Amoeblog

New Electronic/House 12" at Amoeba Hollywood: Kirk Degiorgio, Donato Dozzy, Chymera, Lindstrom, Idjut Boys & More..

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, March 17, 2010 04:21pm | Post a Comment

KIRK DEGIORGIO
Membrane 12"
Planet E

"1990 was the decade Kirk established healthy roots with the network trio of Detroit producers: Derrick May, Juan Atkins and Kevin Saunderson. In preparation for Kirk's most influential journey to the US, he collaborated demos with Ed Handley and Andy Turner under the collective The Black Dog. During his inspirational visit to Detroit, Kirk took notice of the affordable studio setups he observed at Transmat, Metroplex and KMS. Consequently Kirk sold his entire record collection upon his return to London and invested in an Atari, Akai S950 sampler, a broken TB303 and a Roland R8 drum machine. To complete his Detroit-inspired studio, the last pieces were actually loaned from Derrick -- including a Kawai K3 and the infamous DX100. Fast forward to the more present time and Kirk has released purist techno EPs for an EMI subsidiary New Religion. For the same label he has collaborated with Dan Keeling under the name Critical Phase and together with Alex Bond has also coordinated the joint ART-New Religion compilation The Electric Institute. On this compilation Kirk shocked purists with the techno breaks track 'Whatever Happened To The Cosmic Kid,' which was co-written with Dan Keeling and Chris Martin of Coldplay. Kirk's revolutionary pulse has been recognized and is credited with being the first known professional DJ to use Ableton Live alongside vinyl for his DJ sets. A tour of Japan 2002 saw him use Live exclusively which he has now done ever since in venues worldwide. Kirk paved the way for the current popularity of laptop DJing."



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Flossin' Season - Leprechaun Movies, Music, &c

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 17, 2010 12:30pm | Post a Comment

Vintage Leprechauns

Vintage St. Patrick's Day
LeprechaunEveryone knows a couple of things about leprechauns (aka lurachmain, Vintage Leprechaunlurican, leprechawn, lepracaun, leprechaun, lubberkin and lurgadhan). They’re small, tricky gingers that, if caught, will show you the money. One theory about the word’s origin is that it comes from luacharma'n (or luchorpán), the Irish word for “pygmy.” Another theory is that the word is derived from leath bhrogan, meaning “shoemaker.” Not as many people know but leprechauns usually find employment as cobblers or shoemakers. Presumably they make and repair the shoes of other faerie folk and Tuatha Dé Danann, because how else could they make money off each other if they all practice the same trade? And leprechauns make money. If you lay your eyes on one, don’t look away or they’ll vanish.

Although the Irish believe that leprechauns emigrated from the island of Fir Bolg, they’ve nonetheless become one of the most common stereotypical images of Eire, along with that Romano-British Englishman, Sanctus Patricius, whose saint day is (of course) today.

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Remembering Tammi Terrell, Who Died 40 Years Ago Today

Posted by Whitmore, March 16, 2010 08:11pm | Post a Comment
Tammi Terrell
40 years ago today
, Thomasina Winifred Montgomery, better known as Tammi Terrell, died of a brain tumor just a month short of her 25th birthday. She was one of that incredible crop of 1960’s soul diva’s who knew how to seduce or belt out a song. Today she is best remembered for her Motown duets with Marvin Gaye with singles like “Ain't No Mountain High Enough”, “Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing”, “Your Precious Love” and “You're All I Need to Get By.”
 
