Amoeblog

Amoebapalooza SF at Milk Bar, February 17

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, February 9, 2019 06:50pm | Post a Comment



Amoebapalooza SF is back with more Amoebite-powered musical mayhem on Sunday, February 17th. We’re keeping things very local and throwing this shindig directly across the street at Milk Bar (1840 Haight St.). Doors open to the public at 7pm and the show starts at 8pm. Admission is just $5. This is a 21+ event.

This annual celebration of the talented Amoeba employees and FOBs (Friends of Amoeba) is always a hoot and this year's line-up is action-packed. From a provacative live reading by author Jon Longhi to a screening of filmmaker Steven Anguiano's short film to raucous live sets from Use Kleenex (Kleenex coverband), Top Fo'ties (AKA Jesus Dude Mom), novelty rock giants Alan's Cousin, Combo (Michael Cruz and Keith Frerichs), Eli & Adam Play Folk Music, and a mysterious project called I Have Crabs, this is shaping up to be one of the most legendary nights yet.

Thank you to our pals over at SIR for providing our musical back line!

Band spotlight: Alan's Cousin
Imagine Flight Of The Conchords and Tenacious D have a baby, and meanwhile, James Taylor and Alan's CousinSugar Ray have a baby. Those two babies get it on and have baby, but they realize, "Hold up, we were born a few days ago, we simply cannot raise a child." Said baby is given up for adoption and raised by Bob Dylan and The Beatles. That baby is Alan's Cousin.

Continue reading...

Having A Movie Moment with Jon Longhi: The Genius of Dan Curtis

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 15, 2019 07:00pm | Post a Comment

By Jon Longhi

Welcome to this month’s Having A Movie Moment With Jon Longhi, where I review recent Blu-ray Trilogy of Terrorreleases. This month I review three movies created by the brilliant Dan Curtis.

Dan Curtis was one of the most successful director/producers in the history of television. History will always remember him as the creator of the long running TV show Dark Shadows but that was just one of many major achievements. He also produced and/or directed some of the biggest movies in the history of television. Three of these films just got deluxe Blu-ray releases. One of his two biggest films was Trilogy Of Terror, (Kino Lorber Studio Classics). This is a fun little horror flick but no one could have predicted that it would be one of the most watched TV movies of all time. It held the record until Roots was televised later that decade. The movie tells three horror stories that are connected by the main star of the film, the magnificent Karen Black. She pretty much makes this movie. She is the main character in all three vignettes and chews up the scenery so mightily that everyone else in the picture is little more than a bit player. In the first segment she plays a mousy professor exploited by a blackmailer, in the second she's a pair of polar opposite sisters, but it's her role in the third segment, "Amelia," that history will remember her for. "Amelia" is one of the best little horror movies ever made and it scared the viewing public to a degree that few could understand in this jaded day and age. Karen Black's portrayal of the vulnerable, psychologically fragile Amelia makes the horror she suffers even more visceral. The story is fairly simple and all takes place in one tiny apartment. Amelia finds a Zuni fetish doll in a second hand store and buys it as a gift for her anthropologist boyfriend. The doll comes with a curse and, when she gets back to her apartment, Amelia unwittingly brings it to life. What ensues is one of the scariest things I've ever seen on television. This segment really holds up even after all these years. It's tense, harrowing, and genuinely scary. Being attacked by a doll could easily have been laughable, but in Curtis's skilled hands the story becomes utterly terrifying. This was one of the most memorable movies of the seventies and it left an indelible mark on everyone who saw it.

Continue reading...

Jon Longhi's Best of 2018

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 18, 2018 04:07pm | Post a Comment

