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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Interpol

Posted by Amoebite, January 8, 2019 05:33pm | Post a Comment

Interpol - What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

We kicked off 2019 and our first What's In My Bag? episode of Season 12 with New York indie legends Interpol! The trio went shopping at Amoeba Hollywood recently and chatted with us about some of their favorite records and movies, including Peter Weir's Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World. Apparently the 19th century naval adventure/drama made such an impression on lead vocalist Paul Banks that he maybe, possibly got a tattoo inspired by the film. All three members had a lot of heartfelt and entertaining things to say about their eclectic picks, which ranged from Bad Brains to Roy Orbison and from Aphex Twin to Jesu.

The quintessential NYC indie band, Interpol consists of vocalist/guitarist Banks, guitarist/backing vocalist Daniel Kessler, and drummer Sam Fogarino. Initially formed in 1997, the group self-released Interpol - Marauder - Amoeba Musica series of EPs, and after a brief UK tour in 2001, performed on John Peel's BBC Radio program. Around this time, the band signed to Matador, who released their self-titled EP prior to the release of the critically-acclaimed, career-making 2002 full-length Turn on the Bright Lights. Interpol's sophomore LP, Antics, was released in 2004, reaching gold status on both the US and UK charts and earning them slots performing with the likes of U2 and The Cure. By 2007, the band had signed to major label Columbia for the release of their third LP, Our Love to Admire.

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Tribute To Legacy of Pioneering Influential Artist Pete Shelley [1955-2018] Co-Founder of Seminal 70’s UK Punk Band Buzzcocks

Posted by Billyjam, December 7, 2018 11:43am | Post a Comment

Sad news emerged yesterday that Buzzcocks lead singer/guitarist Pete Shelley had died from a suspected heart attack, as first reported on social media by his surviving younger brother Gary McNeish. Aged 63 the British artist born Peter Campbell McNeish, who enjoyed a career as both solo artist and co-founder of seminal UK punk band Buzzcocks, had been living in Estonia up until his passing on the morning of December 6th, 2018.

In 1975 while attending college Shelley and Howard Devoto co-founded the early era UK punk band Buzzcocks who made their influential debut performance opening for the Sex Pistols in Manchester in 1976. In January 1977 they released their debut record, the Spiral Scratch EP which, following the Sex Pistols, The Damned, and The Vibrators, was among the original wave of UK punk releases.

Not long after the release of Spiral Scratch in 1977 Howard Devoto left the band with Shelley then moving center stage as lead singer/songwriter and guitarist. As such he honed the band’s distinctive power-punk style.

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James Supercave Chat Before Amoeba LA & SF Performances

Posted by Billy Gil, February 9, 2016 03:33pm | Post a Comment

james supercaveAfter a few years of hype in the L.A. music scene, indie-pop band James Supercave are finally ready to drop their debut album, Better Strange. After breaking through onto local radio with the song "Burn" in 2014, the band (yes, it's a band, not a guy), which consists of frontman Joaquin Pastor, keyboardist Patrick Logothetti and guitarist Andres Villalobos, set about recording their debut. But perfection, particularly that of Pastor, meant that it took a couple of years, as the band told Noisey.

Now that it's finally here, Better Strange proves to be worth the wait. Songs like the title track roll along taut disco grooves and dreamy synth tones. Pastor’s highwire vocals can go from delicate to glammy in a heartbeat, calling to mind Marc Bolan and Jeff Buckley as his voice bounds through the hairpin turns of pounding indie-rocker “The Right Thing.” The band seemingly uses influences like LCD Soundsystem, Radiohead, The Shins and Brian Eno as a grab bag without taking too much from one place — at times the record is evocative, but it never lingers in one place. It's more focused on hooks than homage, and while the album is plenty catchy, its attention to detail is also immediately apparent and rewards on repeated listens.

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14 Indie Rock Records That Would Make a Great Gift

Posted by Billy Gil, December 15, 2014 12:11pm | Post a Comment

Gift Ideas Indie Rock

There have been tons of records released under the nebulous indie rock genre this year that find new things to say within the confines of rock 'n' roll (The War on Drugs), or throw out the rules while still remaining pleasing to listen to (Ariel Pink). Here are 14 widely appealing records from this year that would make a great gift for just about any indie rock fan. 

the war on drugs





 

The War on Drugs - Lost in the Dream

The War on Drugs’ dreamy country-rock music evokes slow motion, even as its songs move at a sprightly pace. The driving rhythm behind "Under the Pressure" is caked in heavily reverbed guitars and washes of synthesizer, even as real-life guitar solos and Adam Granduciel's vocals come through more clearly than ever before. Similarly "Red Eyes" is like some lost '80s collaboration between The Highwaymen and The Cure, effusing brilliant colors with its bright synths and yelping vocals, but the most stunning moment comes in the minute or so in the middle of the songs when a third of the sound is stripped away, leaving a gorgeous, introspective bridge before Granduciel's yelp brings everything crashing back, while the rhythm stays insistent as always. Lost in the Dream invites repeat listens—atmospheric pieces like "The Haunting Idle" keep things spacious, yet the band comes back for the Bruce Springsteen-vibing "Burning" in the albums latter half. As its title would suggest, it's an album to get lost in. It feels like seeing the entire open road ahead of you, coasting yet seemingly to move in place while the sun sets and middle-of-nowhere stations play Bruce and Tom Petty in the background.

The 50 Best Scottish Bands of All Time

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 16, 2014 03:12pm | Post a Comment
Scottish Flag


By now you and I have heard the arguments for and against Scottish independence from the UK but as someone who has naturally bristled like a thistle when diasporic people argue passionately and ill-informedly about another country's political situations (which they are thankfully powerless to effect) I'll keep my political opinions to myself. What I will do instead is far more frivolous purposes -- that is list the best Scottish bands of all time.


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Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's Map of Scotland

Given its small population, Scotland has produced a fairly shocking amount of great music. Sure, there have been occasional English bands of note -- almost always from the north -- but I've always taken Anglophiles' preference for all things (assumed to be) English over English language pop from anywhere else as proof of a terminal subcultural defect. It's not really fair to blame England for Anglophiles any more than it is to blame Nirvana for Puddle of Mudd but I suppose it's because so many of the helmet-haired horde mistakenly think that I am one of them that they so vex me. How could I not be an Anglophile when I drink more tea than the average North African, enjoy curry in all of its Asian forms, and my favorite writer is Irish

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