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Our First Ever LIVE "What's In My Bag?" Episode Features Juana Molina

Posted by Amoebite, May 15, 2019 12:07pm | Post a Comment

Juana Molina - What's In My Bag? Live

We were honored to have Argentinian electronic / experimental / folk artist Juana Molina play selections and share stories in our first ever LIVE What's In My Bag? interview. Filmed in front of an Ableton Loop audience at The Montalban Theatre in Hollywood and moderated by Alejandro Cohen of LA's Dublab internet radio station, Molina gave us an intimate peek into some of the records that mean the most to her.

Juana Molina is a Buenos Aires-based singer, songwriter, and actress known for her experimental folktronica sound. Born to Argentine tango singer Horacio Molina and actress Chunchuna VillafaƱe, she began playing guitar at age five and recorded a Mother's Day song with her father, which was released as a single. Molina's television career began in 1988 when she landed a role on La noticia rebelde and then on El mundo de Antonio Gasalla. As her reputation as a skilled sketch comedy artist grew, she launched her own TV show, Juana y sus hermanas, in 1991. By this time she was one of Argentina's most famous comics but, feeling that she had strayed too far from her lifelong dream of being a musician, Molina canceled the show in 1994.

Juana Molina HaloIn 1996, she released her debut LP, Rara. The album was not well-received in her home country, where fans expected and wanted her comedy persona to perform instead. In 1998, Molina relocated to Los Angeles and began working on a sophomore LP, Segundo; she would return to Buenos Aires to produce the album, which was released via Domino. The LP raised her profile internationally. David Byrne bought the album, became a fan, and invited Molina to open for him on tour. Molina released albums consistently over the course of the next two decades, winning acclaim in Argentina and around the world. Her most recent release is 2017's Halo.

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Interview With Damon Krukowski

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, May 14, 2019 05:24pm | Post a Comment

By Jon LonghiDamon Krukowski

Damon Krukowski and his wife/partner Naomi Yang have been making music together since the late nineteen eighties. Their bands Galaxie 500 and Magic Hour were two of the most influential groups of the dream pop movement, and the two have kept making music ever since as the duo Damon and Naomi. Their music is frequently described as either psychedelia or psych pop. The two share an uncanny chemistry as musicians. Damon's guitar blends perfectly with Naomi's keyboards and their vocal harmonies are just heavenly. At their show at The Lab in SF on April 17th, Damon said he's seen their music make even the toughest bouncers at bars they've played start crying. It's beautiful, heartbreaking music. Check them out. Everything they've ever recorded is excellent. Damon stopped by Amoeba SF on April 18th and we got to ask him a few questions.

Amoeba: So you're on a book tour with some Damon and Naomi shows?

Damon: Yes I'm doing a book tour for my new MIT Press book, Ways of Hearing, and we're doing a couple shows along the way. We just played at The Lab last night [4/17]. Tonight [4/18] I'm doing a book event at City Lights Bookstore at 7pm. Come check it out.

Amoeba: What's the book about? I've heard it's a very visual interactive experience that almost reads as a graphic novel.

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A CRY For CECIL TAYLOR, My Avant Gardfather, 1929-2018

Posted by Rick Frystak, May 8, 2019 07:57pm | Post a Comment

Cecil Taylor

Photo by unknown/illustration by Rick Frystak
 

Welcome back to The Choice Bin. It's 1973, UCLA's Royce Hall, a few notches up from what it is today satus-wise as there just weren't many halls to showcase serious music in '73. Big deal anytime or place, these artists in L.A. then, (like say, Stevie Wonder) so the town was abuzz. Cecil Taylor is here to play a solo piano recital. Lee has Rhino stocked. Lingerers linger. Jivers jive. Clowns clown. There's a festival vibe, it was called Newport Jazz Fest west or whatever. This night is just Cecil.

The concert begins. Each note, chord harmony, repetition, arpeggio, triad, cluster, question-and-answer; a sensation of logic and emotion. To some,''noise''. This man went to the New York Conservatory. Cecil is here in UCLA playing a huge 10-foot Bosendorfer piano and the paint is already coming off the walls. Folks are on the edge of their seats.

