Amoeblog

Music History Monday: July 1

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 1, 2013 11:19am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 1, 1945 - Singer and songwriter Debbie Harry of Blondie (born Deborah Ann Harry in Miami, FL). Happy 68th Birthday, Debbie!
 

Born on this day: July 1, 1951 - The B-52's lead singer and songwriter Fred Schneider (born Frederick William Schneider III in Newark, NJ). Happy 62nd Birthday, Fred!
 


Born on this day: July 1, 1960 - R&B vocal legend Evelyn "Champagne" King (born in the Bronx, NY). Happy 53rd Birthday, Evelyn! (See pictures from Evelyn's in-store at Amoeba SF!)
 

Born on this day: July 1, 1971 - Singer/rapper/songwriter and producer Missy Elliott (born Melissa Arnette Elliott in Portsmouth, VA). Happy 42nd Birthday, Missy!!
 

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Music History Monday: June 3

Posted by Jeff Harris, June 3, 2013 03:10pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: June 3, 1950 - Singer and songwriter Deniece Williams (born June Deniece Chandler in Gary, IN). Happy 63rd Birthday, Niecy!
 



Born on this day: June 3, 1942 - Singer, songwriter, and musician Curtis Mayfield (born Curtis Lee Mayfield in Chicago, IL). Happy Birthday to this R&B icon on what would have been his 71st Birthday. We love and miss you, Curtis!!

 


On this day in music history: June 3, 1972Obscured By Clouds, the seventh studio album by Pink Floyd is released. Produced by Pink Floyd, it is recorded at the Chateau d'Herouville, Herouville in Ile-de-France in February and March of 1972. The album features music (six tracks with vocals and four instrumentals) from the soundtrack of director Barbet Schroeder's film La Vallee (The Valley). It is the band's second collaboration with the French film director, having composed the music for his 1969 film More. Pink Floyd will record Clouds just prior to the sessions for their next studio album, The Dark Side Of The Moon, at Abbey Road Studios in London beginning in June. Working under a tight schedule, the band will complete recording of their film score in just two weeks of studio time, following Schroeder's rough cut of the film to create specific music cues and interludes. The albums' enigmatic cover art (designed by regular graphic collaborators Hipgnosis) features a deeply out of focus photo of a man sitting in a tree. Obscured By Clouds will peak at #6 on the UK album chart, #46 on the Billboard Top 200, and will be certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: August 27

Posted by Jeff Harris, August 27, 2012 05:20pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Remembering blues guitar great Stevie Ray Vaughan, October 3, 1954 - August 27, 1990.


On this day in music history: August 27, 1966
- "Blowin’ In The Wind" by Stevie Wonder hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for one week, also peaking at #9 on the Hot 100 on September 3rd. Written by Bob Dylan, Wonder records his cover version after receiving many requests from fans who have heard him perform the song in his live show. Stevie’s producer Clarence Paul will sing co-lead vocals on the track. The song originally appears on Stevie Wonder’s 1966 album Uptight. “Blowin’ In The Wind” will be the then 16-year-old Motown stars’ third R&B chart topper and third top 10 pop single.


On this day in music history: August 27, 1967I Was Made To Love Her, the seventh album by Stevie Wonder is released. Produced by Henry Cosby and Clarence Paul, it is recorded at Motown Studio A in Detroit from late 1966 to mid 1967. Titled after his recent R&B chart topper and top five pop hit, the album features covers of Ray Charles' "A Fool For You" and James Brown's "Please, Please, Please," as well as several Motown standards such as "My Girl" and "Can I Get A Witness." I Was Made To Love Her will peak at #7 on the Billboard R&B album chart and #45 on the Top 200.

