Amoeblog

Jules Lion

Posted by Whitmore, February 28, 2009 03:07pm | Post a Comment
The daguerreotype was the precursor to the modern photography process; an image is exposed directly onto a highly polished silver metal plate, its surface coated with silver halide particles deposited by iodine vapor-- a later advancement was the use of bromine and chlorine vapors to shorten the exposure time. The daguerreotype produced a negative image, but the mirrored surface of the plate reflects the captured image, making it appear positive once light is exposed to the photograph. Early experimenters had tinkered with the idea of photography for over a hundred years, but it was Louis Daguerre who finally perfected the technique in about 1839. Less then a year later the rich history of American photography began in New Orleans at #3 St Charles Street, in the private studio/residence of Jules Lion, "a freeman of color," who opened the first daguerreotype studio in New Orleans and one of the very first in the entire United States.
 
Born in 1810 in Paris, France, Jules Lion was the first of about fifty documented black daguerreotypists who operated galleries/studios in the first half of the 19th century in the U.S. He originally moved to New Orleans from France in 1837 where he was a lithographer and portrait painter -- at the Exposition of Paris of 1833 he was the youngest lithographer to be awarded an honorable mention. It’s believed that Lion returned briefly to Paris in 1839 and 1840 to study photography with Louis Daguerre. Upon his return Lion exhibited his first daguerreotypes in New Orleans in 1840; unfortunately only a couple of them have survived. By 1841 in New Orleans, he was lecturing on photography, co-founded an art school and was running a successful studio. Not much more is known of Jules Lion, except the occasional newspaper announcement and city records listing him as a professor of drawing at the College of Louisiana from 1852 to 1865. In his later years he returned to painting portraitures. Among his most famous commissions were portraits of President Andrew Jackson and naturalist John J. Audubon. Throughout his career he continued teaching and occasionally returning to Paris to exhibit his lithographs and daguerreotypes until his death in New Orleans in 1866.

Mardi Gras Mambo

Posted by Amoebite, February 26, 2009 04:08pm | Post a Comment
Mardi Gras Sign
Gris Gris Gumbo Ya Ya! It's carnival time again!

Mardi Gras is always a wonderful time at the old Amoeba, but this year the festivities were truly "marmalade!" More people attended than ever before, the floats were crazier, the music was funkier, and the Mardi Gras spirit was so strong some folks still haven't recovered. I saw a guy stumbling down Cahuenga covered in beads two days later... if it ain't the real thing, it's the closest you can get outside the French Quarter. If you were there, we love you; if you weren't, we wanna see you next year!

As usual, it snuck up on us again... we were still coughing from the flu and getting soaked with weeks of rain when we realized it was coming up on the calendar. Preparations kicked into high gear! We decorated the store in purple, gold and green, and then we redecorated it, and then we decorated it so much it was ridiculous. The PURPLE NURPLE krewe flung itself headfirst into float-making... the Yellow Submarine float made a battered but beautiful return, a sphinx & purple pyramid was set in motion, a tribute to recently deceased punkabilly pioneer Lux Interior of the Cramps (1948-2009), as well as an inexplicable float involving a space chicken surfing on a huge Dali-esque piano... at the last moment Karen dropped off a giant psychedelic timbale which this chicken was made to play like Tito Puente, and the floats were complete!


MEANWHILE... secret preparations were underway for the first ever Amoeba Irregular Marching Band! Led by Kim Pryor on trumpet and avant-garde sax player Becca, this motley ensemble worked up the spookiest, freakiest version of "When The Saints Go Marching In" we've ever heard! Augmented by the banjo of Matt Polley, a wheelchair-riding accordionista (Jada) and a second line anchored by Tom Wunder, Kris Konrad and Edythe, a truly celebratory zu-zu sound was pounded forth! It was left only to the Witch Queen of New Orleans, Mama Elicia, to howl wildly through a homemade megaphone and several feet of aluminum tubing and the sound was "ice cream."

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I feel like bootin' up -- The Take Fo' story

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 20, 2009 06:06pm | Post a Comment


Take Fo' Records
is a little known (outside of New Orleans) music label that truly broke ground with its motley roster of artists and progressive attitude, yet it's never received adequate recognition for its pioneering role in music. Whereas New Orleans's other big labels: Big Boy, Cash Money, Mobo, Parkway Pumpin', Untouchable, Tombstone and No Limit all seemed to consciously project a hard-as-nails image with tales of slangin', bangin', head bussin' and wig splittin', Take Fo' welcomed gangstas but also ball busters, dancer-cum-rappers, party starters and probably the first openly gay rapper. Despite the possible negative associations that might come with being part of this hip hop Island of Misfit Toys, the rappers on Take Fo' seemed unbothered and showed up on each others' albums in a show of courageous support.



