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Amoeba SF Acquires Unique Collection of 1970s Experimental & Art Music LPs

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, August 30, 2017 07:01pm | Post a Comment

We at Amoeba SF recently acquired a unique collection of 1970s Experimental and Art music, all on vinyl! Joan la BarbaraThis collection spans across the genres of Minimalism, Musique Concrete, post-Ornette Jazz, Tape Music, Spoken Sound Art, early Electronic, and more, and are all in excellent condition. These records will be made available for sale on Saturday, September 9th at Amoeba SF. Head to our stage (in the northwest corner of the store) to browse these gems. There will be staff on hand to help you view bagged items and to bring your choices to the cashiers. You must be in the store to purchase items for this one-day event. We won't be taking phone orders and we won't be putting these items on hold.

Some of the artists who are heavily represented in this collection:
Terry Riley (10 LPs)
Cecil Taylor (40 LPs!)
John Cage (15)
Steve Reich (15)
Anthony Braxton (25)
Philip Glass (many)
Art Ensemble of Chicago (20, PLUS numerous by its individual members)
Julius Hemphill (10)

Plus, there many rare and import recordings by David Murray, Leo Smith, Frank Lowe, Alvin Lucier, Meredith Monk, Henry Cow/Slapp Happy/Art Bears, Joan LaBarbara, Robert Ashley, Jon Gibson, Gordon Mumma, and more!

Of particular note, there are VERY RARE recordings by Joseph Beuys & Henning Christiansen, Charlemagne Palestine, LaMonte Young, Le Forte Four, and Allen Kaprow, just to name a few.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with clipping.

Posted by Amoebite, March 13, 2017 06:34pm | Post a Comment

clipping. What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

Looking for obscure classical, musique concrète, hip hop, noise, and film score recommendations? Luckily experimental hip hop trio clipping. stopped by Amoeba Hollywood and scoured the store for some pretty esoteric finds, including Dakota Hogback's Vicarious Sadism and Jean Schwarz's Erda / Suite N.

"The unusually experimental section of Amoeba Berkeley is the source of most of my music taste growing up," says William Hutson, adding, "underneath the experimental section, there's an experimental clearance section, which often has fantastic little gems or a weird CD-R." Hutson, along with fellow collaborators Jonathan Snipes and Daveed Diggs, had plenty of records to show us, most of which were off the beaten path.

clipping. Splendor & Misery Amoba Music The Los Angeles-based group consists of producers William Hutson and Jonathan Snipes plus rapper Daveed Diggs. In 2009, Hutson and Snipes began collaborating on power electronics and noise remixes of mainstream rap artists for fun. The trio became a serious project when Diggs joined a year later, writing his own verses for the tracks. They self-released a debut album, Midcity, in 2013. Although somewhat under the radar, the album attracted attention from Sub Pop, who signed the trio for their second album, CLPPNG.

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KRONOS FESTIVAL 2017 at SFJAZZ Center, February 2 - 4

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 30, 2017 05:20pm | Post a Comment

Kronos Festival 2017

Kronos Quartet
Kronos Quartet. Photo: Jay Blakesberg

San Francisco’s Kronos Quartet and their nonprofit Kronos Performing Arts Association will present KRONOS FESTIVAL 2017: Here and Now at the SFJAZZ Center, Thursday, February 2nd - Saturday, February 4th. With six concerts over three days, Kronos’ third annual hometown music festival will showcase the innovations of the Bay Area’s contemporary music community. With Kronos taking center stage for three evening concerts, as well as a Saturday morning family concert, performances will feature some of the region’s most engaging composers – from Minimalism pioneer Terry Riley to renowned Indian violinist Kala Ramnath – and transcendent guest musicians – from the breathtaking Persian singer Mahsa Vahdat to the ethereal sounds of traditional Vietnamese instrumentalist Vân-Ánh Võ.

This year’s festival will highlight the ingenious and arresting work of Iranian-American composer and San Francisco resident Sahba Aminikia, who will serve as the festival’s artist-in-residence. His work will be featured throughout the festival, as well as at an intimate afternoon survey that concludes with a conversation with the 35-year-old composer. “My music is inspired by human stories around me,” says Aminikia. “I am struck by generalizations about cultures unknown to us. We hear mostly about hardship and oppression, despite the fact that people of every nation find their own balance between hardship and pleasure. I would like to demonstrate a drop of the ocean of beauty that exists in every one of these cultures, including those in my home country. To make strong human connections and build understanding, I do this by telling stories. I am a storyteller. My compositions are, in fact, like One Thousand and One Nights: a human story within a human story within another human story.”

