Amoeblog

Gorge on Tacos on Sunday, June 23rd at Tacolandia!

Posted by Billy Gil, June 5, 2013 06:12pm | Post a Comment

la weekly On Sunday, June 23, LA Weekly invites Angelenos to come out for Tacolandia, their first annual celebration of our city’s favorite food, at the Hollywood Palladium parking lot from 12-5 p.m.

mariachi los reyes
Amoeba's Prize Wheel

Amoeba is a proud sponsor of the event, and we will be on hand with free swag and our prize wheel — come by and give it a spin to win Amoeba swag and Amoeba gift certificates, as well as concert tickets and promo prizes.

Tickets are $20 for general admission, which includes sampling from more than 30 food providers, and $40 for VIP, which also gets you unlimited beverages. Get your tickets here.

The fest includes a selection of taco crafters from Los Angeles, Orange County and even some from Baja, Mexico, as curated by renowned food blogger Bill Esparza. In addition, there’ll be music, a tequila garden and more.

Food providers include Cacao Mexicatessen, Cafecito Organico, Loteria Grill, Mariscos Jaliscos, Mo-chica and more; see a full list of who will be on hand here. Music will be provided by Mariachi Los Reyes.

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Video: Mariachi El Bronx Live at Amoeba

Posted by Billy Gil, May 17, 2012 06:09pm | Post a Comment
Mariachi El Bronx stopped by Amoeba Hollywood to play their uniquely American take on traditional Mariachi music. Bedecked in black mariachi garb and with horns in tow, the band played a set of tracks from their 2011 album Mariachi El Bronx II.

Mariachi El Bronx started as post-hardcore band The Bronx before incorporating mariachi elements for this side project, which began when the band was asked to do an acoustic version of the song “Dirty Leaves” from The Bronx’s self-titled second album for a television show and they turned it into a mariachi dirge.

“We never wanted The Bronx to be a soft, quiet band,” says frontman Matt Caughthran, “but this freed up a whole new realm. Sometimes you don’t realize the barriers around yourself until you step outside them. It was a big moment in our career, breathing new life into the band.”



Band members Caughthran, Joby J. Ford (guitar), Jorma Vik (drums) Brad Magers (trumpet), Ken Horne (jarana/guitar), and Vincent Hidalgo (guitarrĂ³n) then studied up on YouTube, no less, while touring with The Bronx to make Mariachi El Bronx happen. Learning all the mariachi styles, such as norteno, jorocho, juasteka, bolero, and corridos was essential.

“Mariachi has rules,” Caughthran says. “We learned everything we could out of respect, especially as we’re a bunch of white guys — well, except for Ken, who’s Japanese.”

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Western Music - Kind of a Latino Thing - Happy Hispanic Heritage Month

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 4, 2011 04:46pm | Post a Comment

Gene Autry and Lois Wile in the Singing Cowboy 1936

I love Western music. Not "Western music" as in "music rooted in European traditions," but rather the "Western" of "Country & Western." Cowboy Music. In many ways, Country and Western is an odd pairing. The two genres seem to be at complete odds. Sure, the performers evince a similar sartorial sensibility, but the subject matter of Western music is about hard-working buckeroos following honor and dogies out under the wide open sky.

Country karaoke

Country, which I love too, is quite the opposite. Country celebrates the sedentary life - working and dying in the same small town, farm, or trailer court in which you were born -- and to hell with ethical codes of conduct; get drunk, cheat on your wife, and show up for your crappy job hungover.


Musically speaking, they're only distant cousins - no more closely related than Bluegrass and Jazz, House and Rap, Rock 'n' Roll and the Blues  -- but of those examples, only Country & Western get so invariably lumped together as a single genre that people usually omit the "Western" altogether.

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Boyle Heights

Posted by Eric Brightwell, January 28, 2010 09:11pm | Post a Comment
Boyle Heights

This neighborhood blog is about Boyle Heights. To vote for more Los Angeles neighborhoods, go here. To vote for Los Angeles County communities, vote here. To vote for Orange County neighborhoods, vote here.

Boyle Heights 1877

The area now known as Boyle Heights was originally inhabited by the Tongva, who lived there for centuries until their displacement by the Spaniards. When the area was still part of Mexico, it was known as Paredón Blanco. Prominent families in Paredón Blanco included the Lopez and Rubio households.