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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile

Posted by Amoebite, May 22, 2018 01:55pm | Post a Comment

Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile What's In My Bag?

What happens when indie rock singer/songwriters and collaborators Courtney Barnett and Kurt Vile go record shopping for each other? Well, halfway through our What's In My Bag? interview it became apparent that almost every record Vile picked for Barnett was sure to make her cry. "This is the best record. You listen to this in the morning and you will cry," Vile said pulling out Days Have Gone By - Volume 6 by the revered fingerstyle guitarist John Fahey. Another sad classic for Vile was Townes Van Zandt's Flying Shoes. "This is my favorite record by this iconic, sad artist. The title track will kill you." When we noticed Vile's melancholy theme, Barnett replied, "Good, I love it. I love crying." 

Courtney Barnett is an Australian singer-songwriter known for her deadpan, slacker style. After playing with garage/grunge band Rapid Transit and psych/country band Immigrant Union, Barnett founded the Lotta Sea Licelabel Milk! Records and released her first solo EP, I've Got a Friend Called Emily Ferris, in 2012. Her next EP, 2013's How to Carve a Rose into a Carrot, won praise around the world. That year she performed at CMJ and played a several European dates, eventually releasing both EPs together as The Double EP: A Sea of Split Peas. She released her debut full-length, Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit. Her second LP, Tell Me How You Really Feel was released in May 2018.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Wooden Wand

Posted by Amoebite, December 27, 2017 03:14pm | Post a Comment

Wooden Wand at Amoeba Hollywood

"I'll probably take some guff for this," predicted singer/songwriter Wooden Wand (aka James Toth) as he pulled out Windham Hill: The First Ten Years from his Amoeba shopping bag. He went on to explain how he gets into arguments with other guitarists about the mostly acoustic, instrumental music label, considered by many to be an early proponent of "new age" music. "I think William Ackerman and Alex de Grassi made some incredible, incredible guitar records. In some ways every bit the equal - obviously very different - but every bit the equal of Robbie Basho and Fahey's early records." What was not up for debate was Toth's extensive music knowledge, as he went shopping for a wide range of genres, happily giving his personal take on each record in our latest What's In My Bag? episode.

Wooden Wand Clipper ShipFreak folk artist James Jackson Toth, better known as Wooden Wand or sometimes just WAND, first made his name as a member of the early and mid-'00s era New Weird America scene of psych, folk, and indie artists. Since then he has continued to evolve and experiment as an artist, dabbling in outlaw country, free jazz, acid folk, noise rock, and Americana-influenced rock 'n' roll. The prolific Toth has put out an eclectic mix of self-released singles, CD-Rs, cassettes, compilation albums and more traditional studio albums.

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Weekly Wednesday Steal: I Am The Resurrection: A Tribute To John Fahey

Posted by Billy Gil, October 8, 2014 07:40am | Post a Comment

This week's Weekly Wednesday Steal, is I Am The Resurrection: A Tribute To John Fahey for $10 on vinyl (regularly $26.98).

The album features contributions from artists like Sufjan Stevens, The Fruit Bats, Devendra Banhart, Lee Ranaldo, Calexico, M. Ward and more. The LP was a Black Friday release from last year.

John Fahey is the legendary self-trained guitarist whose primitivist and avant-garde style would help inspire a generation of musicians like Sonic Youth and Jim O'Rourke. Though he was little known for the majority of his career, he eventually came into prominence later in his career, being named in Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" list.

A new item is featured on Amoeba.com every Wednesday for $10, while supplies last. It's limited to one per customer, and the deal is only available on the website. As always, there’s free shipping on all music and movies you buy on Amoeba.com throughout the United States.

The Art of the LP Cover- Halloween Special Pt 3.

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, October 31, 2010 12:05am | Post a Comment

Happy Halloween!




Davey Graham 1940 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, December 16, 2008 05:51pm | Post a Comment

The legendary English guitarist and a major influence on practically every fingerstyle acoustic guitarist for the past 50 years, Davey Graham, passed away on Monday of lung cancer which was detected only a few weeks ago. He was 68.

Born November 22nd, 1940 in Hinckley, Leicestershire, England, he took up the guitar at the age of 12. By the age of 19 Graham composed what would probably be his most famous piece, “Anji,” released on his debut 1962 EP, 3/4 AD, and later covered by the likes of Pentangle and Simon & Garfunkel.

Here in the United States, Graham perhaps wasn’t as well known as some of his contemporaries but he has been credited with single-handedly inventing the concept of the folk guitar instrumental in the U.K.-- simultaneous honors in the U.S would go to John Fahey, who was making similar innovations. Graham influenced a who’s who of British guitarists from Bert Jansch, John Renbourn, Richard Thompson, John Martyn, Nick Drake, Martin Carthy, and Jimmy Page -- Page’s instrumental "White Summer" was heavily based on Graham's "She Moved Thru the Bazaar/Blue Raga."

In 1959 Graham first made headlines with his attention grabbing performance of “Cry Me a River’ in the BBC television documentary Hound Dogs and Bach Addicts: The Guitar Craze, produced by Ken Russell. During the 1960s he played a major role in the British folk revival, releasing a series of eclectic solo albums that touched on a wide range of music, from jazz and blues to Indian and Arabic and gypsy. He introduced to many an aspiring young guitarist the DADGAD guitar tuning, whose chief appeal is the ability to improvise freely, yet maintain a solid underlying rhythm and harmony. But Graham's career was somewhat unpredictable; his concerts were often hit or miss. Much of his reputation was based on a couple of brilliant albums, both released in the same week of 1965, Folk Routes, New Routes in a duet with the folk singer Shirley Collins and Folk, Blues and Beyond, a mostly instrumental album that combined all his world music styles. His live playing was best captured and recorded in 1967 on an incredible album entitled After Hours, which was recorded in a student's dorm room on the campus of Hull University in front of an audience of about eight people. Nonetheless, and in many ways, even as impulsive as he may have been, Davey Graham was the first guitar hero … and certainly one of mine.

There will be a private funeral held for Davey Graham later this week. A public memorial service is being planned for January.


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