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Mahssa's Massive CD Round Up - Theo Parrish, Walls, Plaid, Lawrence, DJ Shadow & more

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, October 7, 2011 05:05pm | Post a Comment
Theo Parrish
Theo Parrish
Ugly Edits
Ugly Edits 



Hello world, they're here. Unavailable for like, ever, now in one package complete with a hand-painted cover. Theo Parrish is one of Detroit’s most wanted exports especially in the past few years, but not too long ago, like many future techno-rebels that came before him, he was just another hustling Detroit DJ trying to make waves in the shadow of the city’s rich techno history. His indelible mark on the underground were highly limited, hand-labeled bootleg edit records of some of his favorite classic funk and disco tunes. The series of edits appropriately titled Ugly Edits, became highly desired rarities on the DJ and collector’s circuit. Rarities no more... as everyone should and can now hear his versions of Jil Scott, Harold Melvin & The Bluenotes, Freddie Hubbard, and Sylvester edits just to name a few somewhere other than YouTube. Cool.
Lawrence
Lawrence
Timeless

Cocoon  

out this week 2/24 & 3/3...depeche mode....gui boratto...sebastian tellier...

Posted by Brad Schelden, March 5, 2009 07:35pm | Post a Comment
I was always a way bigger fan of Depeche Mode than U2. I still remember the day I decided to become a Depeche Mode fan instead of U2. It was sort of like the day I decided to become a Blur fan instead of an Oasis fan. I know many people like both bands. I have many friends who like both U2 and Depeche Mode. But for me, I felt like it had to be one or the other. My brother was the U2 fan in the family, so that was probably the main reason I decided to turn my back on U2. To this day I have never really understood everybody's fascination with U2. I think U2 did end up becoming the more popular of the 2 bands. They both still have huge followings. Both are on a short list of rock bands from the 80's that can still sell out huge arena tours and sell tons of albums. U2's first album Boy came out in 1980. No Line On the Horizon is out this week and is the band's 12th album. Depeche Mode's first album Speak and Spell came out in 1981. Their new album, Sounds of the Universe, is also their 12th album. U2 beat them by about a year with their first album and are now beating them by about a month with their 12th album. Anton Corbijn obviously could not make up his mind like I did-- I think he likes both bands equally. He seems to have done almost every video and photo shoot for both bands. I probably will not even get around to hearing the new U2 album, but I am curious how the fans are receiving it. They are one of those bands who put out an album and the longtime fans justautomatically buy it. I am the same way with Depeche Mode. I am seriously counting down the days until the new album comes out -- April 21st. Only 47 days to go! But the new single is ready for you to listen to at least. I actually heard it on KROQ for the first time a couple of weeks ago. I probably heard "People are People" for the first time on KROQ as well, many years ago. I may not be a U2 fan, but I do love the U2 fans almost as much as I love the longtime Depeche Mode fans. I sort of stand with them in solidarity. It is not always easy to stand by a band for 28 years, but they make it worth it. Depeche Mode is one of those bands that I can't imagine my life without. One of those bands that we all have been made fun of for liking but also a band that has given us a whole new set of friends and a sort of musical solidarity with each other.
  
gui boratto take my breath away
Out last week was the new album by Gui Boratto. It is called Take My Breath Away. It is one of those albums that I actually wish there were some vocals on, or maybe a two disc version that included the album as it is now but also a version with vocals. I just fell in love with the song "Beautiful Life" from his first album Chromophobia, and I really do mean that I just fell in love with that song like a couple of days ago. My love affair with the music of Gui Boratto has been very exciting and sudden. Gui Boratto and I are actually the exact same age...not that it has anything to do with anything, but it is always interesting to me to find people born the same year as me. I feel like we share some sort of cosmic connection since we have been on the earth the same amount of years. We have lived through the same history of music. It is like when you find somebody who is born in your same home town but you don't meet them until you are in your thirties. The album takes a while to grown on you, but it can all happen in a couple of days if you listen to it a bunch. The album sort of takes you on a little musical journey. I do love instrumental albums and vocals do tend to mess up some great dance and electronica records, but I was just expecting some vocals on here. Once I moved beyond that I started to really like the album. Some of the songs really stand out and others you just sort of float through. The song "Besides" is sort of a reinterpration of a Cure or New Order song. I also really like the song "Les Enfants" which is right before that. The songs are long so make sure you wait until track 7 and 8 before you make up your mind about this album. The album could easily be a sort of new age soundtrack album. Some of it reminds me of Vangelis or Tangerine Dream or Klaus Schulze. But it doesn't necessarily sound like it was made 30 years ago, it just has elements of that. It also reminds me of the reasons that I love M83. But maybe I am just thinking about M83 a lot lately since I am going to see them on Saturday. It is music you could easily just listen to without paying much attention. It would just float in out of you and let you get along with your projects and help you work out your thoughts, but then every once in a while you stop and realize that one of the songs is really fantastic. There are also some great dancier tracks on the album. And the album ends with a somber sort of downer of a song --but it is a nice ending. It might take you back down, but it also gets you ready to just start the whole album over again. He also comes right before Hall & Oates on my computer, so it is a very interesting transition for me at least.

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Sweet Sweet Music

Posted by Mike Battaglia, April 16, 2007 12:43am | Post a Comment
    At Amoeba SF's electronica section, we've usually got at least four or five titles each month that we're extremely hyped on. Here's our current batch:



    First we've got Gui Boratto's Chromophobia on Kompakt. Boratto's Brazilian heritage gives him an edge when making his brand of tech-house, and that's an ear for rhythm. Straddling between minimal and electrohouse, Chromophobia avoids any LP pitfalls by working equally on a dancefloor as on headphones, it's got enough oomph to sound fantastic on a large sound system, but intricate enough that you notice small details while listening at home. I love his way with melody, particularly the swooping tones of "Terminal" and the bleep counterpoint in "Gate 7"; it gets quite emotional. The rhythms are key, though, and it's clear from the first track on that Boratto has a good grasp of syncopation and funk. Between the Hug and Field albums and now this, Kompakt are on a bit of a roll, again!



    Next up is We Are Together by Japanese producer Kuniyuki Takahashi, released on Mule Musiq. This is an album that is a unanimous vote amongst the electronica staff - everybody loves it (well, at least four of us). It's jazzy house music only in the loosest sense of the phrase, managing to perfectly walk the tightrope between noodly and stiff. The thing I like best about this album is its sense of space, the production on every track sounds so expansive and widescreen as to conjure up images of the music's physicality. In that sense it reminds me of the Burial album where there's a very conscious sense of three-dimensional space - it's a real "smokers delight". Check Kuni's MySpace page to hear more of this excellence.

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