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Noise Pop 2018 Announces Phase 1 Line-Up

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 30, 2017 05:16pm | Post a Comment

Noise Pop 2018

Noise Pop, the Bay Area’s premiere indie music and arts festival, returns with events all over San Francisco and Oakland, February 19 - 25! They have just announced Phase 1 of the music lineup for the 26th annual festival! The full music lineup will be announced in several phases between now and February. Phase 1 general badges are available for $175 once Early Bird badges are sold out (and Early Birds have already sold out!). General badge prices will go up with the Phase 2 lineup announcement, so get your tickets now!

The festival features an array of amazing performances not only from national music acts, but also from an impressive variety of established and up-and-coming Bay Area artists.

Check out the PHASE 1 MUSIC LINEUP:Noise Pop 2018
Tune-Yards
Real Estate
Black Rebel Motorcycle Club
Parquet Courts
San Fermin (feat. The Magik*Magik Orchestra)
WHY?
Ben UFO
Superchunk
Mount Eerie
Rostam
Cuco
Geographer
Bully
Girlpool
Enter Shikari
Japanese Breakfast
Jay Som
Bahamas
No Age
Bruno Major
Night Beats
Shallou
Sean Rowe
Carla Dal Forno (**first-ever US performance**)
Single Mothers
Milk Teeth
Melkbelly
Dick Stusso
Hand Habits

Sophisticated Monster Muu-zak and Buried Horror Films to Howl For

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 29, 2017 05:26pm | Post a Comment

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show


Close you eyes and picture in your mind that Gomez and Morticia Addams are throwing a party. One can not imagine them playing Bobby "Boris" Pickett's "Monster Rap" or Elvira's "2 Big Pumpkins." I see Lurch pulling the cobwebs off their record collection and tossing the needle on such classics as The Zanies' "Russian Roulette," Ken Nordine and his Kinsmen's "Strollin Spooks," and of course all five of the amazing Frankie Stein and the Ghouls records.







If you find yourself humming the theme to Experiment in Terror every time you cross the Emperor Norton bridge late at night or cruising up to Twin Peaks for a super burrito at Taqueria Miraloma, then this is the truly the Hallow's eve music for you. The 1960's was the golden ghoul era of Monster music and here are a just a few LPs and 45s to keep your eyes peeled for...not to mention a couple spooky flicks.

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Light In The Attic Releases first Anthology for their Japan Archival Series

Posted by Kelly Sweeney Osato, October 27, 2017 11:56pm | Post a Comment
Japan Archival Series Light In The Attic various artists collection Even A Tree Can Shed Tears: Japanese Folk & Rock 1969-1973 rare kissa rock angura movement kissa jazz new music 1960s 60s tokyo scene

Record shopping in Japan is an incredible and humbling experience. Since moving to the Connecticut of Japan last Spring I've enjoyed exploring as many record stores in and around Tokyo as possible, regularly testing the limits of my willpower wallet while discovering one long-sought gem after another. What's more, records here are more often than not found in great if not near mint condition and almost always come crisply wrapped in those snazzy resealable outer sleeves. Whether you're digging through one of Japan's many mega music emporiums, curated record boutiques, or any old hideaway/warehouse situation stuffed windows-to-the-walls with miscellaneous wax, the scope of excellently kept, hard-to-find vinyl stocked in record stores here never fails to amaze. That said, scoring coveted original releases by Japanese artists at "the nice price" can be surprisingly tough, which means acquiring the same prized/pricey titles stateside can be doubly difficult and hardly worth it (itinerant flippers be damned). Enter the warm glow of Light In The Attic Records...