 

Take Fo' evolved from the public access show Positive Black Talk that began in 1990 and was co-hosted by Earl J. Mackie. Their definition of "positive" wasn't necessarily in line with American mores at large, where violence is pretty much embraced and sexuality is incredibly repressed. Even in New Orleans, which is largely a lot more open-minded, not everyone appreciated Mackie's conception of positivity and he got grief from his pastor. But all of the show's guests conveyed messages of self-empowerment in their own ways, even if they ruffled some feathers along the way.





In 1992, Positive Black Talk lost its grant and Mackie hosted a dance at a local high school to raise funds for the show. The centerpiece was meant to be Da'Sha Ra' (pictured above) but a special ed teacher asked if he could warm up the crowd. After half an hour of captivating the audience, Henry "Henry the Man" Holden and Mackie began to formulate a new idea. After raising more in one night than the show had in two years, they switched tracks and soon Positive Black Talk Inc. morphed into Take Fo' Records and the show was no more. It took a couple months of pressure to get the warm up act, DJ Jubilee, to sign, as he already was commited to teaching and coaching, but he ultimately did and became the label's biggest star. Joined by partner Elden Anderson, the new label operated in the back of Mackie's father's roofing business. Henry the Man and E-Jay handled the production for the tracks and the label's ranks grew as more artists signed.


In the early '90s, Take Fo' quickly became one of the two labels that most epitomized Bounce music, the other being Mobo. Cash Money and Big Boy were both then primarily focused on producing a gangstafied Bounce variant, pioneered by U.N.L.V., who coined the term Gangsta Bounce. No Limit, having started in Richmond, California, was decidedly straight gangsta, albeit with a southern flavor courtesy of the second line-influenced production of Beats By the Pound. Jubilee's music, on the other hand, was in the vein of the Bounce's pioneers, TT Tucker & DJ Irv, DJ Jimi and Everlasting Hitman-- mixing the triggaman beat, the brown beat, calling out dance moves and shouting out wards, projects and occassionally neighboring southern states. "Stop Pause," his debut single, sold 30,000 copies and gave the label its first hit. By the mid-to-late '90s, Take Fo's New Orleans neighbors had all but completely dropped the Bounce aspect of their music but Take Fo' kept wobbling into the new millenium, ultimately spawning Bounce's shrill, gay offshoot, Sissy Rap.


By the late '90s, with the nationwide ascendancy of southern rap, the increasingly marginalized old record labels carpetbagged it down to N.O. hoping to exploit the city's East and West coast obliterating scene. First, Priority signed a deal with No Limit, then Universal signed a major deal with Cash Money. In 1999, DJ Jubilee signed a deal with Tommy Boy but they didn't allow him to record and eventually freed him. Meanwhile, Big Easy Distributing, Take Fo’s distributor, went out of business. That same year, Take Fo’s promoter, the legendary Bobby Marchan, also passed away.

Take Fo' famously ended up going to court several times over the years. In one case, DJ Jubilee sued Juvenile, alledging that the Juve's "Back That Azz Up" ripped off Jube's "Back That Ass Up" based on the claim that he'd originated the dance at block parties. As much as I like Jubilee and feel bad that he's never achieved anywhere near the fame he deserves, I have to say he didn't really have a case since he wasn't suing that his dance had been ripped of, but that his song had. Mannie Fresh, for his part, admitted that "Back That Azz Up" was inspired by Jubilee's song, but with significantly varied production and even the lyrical conversion of what was a dance chant into more sexual territory, the court ruled in Juvenile's favor. A few years later Take Fo' sued Master P for breach of contract, alledging that No Limit failed to adequately pay Take Fo' in their joint venture with Choppa and I guess they settled for an undisclosed sum.


In 2001, Take Fo' became The New Take Fo'. After Katrina, the label relocated to Houston but returned by 2009, when they celebrated 17 years in the game. Whilst they may be fairly obscure, they've shown remarkable perseverance, a defiant open-mindedness, and created some classic music along the way.

