Amoeblog

California Fool's Gold -- Exploring the City of Walnut

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 20, 2009 04:40pm | Post a Comment

This Los Angeles County community blog is about the City of Walnut, a wealthy, woodsy Los Angeles suburb located in the southeastern portion of the San Gabriel Valley.

 

Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Maps of the San Gabriel Valley and Walnut

To vote for other LA County communities, vote here. To vote for Los Angeles neighborhoods, vote here. To vote for Orange County neighborhoods, vote here.


William R. Rowland Adobe Redwood Ranch House
Before it took on its current Asian persuasion, Walnut was mostly Caucasian. Before that, of course, it was inhabited by the Tongva people, whose village in the area was called Pemookangna. After the Spaniards arrived it was mostly used as a ranch which grew walnuts, wheat, grapes, fruit trees and as pasture for cattle. By the 1840s, the Spaniards called the area Rancho de Nogales, which means Walnut Ranch. Many of those walnuts were pickled. In 1868, John Rowland and William Workman divided the land into La Puente to the west and Walnut to the east. The city was incorporated in 1959. In 1975, the William R. Rowland Adobe Redwood Ranch House was designated an Historical Landmark. 



A few years back, a number of well-heeled Taiwanese business people moved to Walnut. Ten years ago, Asians, non-Latino whites and Latinos still made up roughly equal populations of the city and CNN hailed Walnut as a model of diversity. Since then, large numbers of Cantonese, mainland Chinese and especially Filipinos have moved to the area and numbers of white and Latino residents have diminished. The city’s changing character is reflected in the variety of popular restaurants including Heartland's Market and Kitchen, Apo Apo Deli Café, UCC Cafe, Colima Burgers, Coffee Break, Sate House, El Taco Nazo, Ninja Sushi, Mikasa, Kalahi Bakery, the New York Pizzeria, Osuna's, Bangkok BBQ, Charlie's Sandwhich Shoppe, Upper House Boba Tea Shop and Donut Tree. Donut Tree, open 24 hours a day, serves as a sort of de facto community center. When my roommate Tim and I went there, it was packed with retirees speculating about Oprah's reasons for announcing her retirement. The retirees came and went during our visit, all seeming to know one another, and almost invariably arriving and departing in nice cars.
Hockneyesque collage panorama of Walnut's downtown
Walnut is a decidedly tranquil, some would say, sleepy suburb. Money named it the 70th best place to live in 2009, thus placing it above all other California cities, although there doesn't seem to be a lot to do. Its "downtown" is a cluster of shopping centers known as "The Village" and is dominated by chains like Applebee's, Panda Express, Kohl's, Staple's, Starbucks and Millie's, albeit quaintly rendered in a craftsman style. As with many suburbs, most of the businesses are spread out along the main thoroughfares, clustered in shopping centers with names like Flag Automotive Center, Lemon Creek Village and Walnut Tech Business Center. As we know from films like Poltergeist, Blue Velvet and Paranormal Activity, sleepy towns usually have their share of ghosts, and Walnut is no exception according to this website.

Wildin' out at the Walnut Family Festival

In the autumn, Walnut hosts a parade and fair held in Suzanne Park which is known as the Walnut Family Festival


                                      Wolfgang Delgado                                                                Darius McCrary

There aren't that many famous Walnut natives. Former Amoebite Wolfgang Delgado used to live there, as did Darius McCrary (Family Matters' Eddie Winslow). The self-described Latin Elvis and Latin Frank Sinatra, Gerardo "la Pelota" Meija, moved there from Ecuador and became the world's first Latino Rap Superstar with his megahit, "Rico Suave." It’s also the birthplace of drummer Ricky Lawson.
A few films have been shot in Walnut, in part or in whole, including Awaken the Dead, Background(ed), Freudian Eyebrow, Hangman, The Call, Zodiac and Lakeview Terrace

California Fool's Gold -- A Southeast Los Angeles Primer

Posted by Eric Brightwell, April 28, 2009 06:52pm | Post a Comment
SELACO - THE SOUL OF SUBURBAN SPRAWL


Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Map of Southeast Los Angeles County


