Amoeblog

15th Annual Festival of Film Noir Kicks Off Friday at The Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, April 2, 2013 11:59pm | Post a Comment


This Friday, April 5th, kicks off the 15th Annual Festival Of Film Noir at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood.  Things get moving fast with a Cy Enfield double, Try And Get Me (aka The Sound Of Fury) and Hell Drivers. The Film Noir Foundation's newly restored print of Try And Get Me should be a stunner- not available on DVD, this is rare glimpse into Enfield's U.S. career which was prematurely derailed due to HUAC blacklisting bullshit.  Hell Drivers is a Rank Organization picture featuring Irish beauty Peggy Cummins, best known for her roles in Gun Crazy and Night Of The Demon.

Saturday brings a great pair of Hollywood damage tales in Sunset Boulevard and The Other Woman.  Needing no introduction, Sunset Boulevard's brilliance never seems to diminish, it's depiction of desperation and delusion seems applicable to every generation of former greats and their hangers on.    The Other Woman features the criminally under rated Cleo Moore as a scheming second string actress who gets involved in a blackmail plot that goes awry.  Those of you unfamiliar with Ms. Moore should check out the Bad Girls Of Film Noir, Vol 2 DVD set, we often have used copies for sale at the Hollywood Amoeba.




The weekend ends with a double feature that I am very upset at having to miss.  Not on DVD noir oddity Repeat Performance screens with He Walked By Night, making April 7th an unofficial Richard Basehart day.  Both Sunset Boulevard and He Walked By Night offer some amazing LA location shots, HWBN captured by the amazing cinematographer John Alton.



15th Annual Film Noir Festival 
at
the Egyptian Theater 
6712 Hollywood Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90028-4605
(323) 466-3456

All shows start at 7:30pm.


Friday, April 5th
Try And Get Me/ Hell Drivers

Saturday, April 6th
Sunset Boulevard/ The Other Woman

Sunday, April 7th
Repeat Performance/ He Walked By Night








Sunset Boulevard Trailer

El Haru Kuroi-Canta Gallo

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 25, 2013 07:30am | Post a Comment

The name, El Haru Kuroi, is a cultural mash-up.It's a mix of grammatically incorrect Japanese and Spanish. They wanted to be called “Black Spring” in Japanese (It should be Kuroi Haru) and the “El” was added when people said they should have a Spanish name to their band because the band's lyrics were mostly in Spanish. Their latest release, Canta Gallo, is nothing short of brilliant. The influences that make El Haru Kuroi are not hard to pinpoint, yet put together they way they do makes for a sound that is all their own. The influence of Brazil’s Tropicalia movement weighs heavy on them, yet much like those artists involved in that movement, El Haru Kuroi adapted the music they grew up on and took the essence. The result is a haunting mixture of Bossa Nova and Boleros mixed with urgency of post-punk groups like Gang Of Four and Fugazi.

Singer/Guitarist Eddika Organista is the daughter of a Mexican musician who played in many Tropical groups. Most of the music Eddika’s father enjoyed was in Spanish, but he was also a fan of Brazilian music, Bossa Nova in particular. The sound of the Brazilian artists singing in Portuguese resonated strongly with a young Eddika, who was already fluent in both Spanish and English and playing guitar by age eleven. She found herself mimicking the sound of Brazilian singers when she sang. This led her to study Portuguese in school. She started to discover other Brazilian artists that went beyond the Bossa Nova singers that her father favored. At the age of seventeen, she is discovered the Tropicalia movement that started in Brazil in the late 60’s and in particular, her world was blown wide open by the discovery of Caetano Veloso. The influence of Veloso’s work on Eddika’s songwriting and musicianship is undeniable, but it goes beyond imitation. She manages to capture the soul of Caetano rather than his sound, the mixture of beauty and darkness that permeates her songs whether she is writing in English, Spanish or Portuguese.Organista's ability to sing in three languages creates options for the group. Language becomes part of the music, with each language chosen for what works best in the song. The rhythm section of Dominic Rodriguez and Michael Ibarra adapt to the whims of Organista’s imagination. Rodriguez imaginative percussive style works with Organista’s gritty yet breezy guitar tone. Ibarra hold them all together with a playing that resembles Charles Mingus when he played support rather than lead. It was an underrated talent of Mingus and one that Ibarra shares with him.  Lyrically, Organista’s metaphoric lyrics recall the beauty and pain of Caetano Veloso and Agustin Lara writing without imitation. Each song is pure heartbreak blues, even when decorated in sweet melodies.