Partial Take Fo' timeline/discography


1994 - Flesh & Blood - Flesh & Blood



1995 - Da'Sha'Ra - Still Bootin' Up, DJ Jubilee - Stop Pause, DJ Jubilee - DJ Jubilee & the Cartoon Crew


1996 - War Time featuring The Hideout - The Album,  Big Al & Lil Tee - B***h You Know Who I Am, DJ Jubilee - 20 Years in the Jets


 

1997 - 2-Sweet - Actin' Bad, Willie Puckett - Doggie Hop, DJ Jubilee - Get Ready, Ready!



(original Choppa Style - poor quality)


(No Limit remake - medium quality)

     

1998 - Willie Puckett - Million Dollar Hot Boy, DJ Jubilee - Take it to the St. Thomas

   

1999 - Katey Red & Dem Hoes - Melpomene Block Party, K.C. Redd [RIP] & the Shake 'em Up Girls - It's a G-Thang, Lisa Amos - Cause You Love Me

 Katey REd Y2 Katey 

2000 - DJ Jubilee - Do Yo Thing Girl!, Katey Red - Y2 Katy, Tec-9 - Ready 4 War



   

2001 - Choppa - Choppa Style, DJ Duck - Duck Remixxes, Junie Bezel -
That's How Mess Get Started

Post Script: Kasey "K.C. Redd" Segue was shot to death in 2006. Katey Red filmed her first video in 2011, for "Where Da Melph At?"

*****

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A Year in the Life of Amoeba Hollywood -- Year of Sanitation, the Potato, the Frog, the Planet Earth, Languages, Intercultural Dialogue & the Rat

Posted by Eric Brightwell, December 30, 2008 01:33am | Post a Comment
 

2008 The Year in Review

movies set in 2008

Well, first of all, I’d like to point out what 2008 wasn’t. I mean, probably 2000 and 2001 are the most famous years of the oughts in speculative fiction. However, 2008 also piqued the imagination of Science-Fictionalists. Silent Running didn't resemble my 2008 much, although something kept knocking the ficus in my back yard over which did make me angry. I didn't hear about anything that fit in with the prophecies offered in Jason X. But perhaps no speculation about what 2008 would be like was the 2006 film, The Lake House. I mean, come on. They really thought that in just two years we'd have magic mailboxes that would allow us to send love letter to the past. People get real!


Cassandra moaning about something                                                                  I don't know

No, 2008 was more like most years than all the hysterical Cassandras out there would have us believe. Global warming fuelling massive natural disasters. Political scandals of sexual and corrupt natures were rampant to the Left and Right. Car bombs and suicide bombs killed scores daily. Unending oil wars waged in the Middle East. Somali was insane. There was horrendous, state-sponsored terrorism in Burma, Darfur, East Turekstan, Palestine, Tibet and the Democratic Republic of Congo (where the death toll is estimated to be around 5.4 million. Yet presumably because their main resource is cobalt, the world turns a blind eye to the most destructive war since WWII). Like William Joel sang in his Baby Boomers-exonerating hit, “We didn’t start the fire.”

                   *sigh* kids today                                                              omg we're having stove-top at 5:00 lolz

Sure, there were new problems that hadn’t been burning since the world’s been turning. Record high gas prices and a global financial crisis are all anyone in the news will talk about these days and almost all wrap-ups of the year end with an utterance of “good riddance.” As my generation's Billy Joel, Silkk the Shocker, sang, "It ain't my fault." But what about the good stuff? Despite Americans being morbidly obsese, our life expectancy reached a new high this year and cases of stroke and heart disease actually dropped. The divorce rate reached its lowest point as women everywhere decided to wait until after junior high school to tie the knot. What about all the cyber-bullying youth, with their hideous hoodies and the constant texting as they try to find out where the rainbow parties... not to mention their ending of every sentence with a skin-crawling “lol?” Well the juvenile crime rate has reached its lowest level in 25 years as kids today commit most of their crimes on the streets of Vice City. It even turns out all that texting is just their attempt to co-ordinate with their friends so that they can eat Stovetop Stuffing as much as possible. The sweatshirts are hideous though.

                       Hell in a handbasket                                         The hallmark of the Summer of Love - race riots   
 
What’s more, despite all the depressing coverage about a handbasket being used carry the world into the firey maw of Moloch, there are actually fewer active wars taking place on Earth right now than ever before. Violent crime in the US continues to drop to lows not seen since crime statistics were first tallied back in the good old days of the Vietnam War, the Boston Strangler, wars in the Middle East, widespread race riots and apartheid -- a year that Baby Boomers affectionately refer to as “The Summer of Love.” So even as local news reporters are sent further and further to find evidence of society’s inevitable collapse and Koreatown corners are filled with crazy old ladies shouting into megaphones about the end times, I believe that things are slowly moving in the right direction.