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Rare Steve Lacy LP Shows Up In Hollywood

Posted by Rick Frystak, October 7, 2013 03:43pm | Post a Comment

Steve Lacy has always been one of my favorite horn players since I first hear him in the mid 70’s. He delivers a liquid, speech-like sound with his soprano saxophone which he plays exclusively.  Influenced by trad jazz players, Cecil Taylor, Thelonious Monk and Gil Evans, Mr. Lacy composes and improvises with a quirky sense of melody unlike any other player around at the time or since, and his compositions reveal his very personal way of telling his stories. His staccato yet fluid attack, and almost vibrato-less legato stands out within the history of his axe. He has made many, many records (hundreds) and almost each one has its own individual sound and ultimate expression. Straight up swing to musique concrete to free improvisation are where Steve could be found at any moment, often simultaneously. His accompanists range from sitar duos to big band improv to sax/synthesizer/ drum outings, exploring all avenues of audible art. He also made many solo concerts, with just his soprano sax perhaps speaking the musical dialog about what was shaking at the moment. These concerts and recordings are a wonderful document of this artist’s creative depth.

I am fortunate to have met Steve when I had an in-store appearance with him while I was managing Rasputin’s Jazz and Soul record store in Berkeley, California in 1981. Steve is second from left, just to my right in this photo of that day (Rick Gillman far left, Lacy, Frystak, Michael Finney far right).

A kind and soft spoken personality belied his passionate, forward surging playing style.  His many bay-area fans that day were in heaven to be near this musical icon, myself included. He played later in the evening at U.C.Berkeley to a packed house. Steve passed in 2004 at age 69 years young, and I was fortunate to see him play multiple times, always searching and swinging in whatever context he found himself in.

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What We're Doing With What They've Done: Amoeba's "Vinyl Vaults"

Posted by Rick Frystak, April 28, 2013 07:15pm | Post a Comment

If you don't already know, we here at Amoeba are very much underway with our monumental archiving project for our website Amoeba.com, simply called the "Vinyl Vaults". It's a really spectacular beginning to what is and will be a huge undertaking in offering to the public digital transfers of the most remarkable older, oblique and hard to find works of creative peoples around the globe throughout the history of recording. I myself, am curating a large part of this, and have been very excitedly pulling out many, many unique pieces of vinyl out of the used LP buys that we take in at Amoeba's buying counters, and sending them into the ether (ie,our great team) to be archived and considered for sale on Amoeba.com. Our sound team takes these copies of the LPs, 7" singles and 78 rpm discs and digitizes them via ProTools, into 24-bit files, and then make mp3, mp4 and 16 bit .wav files (CD quality) from the 24-bit master and split up the sides into tracks for folks to download. We sometimes offer of the highest resolution 24-bit file as well for a certain title. And in many cases the original LP or 78 or 45 we used to digitize the sides is available right there next to the download. 


How do I decide what we save to digitize and offer to the public as I go through all these LPs? The records almost speak to me as I sift over the aquisitions we've purchased in the collections we buy. If I don't  know the record, I'll see the look of the cover, the paper texture, and the era of manufacture as the first things revealed. Even the weight and smell of the "thing". Exotic LPs have a feel to them, a way they communicate to the holder that they are something interesting, distinctly special, and a thing to be investigated further. If you've held a phonograph record in your hands  you know what I mean. Often the packaging will tell me what's inside, but how many records say "vocals" or "guitar" or "piano", and yet how different can all these records be? The actual sound on the disc is an exciting mystery of immense promise before I hear it. So then, to play a little bit, I "needle-drop" (sample bits of) so many records in a day. And it just so happens that Amoeba offers 1 1/2 minutes of free sample listening for all the records' songs, so this is comparable to how I listen to potential pieces for the Vaults. Once chosen, a disc will undergo a discerning ear's analysis and judgement for condition, and a little research to see if folks already know about this record. Ultimately, the bliss of finding a transcendent musical performance by a deceased or obscure artist or on a long-defunct label is intoxicating. And to think that others can later enjoy these provocative sounds via the "Vinyl Vaults"  is exhilarating.

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