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Secret Society of the Sonic Six April / May West Coast Tour Dates!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 24, 2013 03:00pm | Post a Comment

California Fool's Gold -- Exploring The Byzantine-Latino Quarter

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 12, 2013 10:57pm | Post a Comment
WE ARE EACH OF US ANGELS WITH ONE WING 

Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of The Byzantine-Latino Quater
Los Angeles's Byzantine-Latino Quarter is neighborhood and commercial corridor that straddles the larger neighborhoods of Harvard Heights and Pico-Union as well as the larger Midtown districts of Wilshire Center to the north and Mid-City to the south. The Quarter is centered along Pico Boulevard between South Hobart Boulevard to the west and South Alvarado Boulevard to the east.



EARLY HISTORY

The westernmost border of Los Angeles, as established by the Spanish in 1781, was along what's now Hoover Boulevard. The land to the west, through the Spanish and subsequent Mexican period were public lands. The land remained a mixture of pastures and farmland for decades after California became part of the US in 1848.


PICO HEIGHTS


Craftsman bungalows


One of the first neighborhoods to develop west of Hoover was the 280 acre Pico Heights Tract. In 1887, at the height of a land boom, the Electric Railway Homestead Association divided the land between Pico and 9th Street, and west of Vermont into 1,210 lots. Most of the lots along Pico were purchased by J.R. Millard and it quickly developed into a fashionable suburb characterized by stately Craftsman homes and a wealthy, white, Protestant population. Many of the new inhabitants were Downtown business owners and the short distance between work and home was a short ride on the newly-established Pico Heights Electric Railway, which also opened in 1887.

The growing community, sometimes referred to as Pico Heights Village with a bit of dreamy embellishment, was annexed by the city of Los Angeles in 1896. Along with Arlington Heights and The University District, it became a Southwest Los Angeles neighborhood (a region that vanished as the city expanded).

As Pico Heights aged, more and more of the wealthy residents moved further west and their void was largely filled by working class whites. By 1919 it was home to about 100 Japanese-American families, who though often wealthier and more educated than their white counterparts, were subject to racist, sometimes violent hostility. The Los Angeles County Anti-Asiatic Society formed the Electric Home Protective Association, a discriminatory group largely comprised of Germans and Austrians (under increased scrutiny and suspicion after World War I) and Catholics who were united by anti-Japanese racism.


VICTORIA THEATER


Victoria Theatre today (2012)


Around 1914, the 700-seat Victoria Theatre opened on Pico Boulevard. At some point around the 1960s it was gutted and converted into a dance hall. The theater appeared in the 1977 Rudy Ray Moore vehicle Petey Wheatstraw. In 1981, punk band Circle One and others played a concert there.


A mixed-use, multiple unit residency built in 1924


The discriminatory second California Alien Land Law passed in 1920, specifically to target ongoing Japanese immigration. Property in Pico Heights nonetheless (or because of anti-Japanese discrimination) continued to decline in monetary values. Eastern Europeans, Mexicans, and Japanese increasingly inhabited newly-constructed multiple family residences.


Bishop Conaty, Our Lady of Loretto High School


In 1922, a Japanese Methodist congregation attempted to build a new church in the area and crashed against white hostility. Meanwhile, the Los Angeles Catholic Girls' High School opened in 1923 (later re-named Bishop Conaty, Our Lady of Loretto High School). One of the pleasing ironies is that Los Angeles was sold to WASPs as "The white spot of America" but is now quite possibly the most diverse city in the galaxy. Though I couldn't find statistics just for the B-LQ, the population of Pico-Union was, as of the 2010 census, roughly 85% Latino (mostly Mexican and Salvadoran), 8% Asian (mostly Korean), 3% black, and only 3% white.



Sunnyside Presbyterian Church


The diversity can not only be seen in the storefronts, signage and restaurants but the neighborhood's churches as well. In 1930, a church opened that is now The Sunnyside Presbyterian Church, a Korean-American church (as are Korean Evangelical Nah Sung, Korean Southern Presbyterian, and The Korean Sae Han Presbyterian Church). Another church in the neighborhood caters to Samoans (the Samoan Community Christian Church). Spanish speakers are served by Rios de Agua Via,  Iglesia Pentecostes El Ultimo, and Ministerios de Restauracion.