 
2008 at Amoeba

Amoeba was perhaps a respite from the topsy-turvy coo-coo crazy world outside. Amoeba.com soothed our souls with the hilarious and informative writings of its bloggers. There are also webcasts, the Music We Like section (wherein scads of CDs are available for $10.98 or less), free-downloads for those feeling the pinch, footage of our beloved in-store performances, photos, interviews, contests. I mean, if you’re reading this, you probably know a lot of that already, but take some time to peruse the site.


Gabriela showing off the Music We Like section

And don’t forget about the store itself. There were many changes afoot here too. First the DVD department added a Movies We Like section where our staff of all stripes recommend movies they truly love. Check out Dave's Raves, Eric B., erc, Gillian's Picks, Matt's Selections, Phil's Phile, Reece's Pieces, Simon Says (The Master of Movies), Tiffany, T-K- and many more. Once you've got a taste for their tastes, it's a great way to pick up something that comes highly recomended from your favorite cineaste. Shortly after the mezzanites made their section, the followers in the Jazz room followed -- but they did the mezzanine movie staffers one better by all growing or retaining facial hair. And, in a major coup, they moved the Experimental section from the Rock floor to their room in the back.
 

Bike enthusiasts and small car owners didn't feel the "pinch at the punch"

The “Winds of January sigh and moan” crooned Bing, although it felt like June because he was in love. For the rest of us, January marked oil barrels hitting $100 for the first time, ushering in 2008 on a sour note. And yet, like many of the coming obstacles that we faced, there was a silver lining. Americans actually drove less. And new car buyers overcame their fears that good mileage was unmanly and started buying sensible cars... which weren’t coming out of Detroit.
 
 
“While friends cry o're their bones unburied /Go sighing through the north east winds/ These cold days of February” sang the love ‘em or hate ‘em Incredible String Band. Kosovo declared its independence over the objections of some major global forces. But all was quiet on the Amoeba front aside from the indescribable in-stores from the Kids of Widney High and Kimya Dawson.

 
In my favorite song by Antonio Carlos Jobim, “Águas de Março,” the bossa nova giant sang “É a chuva chovendo, é conversa ribeira. Das águas de março, é o fim da canseira,” which may mean something completely awful. It could be about Julius Caesar being stabbed 23 times on the Ides -- I don’t know -- but Portuguese makes everything sound soothing. The only stabbing at Amoeba in March was the DJ stylings of Bronx’s Pete Rock, who played an in-store. So did the Welsh/Buckeye collaboration Neon Neon and Floridian murder balladeer Jim White.

Amoeba also toppedLos Angeles Magazine's 64 Greatest Things about LA list, edging out the competition which seemed to be mostly made-up of west side eateries that I’ve never heard of but assume are great places for celebrity worshippers. For the non-West Siders, they gave us "Taco Trucks" and "the Watts Towers" which I'm sure the writers are big fans of.
 
At the end of the month, the light finally reached earth from an explosion that occurred 7.5 billion light years away. Never before had an event observable to the human eye occurred so far away but unfortunately, no one was watching.

In February, Amoeba also celebrated Mardi Gras, as we always do -- in style.
 
“Still fall the April rain and the valley’s filled with pain,” Deep Purple portentously noted. But, whilst the valley may’ve been filled with pain, Amoeba is located safely on the other side of the hills where all was good. Peanut Butter Wolf, possessor of incredibly esoteric vinyl, played an in-store shortly after blessing us with Ladies First, a “Female Rap Mix CD” which mixed tracks by 30 mostly-unknown female rappers.
April 19th was Record Store Day, celebrated by hundreds of indie music stores across the US. At Amoeba Hollywood it was observed with gift certificate giveaways, a commemorative t-shirt, prizes and guest DJ sets from Peanut Butter Wolf and the Donnas. Five days later, the Kiwi duo/TV stars known as Flight of the Conchords played an in-store  to a diverse, enormous and rabid crowd who came from far and who lined up for hours to be treated to their comical songs. 