Introduction to Southeast Los Angeles County

One of my favorite aspects of the Southland is that there is no single, dominant center. Whereas many bemoan the region’s sprawl, I prefer to think of it as a vast, occasionally smoggy theme park, with scattered neighborhoods and cities all exhibiting their own charms just like the rides at “the happiest place on Earth.” But instead of Critter Country, Mickey's Toontown or Tomorrowland, we have the IE (Inland Empire), the Valley (the San Fernando Valley), the Eastside, the Westside, South LA, the Pomona Valley, The Harbor, the San Gabriel Valley, the South Bay, the Santa Monica Mountains, Angeles Forest, the Channel Islands, Northeast LA (NELA), the Antelope Valley, Northwest County, the Verdugos, Downtown, Midtown, the Mideast Side, &c.

Outside of Los Angeles County there's the Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario Metropolitan Area, the Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura Metro Area, more Channel Islands, and Orange County, each with their own regions. But there is one scarcely-discussed region of Los Angeles County that, as far as I know, lacks a name despite its unique character, like that part of Fantasyland around Mr. Toad's Wild Ride. I speak of the communities of southeast Los Angeles County. OK, whilst hardly the epicenter of, well, much of note in the Southland, it’s in no way the complete, cultural no man’s land that its near absolute lack of exposure or press suggests and I hope to suggest that there are actual points of interest or at least note in the area.

Imperfect existing terms

The cities and neighborhoods north of the Harbor area, east of South Los Angeles, west of OC and south of East LA and the SGV are, in the official usage of the Los Country Board of Supervisors, referred to with the unwieldy and colorless moniker “Southeast Los Angeles County.” There are several names that actually apply to the area, but all are problematic for the same reasons -- they don’t correspond either entirely or solely to the area in question. The 562 area code covers much of the area but also parts of Long Beach, Orange County and South Los Angeles, The Gateway Cities is an even larger area, including not only the 562 area but also parts of East Los Angeles, the San Gabriel Valley and the South Bay. Given the historical importance of dairy farming in the area, Paramount, Bellflower, Cerritos, La Palma and Cypress were often collectively referred to as the Dairy Cities or Dairyland, but Cypress and La Palma are in Orange County, so that's out.

Support for Selaco

In order to promote pride and awareness of the area, I coined the term Selaco, roughly an acronym for SouthEast Los Angeles COunty. My thinking was that it would catch on in the way Benelux, WeHo and NoHo have, yet WeCo (for West Covina) sadly hasn’t, regardless of how often I say it. A little research proved, to my surprise, that (as with almost all my attempted neologisms) I was beaten to the punch and there was a small but real precedent for the term "Selaco" or variations already. For example there is SLACYD (Southeast Los Angeles Country Young Democrats), ARCSELAC (The Association for Retarded Citizens of Southeast Los Angeles County), SELACO WIB (The Southeast Los Angeles County Workforce Investment Board) and, most encouragingly, a school in the Selaco city of Downey called Selaco-Downey High. If saying “Selaco” makes you cringe, just keep repeating it until you’re numb. If Selaco had been in use a couple of years ago, the outwardly generic, ultimate suburb with the seedy underbelly would've probably become the title to David Lynch's last film instead of the misleading Inland Empire.


The character of Selaco

The area that makes up Selaco, like almost all of the Southland, passed from the hands of the Tongva, to the Spanish, then the Mexicans, and finally the US. Once part of the US, the area was largely inundated with Dutch and Portuguese dairy farmers. With the expansion of trains and the discovery of oil, many more people moved to the area. During World War II, much of the area became the site of heavy industry and Selaco, along with South Los Angeles, made up the industrial core of the Southland. During and following World War II, areas of Selaco also became heavily suburban and populated by returning GIs and their families. When industry began to relocate, jobs began to disappear and crime rose. In the face of vacating industry and suburban decay, many of the mainly middle class black and white residents moved away to newer suburbs in other parts of the county. A large majority of the new inhabitants were recent immigrants from Mexico. In spite of any apparent heterogeneity, Selaco is in fact fairly diverse. In fact, the so-called ABC region (Artesia-Bellflower-Cerritos) is ethnically and linguistically among the most diverse regions in the country. Being a vast flood plain, it tends to be quite flat geologically, but also architecturally. There are a few taller structures however, probably the tallest being the 10-story Bank of the West in Commerce.
 