[quick side note: All new CDs and LPs from Light In The Attic, including their sub-labels Modern Classics, Future Days, Mondo, Death Waltz, and Waxwork, will be 20% off at our stores Monday, October 9th - Sunday, November 5th 2017! For more info go here]
Japan Archival Series Light in the Attic label Japanese music anthologies collection various artists vinyl
Since announcing their Japan Archival Series last April, the Seattle-based label has finally brought their inaugural release for the project to US ears with Even A Tree Can Shed Tears: Japanese Folk & Rock 1969-1973, the "first-ever fully licensed compilation of this music to be released outside Japan". This collection of nineteen tracks spans an era when Japan's youth culture shifted from championing the Surf instrumental (think The Ventures) Eleki trend and the Beatles-inspired Group Sounds (G.S.) movement that dominated Japanese pop culture in the 1960s to more poignant, living room singer/songwriter sounds reminiscent of Bob Dylan, mellow Laurel Canyon boho vibes, soft psychedelia, and miscellaneous Americana (à la The Band and Neil Young). Fueled by mass student protest demonstrations and an underground ("angura") movement bent on subverting long-standing stuffy traditions, young musicians rejected Beatlemania replications in favor creative authenticity, giving birth to fresh genres like the aptly named New Music and Kissa Rock (literally "Café Rock, so-called due to the venues they frequently played). Some of Japan's most beloved and influential music-makers made a name for themselves during this crucial period, and many of those heavy-hitters whose early works are featured on this comp would go on to further enrich the fabric of music history in Japan and beyond long after the angura movement's hippie heyday. For example, Haruomi Hosono, who lends his distinct James Taylor-esque vocals to two tracks on this compilation (both as a member of influential Folk Rock band Happy End and with a track from his 1973 self-titled solo debut), would later form the innovative electronic band Yellow Magic Orchestra with Ryuichi Sakamoto and Yukihiro Takahashi (whose Sadistic Mika Band bandmate Kazuhiko Kato also has a solo track featured on this comp). This example is by no means representative of the extent of Hosono's legacy as one of the most important figures in Japanese music history and his career trajectory is but one slippery slope of many rabbit holes one can fall into exploring via this compilation. Plus, aside from being a lovely aesthetic object featuring original artwork by illustrator Heisuke Kitazawa, the total package includes extensive liner notes and bios (put together by compiler/producers Yosuke Kitazawa and Jake Orrall) that dig deeper into this music that has been, as Light in The Attic puts it, "tantalizingly out of reach for decades" while setting the stage for overlaps and other points of interest that'll surely connect this particular anthology to forthcoming releases and reissues for the Japan Archival Series.

Despite Negative Publicity, Rolling Loud Bay Area Festival Was Peaceful & Positive Event [Photo Version + SoCal Dec 16/17 Lineup]

Posted by Billyjam, October 27, 2017 12:43pm | Post a Comment


Despite the predominantly negative press that the recent Bay Area stop of the Rolling Loud hip-hop festival received, the Miami-founded festival (October 21st & 22nd in the Bay & scheduled next for SoCal December 16th & 17th) was an overall well behaved, peaceful music-loving affair. With a line-up of mostly new generation acts catering to a young, enthusiastic audience present to simply party (some too much) and enjoy the music, the majority’s good conduct was marred by the bad behavior of a handful. The two-day, two stages at Mountain View’s Shoreline Amphitheater included memorable performances from such artists as Travis Scott, ScHoolboy Q, Lil Uzi VertYoung Thug21 Savage, Lil Yee, Lil Wayne and the Bay Area’s own Nef The Pharaoh.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Cedric Bixler-Zavala of At The Drive-In

Posted by Amoebite, October 25, 2017 03:26pm | Post a Comment

Cedric Bixler-Zavala (At the Drive-In) What's in My Bag?

"To me John Carpenter sounds like he should have been in a Krautrock band," says Cedric Bixler-Zavala, lead singer for At the Drive-In and The Mars Volta, during his recent What's In My Bag? interview. Picking up a 12" record of Carpenter's theme to his film Assault On Precinct 13, Bixler-Zavala compares the moody, synth-based sound of his music to the experiential, avant-garde form of music that came out of Germany in the late '60s and '70s. He also found some genuine Krautrock, in the form of Cluster's debut record, an atmospheric, instrumental soundscape. "All roads lead to Germany, in regards to interesting out there music," he tells us, adding, "I love to draw to this kind of stuff because it just makes me feel like I'm there."

Grammy-winning musician Cedric Bixler-Zavala made his name as the frontman of At the Drive-In. He would later go on to earn further acclaim for his work with The Mars Volta. Throughout his varied career, he has performed with dozens of bands, sometimes playing drums, sometimes singing in English, Latin, and Spanish. He is renowned for his energetic, raucous on-stage performances.

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