Born in Philadelphia in 1945, as a teenager Tammi Terrell recorded for the Scepter/Wand label, releasing two solo discs under the name Tammy Montgomery. Both singles released in 1961, “If You See Bill,” and “Voice of Experience,” failed to chart. At about the same time, she also did session work doing backup vocals for the legendary Shirelles. In 1963 she was discovered by James Brown and joined his Revue. While under contract with Brown, Tammi released one single on his Try Me label, “I Cried.” At the time it was rumored that Terrell and Brown were romantically involved, Tammi Terrellsomething that didn’t quite fly with her parents, leading to her quick departure; she was replaced by Anna King. Next she signed with Checker Records' label, releasing one single, “If I Would Marry You.” Unfortunately her string of unsuccessful releases continued. In 1965 she signed with Motown, Barry Gordy changed her name to Tammi Terrell, and there she finally scored a couple of Top 30 singles on the R&B charts with 1966’s "I Can't Believe You Love Me" and "Come on and See Me." But it was when she was paired up with Marvin Gaye in 1967 that success finally came, fast and furious, with five top three R&B charting singles in just over a year. But all her success was short lived. On October 14, 1967, while in concert at Ogden Hall at the Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia, she collapsed on stage in Gaye's arms. She was rushed to the hospital, where she was later diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor. She had complained of severe migraine headaches for some time.
 Tammi Terrell
For years now stories have circulated that Tammi was the victim of a physically abusive boyfriend who had not only thrown her down a flight of stairs, but had also hit her over the head with a steel chair. But no actual allegations were ever proved. Terrell would undergo eight separate operations over the next three years for cancer; suffering from memory loss, numbness and weakness, blindness, she become far too sick to work. Eventually she was confined to a wheelchair and her weight dropped to under 85 lbs.
 
Tammi Terrell died on March 16th, 1970. She’s buried in Mount Lawn Cemetery in Philadelphia.
 
Marvin Gaye was devastated by her death. He took a long hiatus from live performances. And in his period of self-isolation, amidst his depression he re-evaluated his whole concept of what music might say. The result was the classic 1971 album What's Going On, a meditative, low key work which dealt, in part, with Tammi Terrell's death and issues of the world around him -- injustice, suffering and hatred.



The Employee Interview Part XXIV: Erin

Posted by Miss Ess, March 16, 2010 04:50pm | Post a Comment
Erin
Rock Floor Person Extraordinaire
2.5 yrs employment


Miss Ess: First, let's talk about something we both love: the new Joanna Newsom record. have one on me joanna newsomTell me, what is it that makes it so fantastic for you, and what are your favorite tracks?


Erin: Okay, so I am really into the new Joanna Newsom record [Have One on Me] for a number of reasons. I was obsessed, totally in love with her last album, Ys, but that album was very structured, very rigid compared to this one. It was definitely a song cycle, whereas this one is a little more free form. She's loosened up quite a bit and her singing has improved. The things I love about her are still the same -- her love of words, her incredibly poetic turns of phrase -- but she has relaxed a little in a way that I'm enjoying. Some of the songs on here, like "Good Intentions Paving Company" and especially "Baby Birch," are some of the best she's ever written, I think. She's really only getting better. 

ME: What else is turning on your record player these days?

Erin: I've also been listening to Greg Gardner's comp In A Cloud -- all really great local artists. My favorite track on here is the Paula Fraser one. And the first Giant Sand record -- Valley of Rain. 
les georges leningrad
ME: I know you love Montreal. What bands from Montreal are you favorites? What do you think of the music scene up there?

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Films and Video Games

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 16, 2010 12:34pm | Post a Comment

With Tron – Legacy, the sequel to a movie about video games, scheduled to open in theaters this coming December and Tron – Evolution, a video game based on a sequel of a movie about a video game scheduled for release in November, now seems like a perfect time to look at the Ouroboros-like nature of film and video games and film.

Tron The Wizard WarGames Joy Sticks Cloak & Dagger Cloak & Dagger

In the early 1980s, Hollywood still sometimes made films that weren’t re-makes, adaptations or sequels and before there were movies adapted from video and computer games, there were movies about video and computer games. Tron (1982) was the granddaddy of them all. The Wizard (1989), WarGames (1983), Joysticks (1983), Cloak and Dagger (1984) and The Last Starfighter (1984) soon followed. 

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