 

Artesia

Artesia is named after the area’s many artesian wells, which I vaguely remember learning about in my Rocks for Jocks (Geology 101) class. As it suburbanized, most of the dairy farmers moved to Chino or the Central Valley. The stretch of Pioneer Blvd between 183rd and South is known to most people as Little India. There is a huge number of clothing stores, various varieties of Indian restaurants and lots of beauty salons. Pretty much any night (besides Mondays) the sidewalks are bustling with a mostly south Asian crowd. However, Indians only make up a small percentage of greater Artesia and around Little India there are a large number of Korean-owned businesses. Because there are also large numbers of Azoreans, Chinese, Filipinos and Mexicans, the city compromised and the official name of the area is the unfortunately faceless but thankfully rarely-used "International and Cultural Shopping District."

 
 
Michelle Kwan, most famous as an ice-skater but also an occasional voice actor [Arthur (the cartoon, not the films about the lovable alcoholic), Mulan II and others], operates the East West Ice Palace in Artesia. In addition, the film Rising Shores was filmed in Little India... whoops, I mean the International Peoples' Commercial Consumer Zone of... whatever. Its most famous feature is the water tower atop an artesian well that was featured prominently in Freddy's Dead - The Final Nightmare.
 

Bell


Pioneer James George Bell moved from Missouri to the area, which he subsequently farmed, presided over as the first postmaster, and established himself as a noted Freemason, living in the Victorian, eponymous Bell House. In 1896, he graciously leant his name to the town he lived in. Bell (the town, not the man) didn’t see significant growth until the 1920s. In 1925, the Alcazar Theater opened. Not surprisingly, it later became known as the Bell Theater and subsequently, when James was safely gone, the Liberty Theater before it was demolished in the late 1980s. In the 1960s, 15-year-old George Escobedo of Huntington Park stabbed to death two 17-year-olds in the theater's restroom, Robert Haney of Cudahy and Billie Bogard of Bell Gardens. According to Escobedo, they and two other cornered him and his friend, telling them, “We don’t like surfers round here," at which point Escobedo jabbed them.
 
In other film-related news, AMPAS Executive Director Bruce Davis described Bell as a “Bermuda Triangle for Oscar things” after, in 2000, 55 Oscars were stolen from a City of Bell loading dock... following 4,000 Oscar ballots being misrouted and showing up at Post Office processing center in Bell.

 

  1989’s Intruder and the 2008 short Cure were filmed in Bell.

 
Bell Gardens

In keeping with standard Los Angeles County nicknaming practices, Bell Gardens is frequently referred to as “Bell Garbage" (get it?), although I would prefer "Smell Gardens," but that doesn't seem destined to be. Bell Gardens is also named after James Bell. The “gardens” of its name derives from the many Japanese who, early in Bell Gardens’ existence established vegetable gardens and rice fields in the fertile soil. Beginning in the 1930s, cheap homes were constructed, filled largely by defense plant workers. Bell Gardens is also home to the oldest home in Los Angeles County (Casa de Rancho San Antonio or the Henry Gage Mansion), begun in 1795 by Francisco Salvador Lugo and his son, Antonio María Lugo.
 
 

Bellflower

Unlike other Selaco towns with “bell” in the name, Bellflower most likely derives its name from a mispronunciation of Belle Fleur, a type of apple grown by local pioneer William Gregory. How it became the name of the town is something of a mystery, although it was reportedly foisted upon the unknowing townsfolk by a group of so-called “leading citizens.” It originally experienced a jolt of growth when the famed Red Cars made a stop there and the population grew from about 100 to 1200 in just a few years, with Somerset Avenue becoming the center of excitement in town. Before that, its citizens took joy in being “The home of 200,000 laying hens.” By the 1950s and ‘60s, Bellflower Boulevard was a happening thoroughfare popular with those wanting to cruise and Clark Street was known for its shopping. In large part rejecting malls and chains, Bellflower chose to promote mom-and-pop stores and its small-town vibe. Nicknaming itself “The Friendly City,” many of the residents nonetheless moved away to the more modern suburbs of the SFV, SGV and OC. By the ‘90s, Bellflower was nearly bankrupt. Most recently, the media has returned to “The Friendly City” to follow the adventures of Octomom.


