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Music History Monday: March 16

Posted by Jeff Harris, March 16, 2015 11:24am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Remembering Motown vocal legend Tammi Terrell (born Thomasina Winifred Montgomery in Philadelphia, PA) - April 29, 1945 - March 16, 1970.
 


On this day in music history: March 16, 1955 - "Unchained Melody" by Roy Hamilton is released. Written by Alex North and Hy Zaret, it is the second chart-topping for the R&B vocal legend from Leesburg, GA. Written by film score composer North (A Streetcar Named Desire, Spartacus) and lyricist Zaret ("One Meatball," "Why Does The Sun Shine?"), the song is originally composed as the theme for the film Unchained. It will quickly become a hit and is covered by numerous artists, including Al Hibbler and Les Baxter who will reach the top 10 with their versions. Hamilton's version (the third recording of the song) will spend three weeks at number one on the Billboard Rhythm & Blues singles chart and number six on the Best Sellers chart. It is Hamilton's vocal style and arrangement that is the one will most directly influence and inspire The Righteous Brothers' 1965 recording, which will become the most famous rendition of the song.
 

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New Life for Oakland's Continental Club

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 5, 2015 06:03pm | Post a Comment

Continental Club, OaklandBy Brent James

Nestled inconspicuously on 12th Street in West Oakland in a neighborhood known as Prescott (or the “Lower Bottoms” to the longtime residents of the area) is a quaint little building that you will probably miss if you blink. A structure of brick and hardwood and matted red carpets that haven’t been touched since the 1960s, the building standing at 1658 12th Street is the Continental Club – a once a mighty Jazz and Blues supper joint that helped Oakland and the East Bay Area garner the reputation of being the “Motown of the West.” Along with Slim Jenkins’ Supper Club, Esther’s Orbit Room, and dozens of other nightclubs that sprawled along 7th Street, the stages in these rooms once hosted the likes of Jackie Wilson, Aretha Franklin, Lou Rawls, Etta James, Otis Redding, Marvin Gaye, Ike and Tina Turner, and even Jimi Hendrix. The list goes on and the stories are endless if you’re lucky enough to get some face time with the “old timers” of the area. In this neighborhood, people still say “good morning” and spend many a Summer night on their porches, so that’s pretty easy to do.

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Music History Monday: December 15

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 15, 2014 10:46am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: December 15, 1967The Who Sell Out, the third studio album by The Who, is released. Produced by Kit Lambert, it is recorded at Talentmasters Studios in New York City; IBC Studios, Pye Studios, De Lane Lea Studios, CBS Studios, and Kingsway Studios in London; and Gold Star Studios in Los Angeles from May - November of 1967. The band's third release is a concept album that includes songs interspersed with fake commercials and public service announcements, mimicking the British pirate radio station Radio London. The band will actually be sued by a number of companies whose real products are parodied on the album. It will spin off the classic "I Can See For Miles" (#10 UK, #9 US Pop). Original pressings of the album include a short instrumental cut in the runout groove. The first 1,000 copies of the original stereo and first 500 mono copies of the UK LP will come packaged with a psychedelic poster of a butterfly painted by artist Adrian George. The art had originally been intended for the album's cover, but is rejected. The rarity of these initial pressings have sold in recent years for more than $1,000 each or more on the collector's market. The album is reissued on CD in 1995 with ten additional bonus tracks including outtakes not included in the original release. It is reissued again in 2009 as a two CD Deluxe Edition featuring the original mono and stereo versions of the album, with 28 bonus tracks.The Who Sell Out will peak at number 13 on the UK album chart and number f48 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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10 Albums to Pick Up for Valentine's Day

Posted by Billy Gil, February 7, 2014 05:21pm | Post a Comment

Hey you! Valentine’s Day is just around the corner. Like it’s next week. We’ll leave the chocolates and stuff to you, but we’ve got your music covered. Pick up any of these releases to help you seal the deal. Or to just enjoy quietly on your own with some white wine. That sounds great, actually.

Tina TurnerLove Songs

tina turner love songs amoebaThis compilation CD was just released and features some of Turner’s best songs, focusing on her comeback from 1983’s Private Dancer and on. Songs include a cover of Al Green’s “Let’s Stay Together,” “What’s Love Got to Do With It,” “The Best” and more.

 

 

SadeThe Ultimate Collection

sade the ultimate collectionI mean, c’mon, duh. You can’t go wrong with any Sade album, but this readily available collection has all the hits, including later period songs like “Soldier of Love.”

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Music History Monday: October 28

Posted by Jeff Harris, October 28, 2013 12:12pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: October 28, 1964 - The T.A.M.I. Show (Teen Age Music International) is filmed in Santa Monica. Produced by Bill Sargeant and directed by Steve Binder (Elvis '68 Comeback Special), it is filmed over two days (October 28 - 29, 1964) at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. The concerts feature performances by The Barbarians, The Beach Boys, Chuck Berry, Marvin Gaye, The Supremes, Lesley Gore, Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, Gerry & The Pacemakers, and The Rolling Stones. The unquestionable highlight of the film is a showstopping performance by James Brown & The Famous Flames. Shot with Electronovision television cameras (a early predecessor to high definition television), the best footage from the two nights will be edited into the final film, which is released theatrically on December 29, 1964. The T.A.M.I. Show will be seen as a seminal event in Rock & Roll history, which will be further confirmed when it is named to The National Film Registry by the U.S. Library Of Congress in 2006. Rarely seen in complete form since its original release (with the exception of video tape bootlegs), Dick Clark Productions will acquire the rights to the film. After numerous delays, it will finally be restored and released in its entirety on DVD by Shout Factory in March of 2010.
 

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