Amoeblog

Grant Hart: Yes, I Remember

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 3, 2017 06:59pm | Post a Comment

by Casey Dresser

Pap-boom-pap-boom-pap-boom, New Day Rising - the seminal, legendary, and absolutely classic Grant HartHüsker Dü post-hardcore masterpiece kicks off with a nice blast beat from Grant Hart before Bob Mould's swirling, fuzzy, and overdriven guitars and Greg Norton's precision dynamic bass take us where we are going for the next 40 minutes or so.

I immediately put this record on when I heard of Grant Hart's death on September 13th. It seemed like the right thing to do...

My friend Bret has a morbid fascination with people dying. Whenever someone even remotely famous dies, I get a text. They don't even have to have a Wikipedia page to warrant a "RIP" from ol' Bret ("Bill Smith, who was an extra on episode 4 of season 6 of House, passed away this morning. RIP."). I usually just ignore them; I don't care about most celebrities dying. It doesn't effect my life and I highly doubt they would be too bent out of shape if someone told them I had died. Grant was different though. Grant was still young, putting out relevant music, and surely had a lot more to give us. This one did effect my life and it made me sad.

Grant Hart was an extremely talented musician with a gift for melody and a tremendous aptitude for orchestration. He and Bob Mould met at Cheapo Records in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1979 and formed one of the greatest bands of the post-hardcore second (third?) wave punk scene that became a major name on the legendary mid-1980's SST roster. He wasn't just the drummer, he also wrote and sang about half the songs. He and Bob Mould were a Lennon-McCartney or a Jagger-Richards of the punk era - blazing new trails and writing some beautiful, innovative, and downright catchy songs along the way. They each wrote and sang their own songs and on their best albums it felt like each song was an attempt to one up the other guy. To top the previous song with a better one.

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