The school scenes of The Invisible Kid, and the short films Picket Guy and Until Next Time were filmed in Bellflower.

 
 

Cerritos

With its connotations of polluted air, deafening noise, gridlock and road rage, it’s hard to imagine a city crowing over its bounty of interstates and congested roadways. Cerritos (aka “The Freeway City”) presumably chose that appellation back when people thought that cigarettes were good for one’s T-zone or that carpets were a good idea. Cerritos, formerly Dairy Valley, became Cerritos in 1967. For the first two years of the ‘70s, it held the distinction of being the fastest growing city in the state. In keeping with the town's tradition of curious priorities, today citizens of Cerritos boast the New Orleans-style architecture of the Cerritos Auto Square (the world’s largest auto mall), the antiquatedly-spelled “Ceritos Towne Center” (built in ’94) and a big mall built in 1971, Los Cerritos Center. In the 1980s, Cerritos became a favored destination for Filipino immigrants, as well as many Chinese and Koreans. In 1986, an air collision above the city killed 82 and the Cerritos Sculpture Garden was created to commemorate the disaster. Public transportation in the city is courtesy of the propane-fuelled Cerritos On Wheels (COW). The four-acre Pat Nixon Park occupies the site of the former First Lady's childhood home and truck farm, where she lived from 1914 until 1931.

 

The city has many ties to the entertainment industry. The Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts opened in 1993 with “Old Blue Eyes” singing four consecutive dates. Cerritos is also the birthplace of Morris Chesnut and the hometown of Roger Lodge. Until Tomorrow Comes, Coneheads, She's All That and Eli's Liquor Store were all mostly or entirely filmed there, as was Thunder’s “Boys Like Girls” music video and the short film The First Time.

Commerce

Straight out of Commerce. In the northwest corner of Selaco, with East LA to the north and South Central to the west, the city of Commerce is often called “City of Commerce" and it is indeed where it takes place, if the "it" in question is... commerce. In 1887, when the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway built its main line through the area, the area quickly became industrialized. In the late 1940s, industrial figures, along with residents of Bandini, Rosewood and Bell Gardens, gave the city its name to encourage commerce. It became a city in 1960 to avoid annexation by Los Angeles or Vernon. Whereas many of the Gateway Cities suffered heavily during the deindustrialization of the next two decades, Commerce remains oriented around manufacture and retail.



The aforementioned outlet mall is the city's recognizable feature. It was built in 1929 to resemble the palace of Assyrian ruler Šarru-kên II (Sargon II) as the new home for Adolph Schleicher's Samson Tire & Rubber Company. Given Hollywood's vague notions about accuracy, it was featured in Ben-Hur.
To the south is the rather less impressive, castle-like Shoe City. The various duchies of Commerce are currently ruled by the court of current Miss Commerce, Leilani Davis. 1975's made-for-TV youth/crime Susan Dey vehicle Cage Without a Key was also filmed there.

California Fool's Gold -- Exploring San Marino

Posted by Eric Brightwell, April 29, 2008 03:00pm | Post a Comment
This entry in a series about Los Angeles County communities is about San Marino. To vote for more communities, click here. To vote for Los Angeles neighborhoods, click here. To vote for Orange County neighborhoods, vote here.

San Marino is located in the San Gabriel Valley and is neighbored by Pasadena and San Pasqual to the north, East Pasadena and East San Gabriel to the east, Alhambra and San Gabriel to the south, and South Pasadena to the east.

