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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Eagles of Death Metal

Posted by Amoebite, October 9, 2017 07:14pm | Post a Comment

Eagles of Death Metal What's In My Bag?

"The character of Catwoman was a big influence on my developing sexuality," confides Eagles of Death Metal frontman Jesse Hughes during his recent visit to Amoeba Hollywood. Hughes, also known as Boots Electric, starts our "What's In My Bag?" episode showing off a figurine of the aforementioned Catwoman from the classic '60s TV show and movie, Batman. "That's what I love about Amoeba," he continues. "You're able to really live within the eternal, time-frozen bubble of pop culture and experience it, if you wish to, in almost any generation." Hughes was full of humorous and insightful observations throughout our interview and proved to have quite the eclectic, and electric, tastes.

Eagles of Death Metal was formed in 1998 by longtime friends Josh Homme and Jesse Hughes. The band's debut came courtesy of Homme's The Desert Sessions Volume 3 & 4 later that year. With the increasing success of Queens of the Stone Age, Eagles of Death Metal was sidelined for a time before the release of their 2004 debut Peace, Love, Death Metal. A number of songs from the album were used in commercial, video game, and film projects, causing the band's profile to grow rapidly. The band released a followup, Death by Sexy, in 2006. They embarked on a series of tours in support of the album, headlining their own tour and supporting The Strokes, Peaches, Joan Jett, and for one show, Guns 'N Roses.

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15 American Pop Hits That Aren't in English

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 23, 2015 10:00pm | Post a Comment
In the United States there is no official language and in roughly 18% of American homes, one of hundreds of languages other than English is primarily spoken -- all of which, unless they're indigenousshould be considered "foreign languages." In Los Angeles, everyday you can hear pop songs on the radio in Cantonese, English, Farsi, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Spanish, and Vietnamese and although I often find that pop music is better when the lyrics are unintelligible, only a handful of pop songs in a language other than English have made the journey onto the pop charts -- here are fifteen (or so).






Harry Choates's "Jole Blon" (1946, French



Domenico Modugno's "Nel Blu Dipinto di Blu (Volare)"



Domenico Modugno's "Nel Blu Dipinto di Blu (Volare)" (1958, Italian







Ritchie Valens's “La Bamba” (1959, Spanish)


上を向いて歩こう



Kyu Sakamoto's "Sukiyaki" -- originally  "上を向いて歩こう" or "I Look Up as I Walk" (1961, Japanese)






Soeur Sourire's "Dominique" (1963, French) 


Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin



Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin's “Je T’Aime … Moi Non Plus” (1969, French)






Mocedades
“Eres Tu” (1973, Spanish)






Plastic Bertrand's “Ça Plane Pour Moi” (1977, French) 


Nena's "99 Luftballons"



Nena's "99 Luftballons" (1984, German






Falco's "Rock Me Amadeus" (1987, German) 






Los Lobos' "La Bamba" (1987, Spanish)






Enigma's "Sadeness (Part I)" (1991, Latin and French) 






Deep Forest
's "Sweet Lullaby" (1992, Baeggu)






Los Del Rio's "Macarena (Bayside Boys Mix)" (1996, Spanish) 


Shakira LA Tortura

 

Shakira with Alejandro Sanz's “La Tortura” (2005, Spanish)




 

Psy's "Gangnam Style" (2012, Korean)
*****
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(Wherein Spring Fever takes over the jukebox.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 28, 2011 04:25pm | Post a Comment

Well my little dreamlets, we’re ten days into Spring, and it’s already clear to me what music is going to carry me through into Summer – it’s all about synthetics. Synthpop, that is, of the late 70’s and early 80’s variety.

This amuses me, because for much of my life I detested a lot of the music I’m going to celebrate here. A lot of the hatred stemmed from being so unhappy in the 1980’s; by association, the music “sounded” like unhappiness. Think of it this way: When was the last time you were taking a shower and felt like listening to the soundtrack to Psycho? Exactly.

Some say that synthpop began when Giorgio Moroder teamed up with Donna Summer and created the hit single "I Feel Love." Calling this the “start” of synthpop is convenient, but an over-simplification, because so much came before that informed it. What can be said is that the song was influential, both in terms of inspiring artists who would go on to develop the synthpop genre, and give mainstream audiences a taste for it.

What follows are some synthpop songs that bring me joy. Many can be claimed by other sub-genres of music, but they're all related. Some are guilty pleasures – the sonic equivalent to a Snickers bar, in that they are bad for me, but make me feel great for the duration I’m imbibing – and others I stand by as solid accomplishments. I’m also putting a spell on them: listening to these songs will make you feel a little ticklish in the deepest part of your brain, which will result in your not hating your fellow man as much (even though they totally deserve your hate). Enjoy!

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