OMG, it's Cecil my main man, my idol in the ''out'' music. I have "all" his albums. I'm in the SAME ROOM with him! Tonight, Cecil has come from a whisper (he hadn't begun dancing out to the piano yet) to a brilliantly built mountain of sound.

It's getting more and more and more intense when all of a sudden, a man sitting almost dead-center STANDS UP,TAKES OFF HIS SHIRT and begins dancing and...YELLING!! I couldn't believe what I was seeing for a split second, but then that same feeling came over me, but I stayed in my seat. It was like a shot of adrenaline, more exciting than ANYTHING I'd ever heard, right then and there...the physical manifestation of the sounds we were hearing, driving us to yelling!

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Shooter Jennings

Posted by Amoebite, May 7, 2019 05:03pm | Post a Comment

Shooter Jennings - What's In My Bag?

In our 600th What's In My Bag? episode, countrysinger-songwriter Shooter Jennings explored the laserdisc section at Amoeba Hollywood and picked up LPs by David Bowie, Hank Williams Jr., and Jaime Wyatt. "I went right for David Bowie," he told us. "I've been listening to a lot of David Bowie lately. Me and a friend of mine been working on something (and) we've just been plowing through Bowie. He's one of my favorites of all time."

The son of country music royalty Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter, Shooter Jennings grew up on tour buses, sometimes playing drums in Waylon's band. He began playing drums at age five, studied Shooter Jennings - Shooter - Amoeba Musicpiano at age eight, and took up the guitar at age fourteen. Shooter moved to Los Angeles in 2001 and started the rock band Stargunn. He signed to the label Universal South Records in 2005 for the release of his solo debut Put the "O" Back in Country. Album single "Fourth of July" peaked at #22 on the Billboard Hot Country charts. That same year, Shooter took on the role of his father in the Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash biopic Walk the Line.

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Having A Movie Moment with Jon Longhi: It's All Black And White

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 30, 2019 06:24pm | Post a Comment

By Jon Longhi

Recently we've been treated to an avalanche of new Blu-ray releases of classic fifties black and white movies. In this article, I'm going to focus on a couple of recent sci-fi and horror classics. In the 1950s, Hollywood turned America’s fear of atomic bombs and their fallout into drive-in movie gold. An endless stream of radioactive monsters invaded movie screens and the public ate them up with a seemingly insatiable appetite. Now, decades later, many of these drive-in classics are being remastered and released on Blu-ray. There are too many to review in one month so I’ll just focus on a couple of the best of them:

The Creature From The Black Lagoon Legacy Collection, Universal:
It looks like The Creature From The Black Lagoon has finally been fixed. This Legacy Collection actually Creature From The Black Lagooncame out in the fall of 2018, but it was one of the most screwed up Blu-ray releases in recent history. The first Creature film has been out on Blu-ray for years but everyone has anxiously been awaiting the remastered sequels. Everything else in the Legacy series had been released on Blu-ray and the Creature set was one of the last two to be put out. The first Creature film looked just fine, but the sequels were a disaster. Universal had completely screwed up the mastering on the disc to the point where the entire run eventually had to be recalled. Here at the store we've had this Legacy set on backorder for months, but we just started getting new copies in the past three weeks. These are finally the corrected discs. There's still some griping online about the quality of the sequels though. I can understand the complaints, some of the scenes still look a little soft, but I'm pretty sure the blurriness one sees here and there was in the original film elements. The majority of the scenes are crystal clear and finally in hi-def. The underwater scenes look especially immaculate and you can see details of the creature costume that were never discernible before. The Creature From The Black Lagoon has always been my favorite Universal monster movie. It's just a perfect little story that is well told. The sequels are pretty great as well even though they kind of retread the original. The gill man has one of the best designs in monster history, he's fearsome yet still slightly human. The story is a simple straight to the point narrative: a team of scientists travel to the depths of the Amazon in search of a fossilized missing link between humans and sea creatures. Instead, they find the still-living real McCoy and all hell breaks loose as they fight for their lives. The film is kind of like the ultimate distillation of man verses nature.

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