Amoeblog

New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with DJ/Producer Jamie Jones

Posted by Amoebite, April 16, 2019 02:09pm | Post a Comment

Jaime Jones - What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

Welsh DJ, producer, and Hot Creations label co-founder Jamie Jones did some shopping at Amoeba Hollywood recently for our latest What's In My Bag? episode. One of his current favorites is Negro Swan, the latest album by Blood Orange. Not only is he a huge Blood Orange fan in general, but Jones was especially fond of Georgia Anne Muldrow's guest appearance on the album. "I've heard a few of her songs before and I love what she does," he proclaimed. "I was going to buy this today and there was a vinyl copy which is even better."

Jamie Jones is known for his unique brand of warmer, more melody-driven techno. Named Resident Advisor's Top DJ of 2011, Jones first became a force in the scene through his mid-'00s DJs Can Dance warehouse parties in East London and summer gigs on Ibiza, including the Circoloco day parties at DC10. Inspired by Larry Levan’s Paradise Garage, Jones launched the now legendary Paradise series of parties. Born in Ibiza, Paradise regularly travels the globe. taking place in cities like NYC, Miami, LA, Toronto, and Moscow. 

Hot Creations labelAs a member of the British-American electronic group Hot Natured, Jones found mainstream recognition in the UK, after the group's single "Benediction" landed at #31 on the singles chart. A frequent honorary at the DJ Awards, Jones has been nominated multiple times for Best Tech House DJ, Breakthrough DJ, and Best International DJ. He has been awarded the crown of Best Deep House DJ several times. In addition to his performance career, Jones also heads the prolific Hot Creations label and its subsidiary labels, Emerald City and Hottrax.

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A Super Shangri-La Show Spectacular Halloween Double Feature, October 28

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 26, 2016 06:34pm | Post a Comment

William Castle, 13 Ghosts

-- By Brett Stillo

Halloween weekend is upon us, and what better way to start things off than with a cinematic ghost hunt in an old, haunted San Francisco theater.

The Super Shangri-La Show, hosted by the intrepid Kai Wada Roath, is more than a movie night atHouse your neighborhood theater. It is an exploration of the uncanny through the medium of cinema. Week after week, Roath takes his audience on a quest for myths, monsters, witchcraft, and lost civilizations inside a haunted movie theater -- the historic Balboa Theatre in the Outer Richmond. The Super Shangri-La Show is like a live-action version of the old Leonard Nimoy television program In Search Of, with Roath acting as a paranormal guide through a lost world of Drive-In and B-Movie monstrosities such as The Legend of Bogey Creek, The Devil’s Rain, Atlantis: The Lost Continent, and The Legend of Hell House, just to name a few.

Friday night’s double feature offers an ectoplasmic spectrum of haunted house stories. 13 Ghosts is a classic 1950’s spook show courtesy of legendary showman William Castle. Castle was notorious for the outrageously wacky gimmicks he built into his movies and 13 Ghosts is no exception. When the film was released in 1960, audience members were issued special filtered “ghost goggles” to view the cinematic poltergeists on the big screen thanks to a Castle-contrived process called “Illusion-O!”

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Amoeba's Top 10 Favorite Criterion Picks

Posted by Billy Gil, June 15, 2015 11:03am | Post a Comment

amoeba criterion top 10

Starting next week, we're holding a huge sale on Criterion Collection movies at Amoeba Hollywoodfrom June 18 through July 4, get 25% off all new Criterion DVDs and Blu-rays. You can read more about that sale here. To kick it off, we gathered our collective heads to pick our favorite Criterion movies on disc. Criteria varies, but generally these discs offer something special beyond the movie itself. Check out our picks below.

Band of Outsiders (1964)

band of outsiders criterion blu-rayJean-Luc Godard’s French New Wave classic gets a pristine high-definition digital transfer on both the DVD and Blu-ray, while excerpts from the documentary La nouvelle vague par elle-même offer behind-the-scenes footage and interviews with Godard. And a short film by the great French New Wave filmmaker Agnes Varda featuring much of the Band of Outsiders cast is just icing.

 

The Battle of Algiers ­(1966)

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One Album Wonders: Candyflip's Madstock... The Continuing Adventures of Bubblecar Fish

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 22, 2014 01:39pm | Post a Comment
Here is an additional edition of my series of great, mostly obscure, one album wonders. In the album era (roughly the mid-1960s until the mid-2000s), the album was the dominant format of recorded music expression and consumption. It seems that most musicians from that era, if able to scrape together the funds for the recording of one studio album, generally returned with at least one more.  Some, like Sun Ra, somehow released more albums than I've had hot dinners. Even most excellent bands, in my opinion, would have done well to find something other to do with their time rather than keep making records after their fifth album or twelfth year (although there is the Go-Betweens Exception). The following acts mostly date fromthe Golden Age of the LP -- and yet were unable or unwilling, in all cases, to record more than one. 
*****

The Roots of the Irish Disco/Dance Club Scene

Posted by Billyjam, March 17, 2011 06:10pm | Post a Comment
Paul Tarpey (Cheebah crew, Limerick, Ireland)
In keeping with the theme of Saint Patrick's Day for today's Amoeblog, I invited my good old friend, fellow Irishman and longtime fan of hip-hop and electronic music Paul Tarpey to be a guest Amoeblogger. For this post Paul, who is a Limerick-based DJ, photographer, & writer from that Irish city's Cheebah crew (who throw amazing parties and run the Cheebah and All That website), has sketched out a history of the Irish dance music club scene. Nowadays dance / electronic music and clubs are an integral part of the Irish music landscape. But it wasn't always that way; on the contrary. Long resistant to both hip-hop and electronic dance music, the homeland of U2 and countless other rock bands was for the longest time supportive of rock to the point of being discriminatory against disco and later dance/beat driven genres, something the guest Amoeblogger calls "rockist."

Tarpey said he felt compelled to research and write this piece when he "realised that the period before 1993 was overshadowed by the rockist history of the Irish music scene and that these early days merit some sort of record before memories fade and we forget about that scene’s pioneering activities." Here is what the Irish hip-hop/electronic music historian had to say:

Assemble any metropolitan club history, from the Paradise Garage in New York to The Hacienda in Manchester, and the same details are arrived at: innovative DJs within a specialised environment create their own rules to soundtrack a communal experience while being spurred on by a dedicated crowd. These classic night spots build slowly and peak after a few influential years, leaving behind them reputations and energy flashed memories. The Irish files to be dusted off from this period contain sections marked Flikkers and Sides. In remembering the history of these Dublin dance clubs, we consider the roots of an Irish dance movement that is as important in its own place as those overseas mythical dance palaces with their own associated cultural legacies.

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