 
May is supposed to be the month when flowers are brought forth by March winds and April showers. 2008’s May, however, was marked instead by horrible natural disasters. Cyclone Nargis killed over 130,000 people in Burma and then, a little over a week later, the Chingdu earthquake killed almost 70,000 in Sichuan. On a smaller scale, the final HD DVDs were released in the US, the disaster-themed Twister and the disasterously-reviewed P.S. I Love You. Shortly afterward, the plug was pulled on the format. If there was a silver lining in all this, it was for those Xbox360 owners who can now by the HD titles for $7.99 and less! And if you find 3 red tag titles for $4.99, you get another of equal price for free!

 
Back before he was an MTV staple with his band, Cracker, David Lowery successfully rhymed June and moon (but not spoon) when he sang, “And the harvest moon top reign in the sky (now that it's June).” He was, of course, wrong about the timing, as the Harvest Moon occurs in September. June’s moon is known as the Strawberry moon, the Rose moon, the Honey moon or the Mead moon. It’s a long way from June to September, but over in Santa Monica on the Pier, the Twilight Dance Series brings free concerts throughout that period. This year, at Amoeba’s booth there, $3000 was raised for VillagePace, Communities for a Better Environment, One Kid One World and the Surfrider Foundation.

At the Skirball Cultural Center, Bob Dylan's American Journey, 1956-1966 ran. It featured more than 160 Dylan artifacts including handwritten lyrics, concert posters and a recording of his never commercially released first concert.  
 
“But I don't even know now and June becomes July” sang forgotten Weller-worshiping dad rockers, Ocean Colour Scene. And although July’s arrival left the Brummie ex-Baggies confused, two things were certain about the Dog Days. The pre-commercial Grunge pioneers the Melvins sludgily took the Amoeba stage, and former Y Kant Tori Read frontwoman Tori Amos signed copies of Comic Book Tattoo, a book containing 51 stories inspired by particular Amos songs.
 
 “I said August is all that I know, It’s with me wherever I go.” Typical drug-induced nonsense or inscrutable prophecy from Love’s Arthur Lee? Did Lee, like Tom Clancy, know that Georgia would invade South Ossetia and Abkhazia? I don’t know, but it happened two years and five days after Lee’s passing. In a two-faced application of US foreign policy, the US backed the Georgian aggressors and Condeleezza Rice uttered one of her funniest condemnations without a trace of irony that, “[Russia can’t] threaten a neighbor, occupy a capital, and overthrow a government, and get away with it. “ No, only we can do that, Silly Rabbit!
The skies were sunnier at “The One-Eyed City” (as I once heard a child refer to Amoeba). Brian Wilson rolled up in Caddie and did a signing. And Matthew Sweet power-popped for his fans and a black-haired crowd rapturously took in the breathless vocal stylings of pescetarian from the plains, Conor Oberst and his Mystic Valley Band.
 
“But the days grow short when you reach September,” wrote Maxwell Anderson. Probably not short enough for Lehman Brothers, who filed for bankruptcy that month. But Amoeba-fans found much to enjoy during the long September nights with instores from the Pretenders and Lee Scratch Perry as well as frequent video game-featured local rapper, MURS. The Tuareg and Wodaabe musicians in Etran Finatawa played an instore that showed why they’re quickly making a name for themselves in Niger’s music scene.
 
October, and the trees are stripped bare, of all they wear, do I care?” Irish poet/activist Bono once asked. Many people did care about the massive global financial crisis. It wasn’t all gloom and doom in the season of the witch, however. From the 9th to the 13th, Freewaves presented the Hollywould Festival in which 160 experimental videos, films and media art transformed the normally normally-best-avoided Walk of Fame into a mostly free showcase for experimental, global art. 
 

October also marked the release of Guitar Hero – World Tour. With the Amoeba stage appearing as one of the performance venues, Amoeba was dragged into video game world. Finally! Now we stock a variety of games for all the major formats including PCs, Macs, PSP, XBOX360, PS3, DS, Gameboy and even, on occasion, Dreamcast as well as Sega Genesis and NES cartridges.
 

Just in time. Studies have shown that sales of video games (as well as make-up, lottery tickets and booze) have increased in these economically trouble times as people turn to alternative ways of cheering themselves up.  

In October, fans were also treated to an in-store by Ralph Nader-supporter, Jackson Browne. I forgot that he wrote Nico’s “These Days.”  