St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church

The oldest, and one of the prettiest church in the neighborhood is St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church, built in 1905, and also known as Iglesia Santo Tomás Apóstol. Most well-known, probably, is Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral


GREEK TOWN

Along with Little Italy and largely Jewish Brooklyn Heights, or Little Mexico (Chavez Ravine); Greek Town is one of the now vanished ethnic enclaves of Los Angeles. In the early 20th century, Los Angeles's Greek population was focused around what's now the Fashion District (in Downtown) and Boyle Heights (in the Eastside). Around the mid-20th century, much of the Greek population was centered around the intersection of Pico and Normandie, an area still home to several Greek institutions.


C & K IMPORTING AND PAPA CRISTO'S




Papa Cristo's


Sam Chrys opened C & K Importing opened in 1948 with the focus on Greek imports. In 1968 (I believe) the business expanded into a restaurant by Sam's son, Cristo, with Papa Cristo's. I still haven't eaten there although I've picked up falafel mix, baklava, and restina from the market. Papa Cristo's Catering & Greek Taverna was established in 1990.


SAINT SOPHIA GREEK ORTHODOX CATHEDRAL


St Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral

The other major remaining vestige of Greek Town is the aforementioned Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral. The church was built in 1952 by Charles P. Skouras (designed by Kalionzes, Klingerman & Walker), then head of the National Theaters chain. Charles and his brothers, Spyros Skouras and George Skouras were Greek-American Hollywood hopefuls who'd moved to Los Angeles from St. Louis, Missouri. Spyros eventually became president of 20th Century Fox. George became the head of United Artists. Earlier, in 1932, the Skouras brothers jointly took over the management of over 500 Fox-West Coast theaters. Charles repaid God for his intervention by erecting a cathedral to him in Greek Town.


GANGS OF PICO HEIGHTS


Playboys Malos   


 Jesús Malverde (patron saint of drug smugglers)  

     West Side 18th Street Hoover St Locos

Likely the oldest gang in the neighborhood is the Westside Playboy Malos. The gang's roots begin in the 1950s, when Southern Califas Latin Playboys Car Club formed at a home near the intersection of Pico and Fedora. Their tags and tattoos often include representations of the Playboy Magazine logo and they're sometimes referred to as conejos. The other main active gang in the neighborhood is the 18th Street Gang, who were established in Pico Heights around 1965. The local click, Hoover Locos, is one of the oldest.


PILGRIM TOWER


Pilgrim Tower for the Deaf & Elderly

In 1968, the Pilgrim Tower for the Deaf & Elderly opened. I find it worth mentioning because I'm a fan of low-rise architecture and its one of the few buildings in the neighborhood that's more than two stories tall.


PICO-UNION

Pico Heights was seen as having been in a decades-long decline by some and in 1970, the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) of the city of Los Angeles decided to give the neighborhood a fresh start by changing its name to "Pico-Union." The Pico-Union Neighborhood Council (PUNC) was formed the same year.


LITTLE CENTRAL AMERICA





In the 1970s, the US-inflamed Central American Crisis made life for tens of millions of Central Americans. As a result, thousands of Guatemalans, Hondurans, Nicaraguans, and Salvadorans fled the appalling violence in their homelands and resettled in Pico-Union and nearby Koreatown and Westlake. By 1996, Pico-Union was heavily Salvadoran and the area was often referred to as "Pequeño Centroamérica" or "Nuevo Cuscatlán."


MASSIVE ATTACK'S "UNFINISHED SYMPATHY" VIDEO



In 1991, singer Shara Nelson walked from the intersection of South New Hampshire Avenue and Pico to the intersection of Pico and Dewey Avenue for the filming of Massive Attack's music video for "Unfinished Sympathy." 


BYZANTINE-LATINO QUARTER

Pico-Union was one of the areas hardest hit by 1992 LA Riots outside of South Los Angeles. Increasingly seen as a Central American barrio, in 1995 a coalition of local churches, schools, residents, and merchants from the western portion of the neighborhood met to address their concerns. The product of their efforts was the 1997 creation and designation of the Byzantine-Latino Quarter, a nod to both its Latino majority and Greek period.



Byzantine-Latino Quarter neon sign

The Byzantine-Latino Quarter Business Improvement District installed a large, "Byzantine-Latino Quarter" neon sign atop one of the neighborhood's only other low-rise building (then a public storage facility) in 2001. There are faded banners along Pico and public art advertising its new name. A former Pacific Bell building is now home to Jane B. Eisner Middle School and a Byzantine-Latino Quarter Community Center.