 
                             Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Maps of San Marino

San Marino (aka Chan Marino - thanks to Ngoc for that tidbit) is a tiny, affluent city nestled in the San Gabriel Valley which comes in at number 48 on the list of America's least-affordable places to live.  Its homes were mostly built in the second quarter of the 20th century and are in a fairly wide variety of styles-- some are actually pretty low key. Monterey Park may've been envisioned as the "Beverly Hills of East L.A." by its planners, but surely San Marino has more right to the comparison than other Easterly cities and neighborhoods. It has often, on TV and film, subbed as the West Side, East Coast or just a nice, anonymous neighborhood in such timeless, Hollywood classics as Mr & Mrs. Smith,  Monster-In-Law,  One Hour Photo, American Wedding, Men In Black II,  and television episodes of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, the Office, The West Wing and Alias. Despite the fact that in films and TV it is used to portray genteel, white neighborhoods, in reality most of the population is Chinese-American, which is why people jokingly refer to it as Chan Marino. The population is currently 47% Asian (mostly Taiwanese and Chinese), 44% white (mostly English) and 5% Latino.

Continue reading...

California Fool's Gold -- Exploring Alhambra, the Gateway to the San Gabriel Valley

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 5, 2007 05:00pm | Post a Comment

I had to go to
Alhambra to see a man about a horse at the bidding of the original San Gabriel Valley Girl, the always radiant Ngoc Nguyen. To vote for another Los Angeles neighborhood, vote here. To vote for a Los Angeles County Community, vote here. To vote for more Orange County communites, click here


Pendersleigh & SonsOfficial Map of the San Gabriel Valley


ALHAMBRA'S LOCATION

Alhambra is on the western edge of the San Gabriel Valley between posh
San Marino, trendy South Pasadena, old San Gabriel, blue collar Rosemead, and the most Chinese city in the US, Monterey Park.


Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Map of Alhambra

The center of Alhambra is the intersection of Garfield and Main, which has functioned as the hub of town at least since 1895.


                          Garfield and Main, 1890                            Garfield and Main, 2007 improved with an Applebees


My favorite historical site, however, isn't really too historical. There's a great shopping center, New Valley Shopping Center, built in 1964. Its main anchor is replaced the 168 Market -- a subsidiary of Ranch 99 Market. It's one of those many, amazing LA simulacra that make what would normally be a boring stripp mall feel like a visit to Disneyland. This shopping center is, much more successfully than the Cerritos Auto Mile, going for a New Orleans French Quarter vibe with a gazebo, faux wrought-iron street lamps and balconies, and a cupola with a liberty bell. And in this beautiful setting, things get pretty third world, just in the Big Easy. 


New Valley Shopping Center


ALHAMBRA DEMOGRAPHICS

By the 1950s, Garfield and Main was the hippest place in the San Gabriel Valley and was predominantly populated mostly by Italian-Americans. The following decade saw an influx of Latinos from surrounding areas and Anglos moving to other suburbs. In the late 1960s Alhambra was a hotbed of anti-Vietnam War protests and Brown Beret activity. By the mid 1970s tensions rose between the predominantly Anglo "surfers" and cholos. Many
Taiwanese began to move to the neighborhood, followed by Chinese from the mainland, Vietnamese, Cambodians and other Asians
. Today the population is roughly 47% Asian (mostly Chinese and Vietnamese), 36% Latino (Mostly Mexicans of any race), and 14% white.


ALHAMBRA EATS

The San Gabriel Valley is widely recognized for having the best collection of restaurants in Los Angeles County. Being the gateway to the SGV, entering Alhambra on bike I was always hit with a blast of delicious fragrances emanating from kitchens and restaurants. Even though they make up a very small percentage of Los Angeles's Asian-American population, Los Angeles being the great city of the
Pacific Rim it should be no surprise that the highest population of Indonesians is in Los Angeles County. The highest concentration within Los Angeles County is in Alhambra. I mention this first because Indonesian cuisine is one of the world's greatest and Alhambra boasts a few places to get it. Borneo Kalimantan CuisineIndo Kitchen, and Wong Java House. One can also get Indonesian and/or Indonesian-inspired dishes at Garden Café, Savoy Kitchen, and maybe Noodle World. That being said, there's no place in Alhambra that I've eaten more than Yazmin Malaysian Restaurant -- representing the cuisine of Indonesia's neighbor to the north -- Malaysia, of course. I'm also a fan of Banh Mi Che Cali, the Alhambra Lee’s Sandwiches (don’t hate!), Thai Purple, and at least the fried zucchini at Rick’s