Brian EnoBy Jon Longhi

Brian EnoMusic For Installations (CD & LP Box Set):
One of the things I've always loved about Brian Eno is that he seems to have an almost limitless output of new music. His body of work is gigantic. I've been buying his cds for decades and it's nice to know that he'll always come up with something new to charm, beguile, or soothe me. His ambient pieces tend to be my favorite ones. In these works, he tries to create a kind of music that sounds like it is going on forever and you are just hearing a tiny excerpt of it. In the book that accompanies this new box set, Eno reveals that he has been obsessed with creating music that doesn't just sound like it goes on forever but actually DOES go on forever. To aid him in this quest, he created what he refers to as "generative systems." These are either tape loops or computer programs that take simple harmonious tones and fragments of melody, and then randomly recombines them in patterns of music that will not repeat themselves for sometimes years or even decades. He even developed a computer program called 77 Million Paintings that creates an endless output of ambient music that NEVER repeats itself and is a truly infinite piece of music. This box set is a retrospective of some of the best of these sonic experiments. The title Music For Installations is quite literal because most of these works were composed to accompany art installations and Eno went to great lengths to make sure that every person who visited the art exhibits heard a different and unique piece of music. Some of these art installations were open for six months but had soundtracks that could play for over two centuries! This is a transcendentally beautiful set of music and it goes on for hours and hours. Like the best ambient music, it can either be in the background or the foreground of your life. The soothing sonic textures are guaranteed to heal your soul and move your troubled mind to tranquil peaceful places. The set is a little expensive, but since you get six CDs and roughly as many hours of music, you're only paying about ten bucks per CD/hour, which in the long run is a real bargain.

Continue reading...

Having A Movie Moment With Jon Longhi: The Horrors! The Horrors!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 29, 2018 06:07pm | Post a Comment

By Jon Longhi

Welcome to this month’s Having A Movie Moment With Jon Longhi, where I review recent Blu-ray releases. Both of these Blu-rays came out in the past three months. This month, I review two very different movies that just happen to have the word Horror in their titles.

Horrors of Malformed Men, Arrow Video:
This movie is like going to a Cirque Du Soleil show where all the performers on stage accidentally ate theHorrors of Malformed Men brown acid. I own a huge collection of cult films and along with the films of John Waters, Salvador Dali's Un Chien Andalou, Fellini's Satyricon, and Alejandro Jodorowsky's The Holy Mountain, and this movie pretty much rules the roost of the "HOLY SHIT, WHAT THE FUCK AM I WATCHING?" segment of my collection. The second half of this movie is like a sustained psychedelic assault on the senses. Director Teruo Ishii really pulled out all the stops to make this a one-of-a-kind experience. The movie is an adaptation of the writings of Edogawa Rampo and combines elements of his novels Strange Tale of Panorama Island and The Demon of The Lonely Isle with some of his short stories. The end result is a literal bombardment of strange surreal perversions. There's incest, bestiality, cannibalism, and a number of sexual fetishes that seem unique to Japan. There's a scene where a man sewn into a couch molests women who unsuspectingly sit on it.

Continue reading...

Having A Movie Moment With Jon Longhi: Halloween Roundup, Part 2

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 29, 2018 01:55pm | Post a Comment

By Jon Longhi

Welcome to the second special Halloween themed Having A Movie Moment With Jon Longhi, where I review recent Blu-ray releases. Halloween is my favorite holiday of the year because that’s when we get a glut of new horror and sci-fi releases. This is my second column this month where I just try and catch up with all of them.

Laserblast, Full Moon Features:
This is kind of a crappy little sci-fi movie from the glory days of VHS that has been given a super deluxe Laserblastedition for it's first Blu-ray release. The film comes in a full-size reproduction of the original video packaging. Inside the huge VHS box you get a DVD/ Blu-ray combo pack of the remastered film and a tiny toy reproduction of one of the aliens from the movie. These are the kinds of goodies that drive hardcore fans crazy and I'm sure somewhere in the future when this goes out-of-print copies will go for big bucks on Amazon and Ebay. Like I said, this is a crappy little movie but there are those of us out there (like myself) who love this film because it was on television when we were growing up. After re-watching it recently, I came to the conclusion that the movie has a really great beginning and end but really drags in between. The film starts with a crazed monster madman shooting a laser gun in the Southern California desert. He is killed by two aliens who soon depart but leave the gun behind. Shortly afterwards, a young man named Billy Duncan discovers the laser gun and that's when things start to go bad for him. At first he is overjoyed by the destructive power of the weapon but it soon starts to take over his life and physically change him. His skin starts to turn green and his behavior becomes increasingly violent and psychopathic. His relationships with his supportive girlfriend and others are increasingly strained as he becomes an alien madman who eventually goes completely berserk and finally goes on a rampage with his new laser gun. That's when the aliens need to come back...

Continue reading...
<<  1  2  3  4  >>  NEXT