Amoeblog

Airbrush Artists Memorialize Tupac at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Amoebite, September 14, 2011 05:54pm | Post a Comment
On the fifteenth anniversary of Tupac Amaru Shakur's passage from this sphere, Makaveli Ronald "Riskie" Brent (creator of the Makaveli Don Killuminati cover painting) & his homie Neneki "Nick" McGee, came by Amoeba Hollywood to pay homage with a live painting session in memoriam to the man born Lesane Parish Crooks.

Busting out the airtanks & the airbrush, they did a plein air, public demonstration of the nexus of talent & passion, inspiring reminisces from appreciative passerbys who rhapsodized about Tupac sightings & his impact on their lives.



Airbrush Artists    Airbrush Artists

Airbrush Artists    Airbrush Artists

Airbrush Artists    Airbrush Artists

Airbrush Artists    Airbrush Artists

Hip-Hop Author Marcus Reeves Discusses "Somebody Scream! Rap Music's RIse To Prominence in the Aftershock of Black Power"

Posted by Billyjam, July 19, 2008 12:24pm | Post a Comment
Marcus Reeves ("Someboday Scream!" author)
Marcus Reeves
, former editor of the the Source hip-hop magazine and contributor to such publications as the New York Times, the Washington Post, Rolling Stone, and Vibe magazine, recently had his book Somebody Scream! (Rap Music's Rise To Prominence In The Aftershock of Black Power published by Faber and Faber Inc.

Like Jeff Chang's critically acclaimed hip-hop history Can't Stop Won't Stop, Somebody Scream likewise takes an analytical look at hip-hop -- a musical form that, like rock before it, is now all grown up and going through its own kind of mid-life crisis. Cornel West called Reeves' book "a strong  timely book for the new day in hip-hop" and he is right.

I recently had the opportunity to catch up with the East Coast based author to talk about his new book, Somebody Scream,  and its subject matter: hip-hop. Here is that dialog:

Amoeblog
: First up, how hard is it writing a book on a topic that is still unfolding around you as you report on its subject matter?

Marcus Reeves: Surprisingly, it wasn’t that hard to write because before I even started I had a beginning, a middle and an end. I’d already picked out who were the most influential rap artists—the ones who lead their particular era—strung their stories together by chapter and let the narrative unfold.Marcus Reeve's book "Somebody Scream!" And the narrative was easy because, like so many who’d watched the story of commercial rap over the last 30 years, it was also the story of my life. All the history and events that the music reflected, and I talk about in the book, were things I lived through and impacted my life. The last chapter of the book, which discusses what events shape the music now, helped capture all those moments that were still unfolding.

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