In addition to the aforementioned cuisines and restaurants, Alhambra boasts a number of American, Cajun, Chinese, Dim Sum, Hawaiian, Hu, Indian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mexican, Taiwanese, Thai, Vietnamese restaurants including the following:

California Fool's Gold -- Exploring Montebello

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 3, 2007 11:10am | Post a Comment

Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Map of Montebello

I went to a baptism the other day for one Mateo Gareza in the city of Montebello, the subject of this neighborhood blog. To vote for another Los Angeles neighborhood, vote here. To vote for a Los Angeles County Community, vote here. To vote for Orange County neighborhoods, vote here.

 
Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Maps of Southeast Los Angeles County

For the occasion I was oaccompanied by none other than Miss San Gabriel Valley 05, 06 and '07, Ngoc Nguyen. Montebello, for those not in the know, is situated between the more interesting East Los Angeles, Monterey Park and Rosemead. It straddles the San Gabriel Valley and SELACO. They used to have a Puerto Rican parade, the only one west of Chicago, but it was deemed too much fun and moved to the Pomona Fairgrounds. It still has a lot of Mexican restaurants, chain stores and bakeries.


Mateo wore a white Ralph Lauren with popped collar and white trousers. Several other boys wore similar outfits, although some sported white dress shirts and vests and the girls all dressed like child brides.
 

  
                       Young Master Gareza                                    Glamorous Montebello Town Center Mall


THE BAPTISM

If you've never been to a Catholic ceremony, you probably wrongly assume (as I used to), that there's scary hushed chanting in Latin, ominous hooded figures, incense and peppermints and statues of Jesus crying real blood.

But sadly, no. There's merely unenthusiastic and unintelligible mumbling, scary sweater-clad figures, acoustic guitars and churchgoers crying real tears of boredom. Catholicism is now like an exaggerated stereotype of the blandest version of Protestantism.

On two separate occasions I went into some weird zone where I could count every speck of dust illuminated by colorful shafts of light passing through stain glass windows and then everyone would stand up (except for the guy that fell asleep) at the prescribed time and I'd come back to the "real" world. You're told to stand. You only stand when you're told to. The spirit will not move you to say "Amen;" rather, the priest will make a gesture. This is the organization that burned people at the stake just for kicks so I did what was expected and tried not to doze off.

As with every Catholic service I've attended, at the final "Amen" there is a spirited dash for the parking lot that rivals the final bell ringing in public school. No donuts and chit chat for this set. It's off to grill outs or bars -- both safely removed from the stifle of the Church.

MONTEBELLO DEMOGRAPHICS & CHARACTER

Today Montebello is roughly 75% Latino (mostly Mexican and Salvadoran), 11% Asian (mostly Japanese) and 11% White (mostly Armenian).  Montebello is home to the oldest Armenian community in Los Angeles County and home to the only Armenian Cathedral in California, Holy Cross Armenian Apostolic CathedralThe Armenian Martyrs Monument at Bicknell Park commemorating the victims of the Armenian Genocide by the Ottoman Turks is the largest monument found on public property in the World. In the early 20th century, Japanese Montebellans ran  four nurseries in town, but were sent to concentration camps during WW II. Japanese-Peruvian and Japanese-Hawaiian communities settled in Montebello after the Japanese interment ended.


MONTEBELLO HISTORY

As with most of the area, the region now part of Montebello was for thousands of years Tongva land. After the Spaniards arrived, most of the Tongva died out with almost none left by 1870. During Spanish and subsequently Mexican rule, most of the lands which now compose the city of were parts of Rancho San Antonio, Rancho La Merced and Rancho Paso de Bartolo
The Juan Matias Sanchez Adobe, built in 1844, remains standing at the center of old Rancho La Merced in eastern Montebello and is the city's oldest structure. The Battle of Rio San Gabriel took place in Montebello on January 8, 1847. After several decades as part of Mexico it became part of the US.

