Amoeblog

Halloween Residency with Roky Erickson at The Chapel in SF, 10/30-10/31

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 22, 2017 07:52pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music is thrilled to sponsor a two-night residency with rock legend Roky Erickson (of The 13th Roky EricksonFloor Elevators) at The Chapel in San Francisco on Monday, October 30th and Halloween -- Tuesday, October 31st. Opening for Roky will be The Death Valley Girls, the best thing in cult rock since Charlie Manson was free. Get your tickets now before these very special nights sell out!

Legendary rock & roll pioneer Roger Kynard "Roky" Erickson hails from Austin, Texas. He is, in the words of music writer Richie Unterberger, one of "the unknown heroes of rock and roll." As singer, songwriter, and guitar player for the legendary Austin band The 13th Floor Elevators, the first rock & roll band to describe their music as "psychedelic," Roky had a profound impact on the San Francisco scene when the group traveled there in 1966. While bands such as the Grateful Dead and the Jefferson Airplane had the their roots in traditional acoustic folk music, the Elevators unique brand of heavy, hard-rocking electric blues pointed to a new direction for the music of the hippie generation. The Elevators only had one chart hit, the Roky-penned "You're Gonna Miss Me," but their influence was far reaching. R.E.M., ZZ Top, Poi Dog Pondering, Judybats, T-Bone Burnett, Julian Cope, The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Cramps, and many more have all either recorded or played live versions of Roky's songs. In addition to these performers, Roky is an acknowledged influence on such diverse musicians as Robert Plant, Sonic Youth, The Butthole Surfers, Jon Spencer, The Damned, The Red Krayola, Pere Ubu, and The White Stripes.

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The Mad Alchemy Trip 2017 West Coast Tour

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 4, 2017 03:15pm | Post a Comment

Mad Alchemy Trip Tour 2017

LSD and the Search for God
LSD and the Search for God
Jesus Sons
Jesus Sons
The Asteroid No. 4
The Asteroid No. 4

Commemorate the 50-year anniversary of the Summer of Love with one of San Francisco's original trip-inducers! Amoeba Music is proud to sponsor the 2017 Mad Alchemy Trip tour, which will hit major cities and groovy clubs along the West Coast July 12 - July 22nd. Fantastic psych-inspired bands The Asteroid No. 4, LSD and the Search for God, The Stevenson Ranch Davidians, Jesus Sons, Dream Phases, Creatures Choir, and Family of Light Band will be accompanied by the mesmerizing projection work of the Mad Alchemy Liquid Light Show, making for a sensory experience that cannot be missed.

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Brightwell's Top 10: 1968

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 15, 2015 10:54am | Post a Comment
In 1857, Frenchman Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville patented his invention for recording sound, the phonautograph. Twenty years later, in 1877, someone first realized that his phonautograms could also play back recorded music. It was the same year, coincidentally, that Thomas Edison patented the phonograph and thus the age of recorded music began. In 2015, former Amoebite Matthew Messbarger posted an NME "Best of 1990" on my Facebook timeline and I decided to began reviewing the best songs of each year, from 1877 to the present, in random order.

May 1968 riots
May 1968 riots (source unknown)

The closest I came to experiencing 1968 was watching The Wonder Years, the first season of which was set in that year. From what I can tell it was a tumultuous year not just in the fictional Arnold household but throughout much of the world. There was the War in Vietnam, Black Power, Richard Nixon became president, the Prague Spring, Mai 1968, 68er-Bewegung, the Rote Armee Fraktion, the 日本赤軍, the Zodiac Killer, the Martin Luther King, Jr. assassination, the Robert F. Kennedy assassination, and the attempted assassination of Andy Warhol. In music both Red Foley and Frankie Lymon died prematurely; Hair debuted on BroadwayThe Beatles created Apple Records; and a whole lot of good music was released. 


One Album Wonders: The Zodiac

Posted by Eric Brightwell, August 17, 2015 11:07am | Post a Comment
The Zodiac - Cosmic Sounds

Zodiac
 were a studio group who released one album, Cosmic Sounds - Celestial Counterpoint with Words and Music, in May 1967. The members of Zodiac were respected session musicians Bud Shank, Carol Kaye, Cyrus Faryar, Emil RichardsHal Blaine, and Paul Beaver. Each song is devoted to the signs of Chaldean astronomical zodiac. The music was written by Canadian synthesizer pioneer Mort Garson
The spoken word narration was penned by Jacques Wilson and are narrated by Faryar in a voice reminiscent of Jim Morrison's who as part of The Doors, had recorded their debut in 1966 and released it in January 1967 to great acclaim.

The success of The Doors was a primary inspiration for the project. Elektra head Jac Holzman came up with the concept and hired Alex Hassilev, a member of The Limeliters, to produce. Hassilev brought Mort Garson to the project -- the two had just formed a production company together.

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Vive les minets - French Dandyism in the 1960s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 8, 2014 08:00pm | Post a Comment
As a fan of fashion, youth subculture, and the 1960s, at some point I was bound to be made aware of the French minet subculture. Obviously, since I'm writing about it, that momentous occasion has arrived at some point in my past. I can't remember when or where it occurred (the internet is a safe bet) but in the intervening years I've found very little about this stylish group. Compounding my frustration is the fact that what little that I have uncovered about minets is almost always written or recorded in French -- a language of which a month of skipping class at College les pins Castries did little to improve my command. The French Wikipedia (Wikipédia) is humorously blunt in its entry: un jeune homme vêtu à la mode, équivalent masculin de la minette. Last and least -- most of what has been written about minets in English is by writers discussing within the larger context of mod subculture -- a style tribe about which far too much is artlessly written and rehashed.

A minet in 1965


With that in mind, however, kindly allow me briefly add to the conversational clutter concerning mod, as its evolution is tied closely to that of the minet. Although today mod is often characterized as a mid-60s, working class subculture fueled by the holy trinity of amphetamines, scooters and soul music, it first appeared in the late 1950s when a largely middle class group of mostly Jewish teenagers with families in the clothing business and for whom the chosen drug was apparently coffee. Modernists, as they then to themselves referred, championed modern jazz over trad jazz (which was championed by the Acker Bilk-listening, bowler-hatted, beer-swilling, baggy sweater-and-duffle coated trads). Sharing their love of modern jazz were the beatniks, but their beardy, black, cultivated scruffiness was rejected in favor of the natty continental style associated with untouchable icons of French cool like Jean-Paul Belmondo and Alain Delon

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