Amoeblog

The Films Within Quentin Tarantino's 'Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood'

Posted by Amoebite, July 24, 2019 04:50pm | Post a Comment

Once Upon a TIme ... In Hollywood - Amoeba Music - photo by Aaron Araki

By Jackie Greed & Aaron Araki

In the summer and fall of 2018, Los Angeles was transported back to 1969…and it was a glory to behold! At any given moment, you could drive by a block or two that had suddenly been covered in '60s signage and window dressing, with vintage cars parked alongside the curb next to an old parking meter. All of this period makeover was courtesy of Quentin Tarantino’s production of his 9th film, Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood. As we stumbled upon each re-created neighborhood, we admired all the wonderful attention to detail given to the various businesses (especially finding all the ephemera captivating). Throughout all the sights that were taken in, there was an immediate attraction to any advertising given to a film or television show. From large billboards and movie theater marquees to bus benches and the buses themselves, here is a spotlight of the many movies and TV shows that were captured from the on-location filming of Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood.

cinerama dome - Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood photo by Jackie Greed

cinerama dome - once upon a time in hollywood - amoeba music - photo by Aaron ArakiThe first shooting location we came across was right next door to Amoeba Hollywood at the Cinerama Dome Theatre. While at first it appeared that the iconic theater was setting up to screen Bernard L. Kowalski's 1969 epic, Krakatoa: East of Java, it soon became apparent, as the street filled with an array of classic cars, that this was indeed the set for Tarantino's then recently announced new film. As the sun went down and the sky hit that "golden hour," normal traffic was stopped and the roar of all the pre-1970 automobiles overtook Sunset Boulevard, while extras in slim fitting suits and shaggy hippy garb began walking the sidewalk, and the camera started rolling.  

Continue reading...

Interview With Derv Gordon Of The Equals

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, June 23, 2019 10:40pm | Post a Comment

The Equals

By Audra Wolfmann

Often credited with being one of the first interracial rock groups in the U.K., The Equals also bear the Derve Gordondistinction of being a truly international band with an inclusive sound that revolutionized rock, bringing Jamaican and African touches to British beat. The Equals seamlessly integrated R&B, soul, and ska to bubblegum long before The Specials, Talking Heads, and The Clash (who covered The Equals). Formed in 1965, the original line-up consisted of Guyanese immigrant Eddy Grant on lead guitar, Jamaican brothers Derv and Lincoln Gordon on vocals and bass (respectively), and native Brits John Hall on drums and Pat Lloyd on rhythm guitar. Their album covers stood as a testament to a brave new integrated world, one that was just within sight in mid-60’s London. Surely, if anything could bring humanity together through our differences, it was dance music. The Equals first charted in 1968 with "I Get So Excited," “Baby, Come Back,” and "Softly Softly" – infectiously danceable songs that they are still well-known for to this day.

Front man Derv Gordon will be performing at Burger Boogaloo in Oakland on Sunday, July 7th at 2pm with an all new line-up of talented young musicians, also known as the Oakland-based band SO WHAT. I had the honor to speak with Mr. Gordon on the phone about 1960’s London, changing attitudes about race and national origin, what it’s like to be back out on the road, and the upcoming Burger Boogaloo festival. (More on Burger Boogaloo HERE!)

Continue reading...

Halloween Residency with Roky Erickson at The Chapel in SF, 10/30-10/31

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 22, 2017 07:52pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music is thrilled to sponsor a two-night residency with rock legend Roky Erickson (of The 13th Roky EricksonFloor Elevators) at The Chapel in San Francisco on Monday, October 30th and Halloween -- Tuesday, October 31st. Opening for Roky will be The Death Valley Girls, the best thing in cult rock since Charlie Manson was free. Get your tickets now before these very special nights sell out!