In the 1860s, some 5,000 acres  of the East Los Angeles region was owned by an Italian settler from Genoa, Alessandro Repetto. After his death in 1885, his brother sold his rancho to a consortium of five Los Angeles businessmen. It was out of the Harris Newmark and Kaspare Cohn share that Montebello was established in 1899. After consulting William Mulholland, it was incorporated as the Montebello Land and Water Company in 1900.
 
An area of 200 acres adjacent to the tracks of the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad  were developed into a townsite called Newmark, and the remainder of the land was subdivided into small lots. Newmark became Montebello. Montebello was originally an agricultural community. From its beginnings through the 1920s, the area was famed for its production of flowers, vegetables, berries, and fruits. On October 19th, 1920, the city's name was officially changed to Montebello and it was incorporated.
The discovery of oil by Standard Oil Company on the Anita Baldwin and Walter P. Temple properties in the Montebello hills, in 1917, resulted in a switch from agriculture to oil production. 

MONTEBELLO EATS

The annual Armenian Food Fair is hosted in May every year at Holy Cross Cathedral. As far as restaurants, there's Alberto's Mexican FoodAlexandras, Aloha Hawaiian BBQAlondra Hot WingsAmy's Pastry, Ani's ChickenArry's Super Burger, Astro Burgers, El Atacor No 7, Bakers Square Restaurant & PiesBamboo ExpressBeverly Pizza & Subs, Big SubmarineBJ's Suds & Grubs PizzeriaBrioche PastriesBroaster Kitchen, Bryan's Super Burgers, El BukanasCalifornia Chicken RoasterCalifornia Steak & Fries, Canton City Restaurant, Chela's Tacos, Chicken NowChinese Food ExpressChinese Garden, Crabby's Seafood and MoreThe Daily Brew Coffee House, Doublz, Fiesta MexicanaFruit RevolutionGardunosGina's Pizzeria, Golden Skewer, Golden Ox BurgersGolden Wok, Great WrapsHappy Family Restaurant, Happy Teriyaki Bowl, House of KabobHye BakeryJ&S, JP's Pizzeria, Jimmie's Family RestaurantJin Ja TeriyakiJuan Great FiestaKrazy KabobsKuan's Chinese, LebizuMaki Yaki, Massis KabobMediterranean Express GrillMiki Chan's Okazu Ya, Modern Thai, NeveraNick Paradise CafeOrdonez Mexican Restuarant, Panderia y PastaleriaEl PatioPiccolo MondoLa Pinata Tortilleria, Los PinosPlaya Baja Mexican SeafoodPlaya Baja No 2, Playa Express, Polly's Pies, Rafael's Mexican RestaurantRio's Pizza, Salvatore Italian Restaurant & PizzaSergio's Tacos, La SirenitaSubmarina, Sushi Bar Cafe Hiraki, Sweet O DonutsTaco VillageTacos Don Chente, Tam's BurgersTapia Mexican Food, Tokyo GrillTom's Burgers,Tony's Italian Delicatessen, Tutti Frutti Frozen YogurtTwo Sal's Pizza, Venecia Bakery, Waba GrillWhittier Peruvian Restaurant, Wild Coyote Steakhouse, Zankou Chicken and El Zipote Pupuseria.

STUFF TO DO

A common criticism of Montebello is that there's not much to do. Not exactly au contraire, but what about Beverly Bowl? Club Chico? Little Red Rooster?, The Paloma Room? Quiet Cannon?

MONTEBELLO IN MUSIC



Not a lot of big musicians from Montebello. Jack Russell, lead singer from Great White, is from there. Then there's a rapper who goes by Nosaj Thing. Pioneering Chicano band The Blendells were also from Montebello. It also produced the punk band, Anti-SocialMontebello was mentioned in Little Village's song "The Action."
MONTEBELLO IN FILM

Several actors from Montebello have gone onto receive a degree of recognition. Montebello-born and not-even-remotely-Kazakh-looking actor Jay Hernandez appeared in the Kazakh film Nomad.


*****


Follow me at ericbrightwell.com
BACK  <<  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  >>  NEXT