 

A ginger Hoosier once sagely pointed out that “Nothing lasts forever, even cold November rain.” Indeed, November rain proved ephemeral as did the events that occurred that month. Everyone was glued to their sets on election night and witnessed the election of the US’s first half-black (and, less discussed, half-white) president. Water was discovered on Mars. The Donnas stopped by the store to promote their new record and tell us what’s in their bag. One person presumably not thrilled with the election of a Democratic president was cryptic, Missoulian filmmaker David Lynch. He stopped by Amoeba and at least eased fans’ garmonbozia by autographing copies of his Lime Green Set, a mysterious box set full of wonderful things (tiny old people not included).


We do mail order now... and we changed our window display

Amoeba also started treating customers to our brand new mail order service. Now you can have Amoeba ship most of our product to your doorstep, wherever you live in the world. Falkland Islands? We’ve got you! Kenya? Why, yes we ken. We didn’t forget about you, Andorra. You can email us, fax your list or send a telegram and our personal shoppers will take care of the rest.


I went to New Orleans in November. I went to New Orleans a few weeks ago. If you just go to the tourist areas of the French Quarter, the Garden District, Carrollton or St. Charles you’d think that New Orleans looks great, maybe even better than before. But stroll up to Barrone and look north and it’s jawdropping how bad it remains. I saw rebuilding and restoration in the 17th to the 9th wards but there is a long way to go. Luckily, Amoeba continues to host auctions the first Saturday of each month, where you can but all sorts of odd merchandise and hear the Spin Doctors-centric comedy stylings of auctioneer, Brently Heilbron. Thus far, the auctions have aised over $200,000 dollars in aid, $26,000 this year. In addition to helping in rebuilding of New Orleans, a portion goes to global environmental relief charities.
 

Los Angeles in December
 
“This is my December/This is my snow covered home/This is my December /This is me alone.” The lyrics of Linkin Park seemed to perfectly capture the beauty and sadness of Los Angeles’s brief rainy season. The air grew crisp and clear and Angelenos were treated to the sight of snow in the mountains. Macca’s record, Amoeba’s Secret Gig, (recorded at an historic in-store in 2007) earned a couple of Grammy nominations. Fuzzy and furry local space rockers, Darker My Love played an instore. And Amoeba’s legendary (and also furry) Jingle Cat spread holiday cheer, this year accompanied by Jingle Baby. It was also the season for our holiday party, where I was blessed with the company of the enigmatic lovely, Ngoc Nguyen.

 
2009

So while I don’t share the relentless negativity of all the newcasters on public radio who basically bid 2008 “good riddance,” I am pretty sure 2009 will be better.  Keep checking the website because some major changes are coming. I promise they’ll be amazing and if I’m wrong, you can buy me lunch.
 

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FIENDIN' FOR THE DIRTY SOUTH: NEW ORLEANS' FIEND

Posted by Billyjam, December 2, 2008 11:40am | Post a Comment

fiendReading yesterday's great Eric Brighwell Amoeblog about New Orleans rapper Lil Slim reminded me of another great and oft slept-on New Orleans rap artist -- Fiend, whom I first met back in the nineties when he initially hooked up with Master P's No Limit label, and with whom I last talked around this time last year when he released his recommended career retrospective CD on Priority Mr. Whomp Whomp: The Best of Fiend (look for it and other Fiend releases at Amoeba Music).

That best-of collection, which features collaborations from the likes of Master P, MIa X, Snoop Dogg, Mac, and Kane & Abel, ably displays Fiend's trademark gruff, growling, gravelly Nawleans rap drawl and the rapper's edgy lyrical style, coupled with his skill for creating killer hooks (often behind-the-scenes, fueling others' success including Silkk the Shocker, Snoop Dogg, and Master P for whom he heavily contributed to the runaway MTV/crossover hit "Make Em Say Uh").

Fiend initially earned his Rakim inspired name (as in "Microphone Fiend") coming up as a distinctive young hip-hop voice in both New Orleans' 3rd Ward and 17th Ward Districts.  Born Richard Jones, he grew up in what is known as the Hollygrove area, where, from his early teens onwards he spent any free time, "Making music whenever and wherever I could. I would record all over...at people's houses," he told me, citing as among his early the best of fiend mr whomp whompinfluences: Rakim, Con Funk Shun, Earth Wind & Fire, Stevie Wonder, Curtis Mayfield, Big Daddy Kane, and Public Enemy. However even more profound an influence on his craft and his life was the sudden death of his younger brother Kevin, who was killed when Fiend was only sixteen years of age.

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