Legendary rock & roll pioneer Roger Kynard "Roky" Erickson hails from Austin, Texas. He is, in the words of music writer Richie Unterberger, one of "the unknown heroes of rock and roll." As singer, songwriter, and guitar player for the legendary Austin band The 13th Floor Elevators, the first rock & roll band to describe their music as "psychedelic," Roky had a profound impact on the San Francisco scene when the group traveled there in 1966. While bands such as the Grateful Dead and the Jefferson Airplane had the their roots in traditional acoustic folk music, the Elevators unique brand of heavy, hard-rocking electric blues pointed to a new direction for the music of the hippie generation. The Elevators only had one chart hit, the Roky-penned "You're Gonna Miss Me," but their influence was far reaching. R.E.M., ZZ Top, Poi Dog Pondering, Judybats, T-Bone Burnett, Julian Cope, The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Cramps, and many more have all either recorded or played live versions of Roky's songs. In addition to these performers, Roky is an acknowledged influence on such diverse musicians as Robert Plant, Sonic Youth, The Butthole Surfers, Jon Spencer, The Damned, The Red Krayola, Pere Ubu, and The White Stripes.

Continue reading...

The Mad Alchemy Trip 2017 West Coast Tour

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 4, 2017 03:15pm | Post a Comment

Mad Alchemy Trip Tour 2017

LSD and the Search for God
LSD and the Search for God
Jesus Sons
Jesus Sons
The Asteroid No. 4
The Asteroid No. 4

Commemorate the 50-year anniversary of the Summer of Love with one of San Francisco's original trip-inducers! Amoeba Music is proud to sponsor the 2017 Mad Alchemy Trip tour, which will hit major cities and groovy clubs along the West Coast July 12 - July 22nd. Fantastic psych-inspired bands The Asteroid No. 4, LSD and the Search for God, The Stevenson Ranch Davidians, Jesus Sons, Dream Phases, Creatures Choir, and Family of Light Band will be accompanied by the mesmerizing projection work of the Mad Alchemy Liquid Light Show, making for a sensory experience that cannot be missed.

Continue reading...

Brightwell's Top 10: 1968

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 15, 2015 10:54am | Post a Comment
In 1857, Frenchman Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville patented his invention for recording sound, the phonautograph. Twenty years later, in 1877, someone first realized that his phonautograms could also play back recorded music. It was the same year, coincidentally, that Thomas Edison patented the phonograph and thus the age of recorded music began. In 2015, former Amoebite Matthew Messbarger posted an NME "Best of 1990" on my Facebook timeline and I decided to began reviewing the best songs of each year, from 1877 to the present, in random order.


May 1968 riots (source unknown)

The closest I came to experiencing 1968 was watching The Wonder Years, the first season of which was set in that year. From what I can tell it was a tumultuous year not just in the fictional Arnold household but throughout much of the world. There was the War in Vietnam, Black Power, Richard Nixon became president, the Prague Spring, Mai 1968, 68er-Bewegung, the Rote Armee Fraktion, the 日本赤軍, the Zodiac Killer, the Martin Luther King, Jr. assassination, the Robert F. Kennedy assassination, and the attempted assassination of Andy Warhol. In music both Red Foley and Frankie Lymon died prematurely; Hair debuted on BroadwayThe Beatles created Apple Records; and a whole lot of good music was released. 


10. Donovan - "Hurdy Gurdy Man"



Donovan's "Hurdy Gurdy Man" has a descending melody and tells that tale of a meaningful encounter with a stranger -- rather like The Small Faces' "Green Circles," released the previous year. Turn up the heavy psych, add a dash of tanpura and lines like "histories of ages past" though, and you have a winning and sufficiently different formula.

9. Jeannie C. Riley - "Harper Valley P.T.A."



"Harper Valley P.T.A." was written by Tom T. Hall and first offered to fellow Kentuckyian Skeeter Davis, who shockingly passed on it. That it sounded more than a little like Bobbie Gentry's "Ode to Billie Joe," a hit the previous year, didn't seem to work against it and Jeannie C. Riley, had a big hit.

8. Glen Campbell - "Wichita Lineman"


My favorite Jimmy Webb composition is this song which has the magisterial tone of the best songs by Lee Hazlewood or Scott Walker. For younger readers, ask your grandparents what linemen and telephones were. 