Music History Monday: June 25

Posted by Jeff Harris, June 25, 2012 04:05pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com

Remembering "The King Of Pop" Michael Jackson (August 29, 1958 - June 25, 2009).
Three years after you transcended, your joyous spirit and the incredible musical legacy has only grown stronger. It is apparent on the faces of anyone that has been touched by the sound of your voice or awestruck by the way you could dance. I will be eternally grateful for the way you've inspired me and so many others. Thank you, Michael. - JMH


Another Michael Jackson classic in tribute to the King of Pop. "It's Great To Be Here" was a track from The Jackson 5's fifth album, Maybe Tomorrow, released in April of 1971. In 2002, DJ Kenny Dope was given a copy of the original 8-track multi-track master to produce this excellent remix. No additional overdubs or instrumentation were added. This version was mixed from elements existing on the original master tape.


Born on this day: June 25, 1963 - Pop singer/songwriter/producer George Michael (born Georgios Kyriacos Panayiotou in East Finchley, North London, UK). Happy 49th birthday to this pop music legend!

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More Funky Than Too Funky? (supermodels, shock and a new movie from Katsuhito Ishii)

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, October 9, 2008 07:30pm | Post a Comment
Thierry Mugler's motorbike dress in George Michael's Too Funky music video 
I'll never forget the first time I witnessed the awesome spectacle of George Michael's "Too Funky" video. I was already borderline obsessed with fashion in the mid-1990's and thought highly of Michael's supermodel-laden "Freedom 90" video, but the visual candy of "Too Funky" as designed, styled and directed by then notorious fashion designer Thierry Mugler made the voyeuristic appeal and "freeing" acts of destruction that comprise the "Freedom 90" video seem trite by comparison. I don't care how precious and pretty Linda Evangelista looked as she lip synched inside her sweater, I'd rather see her (along with Christy Turlington, Tyra Banks, Eva Herzgovina and, my favorite, Nadja Auermann, to name a few) strutting her actual supermodel stuff on an actual catwalk, flaunting actual fashion while George Michael repeats, "everybody wants a lover like that," which is precisely what the "Too Funky" music video delivers, and in such a fabulous manner that it cannot possibly be copied -- sorry En Vogue.

So, how about that "Motorbike" dress? Pretty amazing isn't it? Certainly not for everyday wear, but a girl's gotta have options. I remember thinking this playful ensemble shocking, in a good way. Actually, after having just viewed the 'director's cut' of the "Too Funky" video, I got to thinking about what the definition of shocking was a little over ten years ago as far as the mainstream media is concerned. Of course, I got to thinking about everything Madonna: her "Lucky Star" midriff beginnings, her metal-bound Sex book, Erotica, the "Justify My Love" video and a particular scene from her Blonde Ambition tour documentary Madonna - Truth or Dare where Madge is informed by Canadian police that she'll be arrested if she touches herself suggestively during her performance of "Like A Virgin." With Madonna the list goes on and on, but if one were to judge her overall shock value by the percentage of the audience that sings along to her tune, counting both lovers and haters alike, I bet there wouldn't be any shocking findings at all, at any point in her career. Perhaps she really has done it all. And if that be the case, what in the world can be deemed shocking today? For my part, I'd like to submit Katsuhito Ishii's film Funky Forest: the First Contact (two disc DVD now out from Viz Media) for review, as it's the most shocking thing I've seen recently.
Asano Tadanobu and Susumu Terajima in Katsuhito Ishii's Funky Forest
So far, I love all the Ishii films I've been able to lock my sights on: Sharkskin Man and the Peach Hip Girl, Party 7, Taste of Tea -- I love them so much I cannot pick a favorite; they're like candy. One of the main reasons I felt shock when I watched Funky Forest for the first time is that it fulfilled all my expectations while successfully deflating them at the same time. It's like when someone decides to give you a 'sexy' cake for your birthday. Of course you didn't expect to get a cake shaped like giant genitals, but you did expect cake and there is no question about whether or not you're gonna eat it. But is it tasty? Funky Forest is a tasty cake of a movie diguised as disjointed, patchwork quilt handstiched by your reclusive little Edie Beale looking, ex-showgirl aunt who happens to moonlight as a Chris Cunningham mutant who watches too much TV Carnage. Threads of several stories are woven loosely with only a few coinciding; however, belly laughs and nervous giggles abound as situations break off, start up and proceed to get weirder and weirder. It's unlike any of his previous films; it's certainly funky and totally fun.

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