L.A. GREEK FEST


Since 1999, the Byzantine-Latino Quarter has hosted the annual L.A. Greek Fest in September, an event which attracts some 40,000 people.


BLQ EATS AND DRINKS


Dinos' Chicken and Burgers



Guatemalteca Market


There are several places to eat in the Byzantine-Latino Quarter: Acapulco TortilleriaCafe Las MargaritasCanaan Restaurant, El Colmao, Conchitas Restaurant, Dino's Chicken and Burgers, Graciela's, El Grullense Restaurante, Guapo's Market, Guatemalteca MarketHuicho's Bakery, Mateo's Ice Cream & Fruit Bars, El Nuevo Picasso, Pan Victoria, the aforementioned Papa Cristo's, Paqueteria King Express, Pollos El Brasero, Restaurante El Mirador, Las 7 Regiones, Texis Restaurant And Entertainment, and El Valle Oaxaqueno. There are a couple of bars too; Mike's Hideout Bar and Pulgarcito Sports Bar.


Inside Tiendas de Mariposa mini mall


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*****

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Tickets on Sale at Amoeba Hollywood in March

Posted by Amoebite, March 5, 2013 03:14pm | Post a Comment

Tickets at AmoebaAmoeba Hollywood regularly sells tickets to local shows, with the added bonus of charging low service fees (if you're into saving money and who isn't really?).

All tickets can be purchased at the registers (while supplies last) for a $2 service fee. We take cash and credit cards for all ticket sales.

Please note that on the day of the show, we will stop selling tickets for that show at 5pm.

If you have a question about whether we've sold out of a specific show, please call the store at 323-245-6400.

 

JUST ADDED SHOWS:

Jeff Bridges El Rey

Jeff Bridges
El Rey Theatre
April 25

eric andre fonda

The Eric Andre Show
The Fonda Theatre
June 12

 

Here is a full list of tickets we currently have for sale at Amoeba Hollywood:

Show Name Venue Show Date Ticket Price
(fee not included)
Bat for Lashes The Fonda Theatre 04/23/2013 $30.00
Bonobo El Rey Theatre 05/05/2013 $25.00
Billy Bragg El Rey Theatre 03/28/2013 $32.00
Jeff Bridges El Rey Theatre 04/25/2013 $45.00
Capital Cities El Rey Theatre 06/06/2013 $18.00
Cloud Cult El Rey Theatre 05/11/2013 $17.00
Daedelus The Fonda Theatre 03/29/2013 $17.50
Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. El Rey Theatre 05/16/2013 $20.00
The Eric Andre Show The Fonda Theatre 06/12/2013 $20.00
Ghostface Killah (18+ show)
(SOLD OUT at Amoeba, tix may
be available at Mayan Box Office)
The Mayan 03/28/2013 $20.00
Andy Grammar The Fonda Theatre 05/17/2013 $25.00
IAMX The Fonda Theatre 05/15/2013 $25.00
Killing Joke The Fonda Theatre 05/05/2013 $27.50
Kip Moore El Rey Theatre 04/09/2013 $25.00
Lights El Rey Theatre 050/2/2013 $30.00
Living Colour El Rey Theatre 03/30/2013 $30.00
Los Amigos Invisibles The Fonda Theatre 04/26/2013 $22.50
Mavericks El Rey Theatre 03/26/2013 $30.00
Peter Murphy The Fonda Theatre 07/27/2013 $27.50
Netsky The Fonda Theatre 04/05/2013 $28.50
OMD The Fonda Theatre 04/15/2013 $35.00
Shuggie Otis El Rey Theatre 04/27/2013 $32.00
Amoeba Presents Shlohmo The Fonda Theatre 04/06/2013 $20.00
Soul Slam IX with DJ Spinna (21+ show) Arena Nightclub 05/03/2013 $14.00
Lindsey Sterling The Fonda Theatre 04/04/2013 $22.50
Texas Is the Reason The Fonda Theatre 03/30/2013 $19.99
Turbonegro El Rey Theatre 05/25/2013 $25.00
Watsky/Cardboard Castles Tour El Rey Theatre 05/04/2013 $17.00
Youth Lagoon El Rey Theatre 04/17/2013 $20.00

 

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