” “Telegraph”) are interrupted by bits of shortwave broadcast played over oceanic synthesizers that lend the whole thing an eerie ambiance. It feels like listening to the radio on a submarine. There’s also a young band called Dazzle Ships; they’re really cool too.
 





The Beach Boys – Sunflower
(new LP)
 
Sunflower is maybe the last classic the Beach Boys made and is all the more ripe for rediscovering because its songs haven’t been played to death (it wasn’t a hit in the U.S.) and its tastefully layered production sounds great today on harmony-driven songs like “Forever” and “Cool, Cool Water,” fun ’70s rocker “Slip on Through” and, especially, “All I Wanna Do,” which may have helped invent shoegaze.
 









The Pointer SistersSpecial Things
 
I love everything about Special Friends. The sick bouncing basslines and horns on “Could I Be Dreamin’” and “Evil.” Burt Bacharach co-penned ballads like “Where Did the Time Go” that will absolutely kill you if you’re in the mood. Their outfits. But also this album has “He’s So Shy,” maybe their best song, which is like cotton candy for anyone with a yen for early ’80s synth-driven R&B a la Prince’s Dirty Mind.

The '80s List: Part 8

Posted by Amoebite, August 29, 2011 02:32pm | Post a Comment
OnJoan Jette day at Amoeba Hollywood I proclaimed that Aztec Camera's 1983 release High Land, Hard Rain was one of the best records of the '80s. This single statement eventually led to over 200 Amoebites ranking their top 10 favorite albums from the ‘80s.

From the beginning we realized that it was impossible for most of us to condense our favorites from all genres into a tiny top ten list. So, we limited our lists to Rock/Pop and its sub-genres like punk, metal, goth, and new wave. Even so, it was a difficult selection process because not only are there hundreds of amazing records to consider, there is also the added dynamic of time.

The '80s were a long time ago and the music has had many years to gestate. We have a deep sense of nostalgia and sentiment with these albums as our fondest memories are associated with them. These are albums we LOVE.

- Henry Polk

P.S. We'll be posting new additions to the '80s list project from Amoeba staff members on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. See all entries in our '80s list series.

P.P.S. The '80s List Book is available for sale at Amoeba Hollywood.


Kristen Frederick
The Dream SyndicateThe Days Of Wine & Roses (1982)
The Clash London Calling (1980)
The SmithsThe Smiths (1983)
Roxy Music Avalon (1980)
Ultravox – Vienna (1980)
The WaterboysA Pagan Place (1984)
Echo & BunnymenPorcupine (1983)
The Psychedelic FursTalk Talk Talk (1981)
New OrderPower, Corruption & Lies (1983)
OMD – Architecture & Morality (1981)

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The 80s List: Part 4

Posted by Amoebite, August 19, 2011 11:30am | Post a Comment
Grace JonesOne day at Amoeba Hollywood I proclaimed that Aztec Camera's 1983 release High Land, Hard Rain was one of the best records of the '80s. This single statement eventually led to over 200 Amoebites ranking their top 10 favorite albums from the ‘80s.

From the beginning we realized that it was impossible for most of us to condense our favorites from all genres into a tiny top ten list. So, we limited our lists to Rock/Pop and its sub-genres like punk, metal, goth, and new wave. Even so, it was a difficult selection process because not only are there hundreds of amazing records to consider, there is also the added dynamic of time.

The '80s were a long time ago and the music has had many years to gestate. We have a deep sense of nostalgia and sentiment with these albums as our fondest memories are associated with them. These are albums we LOVE.

- Henry Polk

P.S. We'll be posting new additions to the '80s list project from Amoeba staff members on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. See all entries in our ‘80s list series.

P.P.S. The '80s List Book is available for sale at Amoeba Hollywood.


Frankie Delmane
The WipersOver The Edge (1983)
Black FlagMy War (1984)
FangLandshark (1982)
The ClashLondon Calling (1980)
Redd KrossNeurotica (1987)
The ChillsBrave Words (1987)
The Go-BetweensLiberty Belle & The Black Diamond Express (1986)
Greg SageStraight Ahead (1985)
Celtic Frost Morbid Tales (1984)
The Lotus EatersNo Sense Of Sin (1984)

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(Wherein Spring Fever takes over the jukebox.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 28, 2011 04:25pm | Post a Comment

Well my little dreamlets, we’re ten days into Spring, and it’s already clear to me what music is going to carry me through into Summer – it’s all about synthetics. Synthpop, that is, of the late 70’s and early 80’s variety.

This amuses me, because for much of my life I detested a lot of the music I’m going to celebrate here. A lot of the hatred stemmed from being so unhappy in the 1980’s; by association, the music “sounded” like unhappiness. Think of it this way: When was the last time you were taking a shower and felt like listening to the soundtrack to Psycho? Exactly.

Some say that synthpop began when Giorgio Moroder teamed up with Donna Summer and created the hit single "I Feel Love." Calling this the “start” of synthpop is convenient, but an over-simplification, because so much came before that informed it. What can be said is that the song was influential, both in terms of inspiring artists who would go on to develop the synthpop genre, and give mainstream audiences a taste for it.

What follows are some synthpop songs that bring me joy. Many can be claimed by other sub-genres of music, but they're all related. Some are guilty pleasures – the sonic equivalent to a Snickers bar, in that they are bad for me, but make me feel great for the duration I’m imbibing – and others I stand by as solid accomplishments. I’m also putting a spell on them: listening to these songs will make you feel a little ticklish in the deepest part of your brain, which will result in your not hating your fellow man as much (even though they totally deserve your hate). Enjoy!

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