7. Jimi Hendrix "All Along The Watchtower"


Bob Dylan
's constipated-man-shouting-into-a-bucket singing style has always, for me, been an insurmountable stumbling block to enjoying him. Luckily, more musically inclined musicians like The Byrds or, in this case, Jimi Hendrix, were capable of polishing them into something precious. I especially love the fantasy rock lyrics of this one which are are pure proto-prog pretension and apparently inspired by the Book of Isaiah.
6. Dionne Warwick - "I'll Never Fall in Love Again"


Composed by Missourian Burt Bacharach with his most celebrated lyricist, Hal David for the musical Promises, Promises, the soundtrack of which I discovered amongst my mom's records as a kid (although the plot of the musical for me remains a mystery). Whatever the context, the song is Brill Building Pop at itsmost perfect, wonderfully sung by future psychic hotline hostess Dionne Warwick when she was still a paragon of class and fashionability. 

5. The Doors - "Hello, I Love You"


Baseless arguments made by humorless haters require that the boors making them conveniently ignore the fact that in 1968 no American band was as handy with the two minute pop ditty as The Doors. "Hello I Love You" dates back to 1965, when they first recorded it as a harmonica-driven garage rocker. In 1968 it was re-recorded as a Seeds-ish, fuzzed out garage rocker. For all the criticism of Morrison's admirable lyrical ambitions, here was a number one hit written about a very serious subject, being interested in a pretty woman strolling through Venice

4. Leonard Cohen -- "Hey, That's No Way To Say Goodbye"


Leonard Cohen
's "Hey, That's No Way To Say Goodbye" was the B-side to the similarly-wired "Suzanne" and maybe my preference for the former stems mostly from the fact that it's slightly less overplayed... and over-covered. When it has been covered its been by the likes of Ian McCulloch and Michael Monroe -- two more points in its favor.

3. Pink Floyd -- "Remember a Day"


One of the last instances where The Pink Floyd were able to approach the brilliance they'd known under the guidance of English rock's greatest genius, Syd Barrett. Tellingly, it wasn't written by either Roger Waters nor David Gilmour but organist Richard Wright. Also, it was relegated to the B-side of Waters's enjoyable but frankly inferior "Let There Be More Light." 

2. The Zombies - "Time of the Season"


The Zombies' Odessey and Oracle is a brilliant album whose classics like "Brief Candles" and "Beechwood Park" should've been massive singles. Instead their label made strange choices for singles with "Friends of Mine" and "Butcher's Tale (Western Front 1914)" which, as with "Time of the Season," were all flops. "Time of the Season" would become a massive hit when re-released, though, after which The Guess Who recorded their derivative (and best) song, "Undun," and the psychedelic jazz-rock classic would go on to be used to convince consumers to purchase Tampax, Fidelity Investments, Sprite, Nissan Tiidas, and Toyota RAV4s.

1. The Small Faces - "Mad John"


In 1968 The Small Faces released "Lazy Sunday," "Mad John," and "The Universal" as singles. "Lazy Sunday" would probably win in a landslide over the other two (does anyone really love "The Universal"?) but "Mad John" gets my vote as the best single of 1968. It's not an obvious single, taken from from the band's psychedelic Finnegans Wake-esque quasi-concept album, Ogden's Nut Gone Flake and bookended with Stanley Unwin's strange recounting what happened when a large fly brought Happiness Stan to a hermit so that he might learn the cause of the moon's waning. Whenever I attempt to prepare myself for the possibility of one day becoming homeless it pops into my mind. It was only released as a single in the US, on Halloween.

Other great songs of 1968: Brigitte Bardot et Serge Gainsbourg - "Bonnie And Clyde," Deep Purple's cover of "Hush," Hugh Masekela's "Grazing In The Grass," Otis Redding's "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay," Stevie Wonder's "For Once in My Life," Classics IV's "Spooky," Tammy Wynette's "Stand By Your Man," Steppenwolf's "Magic Carpet Ride," The Bee Gees' "I Started a Joke," The Turtles' "Elenore," Iron Butterly's "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida," and Tommy Roe's "Dizzy." Let me know what songs would you add to the list.

*****

Follow me at ericbrightwell.com
<<  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  >>  NEXT