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Fantasy March: Campaigning for Genre Awareness

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, March 10, 2014 02:20pm | Post a Comment
amoeba music san francisco fantasy film cinema movie endcap trend trendcap magic knights wizards princess damsel fairy tale legend dungeons dragons game of thrones warfaring strangers darkscorch canticlesbootleg movie poster conan the destroyer ghana africa arnold grace jones fantasy magic comic book hero film adaptation

This month at Amoeba SF we're forging a fellowship for Fantasy genre awareness and appreciation! Given the recent release of Numero Group's most excellent "one comp. to rule them all" collection of Dungeons & Dragons inspired pre-Heavy Metal underground Rock, Warfaring Strangers: Darkscorch Canticles, and the impending Game of Thrones hype-a-thon building up to the premiere of the HBO show's fourth season on April 6th, we figured the month of March could do for a heady dose of Ice and Fire-fueled cinematic dream-fasting -- a visual poultice with which the reality-weary may allay their workaday woes, watching. Do keep an vigilant eye out for our Fantasy endcap at Amoeba SF featuring golden genre gems like these from the nineteen-eighties:
 

dragonslayer fantasy film 1981

Dragonslayer (1981) in which a young wizard's apprentice (Peter MacNichol of Ally McBeal and Ghostbusters 2 fame) must kill a virgin-snacking dragon to save the King's daughter who has been chosen by the kingdom's lottery system as the next sacrifice in line to keep the beast's appetite for destruction at bay.

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Nothing But a Man, a Film Review by Aiah Samba

Posted by Amoebite, January 27, 2014 12:10pm | Post a Comment

"They don't sound human, do they?" - Duff Anderson

When I was a kid, movies took up a big slice of my daily routine. I was an introverted introvert with nary a friend to call my own. Pop's wasn't around so that left my mom, sister and our RCA television to raise me. I was devouring movies at such an alarming rate my mother began to worry. But that's what mothers do; they worry about their children - especially African mothers. (How will she ever get a grandchild from someone who prays to a TV set?) By the time I was seventeen, I was a self-proclaimed film buff. (Not like I had anything else going for me.) I openly mocked peers with my cinema prowess, brandishing pithy one-liners and pop culture references to put them in their place. But one of those underlings asked an interesting question: "What was my favorite film on African American life?" It made me ponder how much Black cinema I've actually seen. The answer startled me. Now, outside of John Singleton, the Hughes Brothers, some Blaxploitation movies and the occasional Spike Lee joint, there weren't that many I was exposed to. I blamed it on the fact that compared to others, African American movies were far and few between. Heck, I saw more movies from Alfred Hitchcock than all the directors I named above combined. But that was lazy and actually quite inaccurate. There was plenty of gold to be had. So I started to dig. 

Nothing But a Man

Nothing But A Man was one of those gems I discovered. Now this may come off as hyperbolical fluff but I honestly believe this is not only one of the best films on African American life, but American life, period. I never liked the distinction between the two anyway. It's rare to see a film on this subject handled with such tact and elegance - a quiet, sensitive piece with the delicacy and finesse of a Swiss watch.

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Filmmaker Richard Kelly + Lost Highway at Arclight Hollywood Jan. 9

Posted by Amoebite, January 6, 2014 05:37pm | Post a Comment

Our neighbor at Arclight Cinemas Hollywood is the new home for The Modern School of Film series featuring guests from film (and beyond) discussing their favorite films. The first event is Thursday, January 9, at 7:30pm with filmmaker/writer Richard Kelly (Donnie Darko, Southland Tales) hosting a screening of David Lynch's neo-noir masterpiece Lost Highway. After the film, MSF founder Robert Milazzo will talk with Kelley about the movie and its influence.

Reserve tickets for the Richard Kelly + Lost Highway event here. Tickets for Modern School of Film Events are $18 for the general public and ArcLight Members receive $1 off each ticket. 

Lost Highway + Richard Kelley



 

Upcoming events in the series:

January 31: Kris Kristofferson & The Grapes of Wrath

February 7: Alanis Morissette and Bridesmaids

View full schedule here.

Noir City 12 Goes International in San Francisco: 1/24 - 2/2

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 23, 2013 06:18pm | Post a Comment

The Film Noir Foundation's yearly festival Noir City returns to the historic Castro Theatre January 24 - noir city san franciscoFebruary 2, 2014. The 12th edition of the world's most popular film noir festival is going international, exploding the long-held belief that noir stories and style are a specifically American phenomenon.

"Our desire to expand the scope of the festival has resulted in our most ambitious program ever," says festival impresario and host Eddie Muller. "Its overall impact will, I suspect, change many people's long-standing ethnocentric preconceptions about film noir."

Focusing on the years immediately following World War II, the festival features classic noir films from France, Mexico, Japan, Argentina, Germany, Spain, Norway, and Britain, as well as a complementary sampling of homegrown Hollywood flicks. The 27 films in the series will conclusively prove that the cinematic movement known as "Noir" spanned the globe, and its style, sexiness, and cynicism crossed all international borders. Check out the full schedule HERE!

Get your tickets now and know that you are supporting a great cause; the dollars you spend at the festival go towards the Film Noir Foundation's year-round restoration efforts.

Stone Roses Profiled in New Doc

Posted by Billy Gil, October 23, 2013 06:24pm | Post a Comment

the stone rosesThe Stone Roses were one of the best and most beloved Britpop bands of the early ’90s, helping the dance-influenced Madchester sound of the late ’80s and early ’90s take the British charts by storm with their classic self-titled debut album. In the U.S. their immediate impact was smaller, yet their influence stretched from predecessors like Oasis to more recent bands including Jagwar Ma and Diiv. Their sound, a blend of jangly guitars not unlike those employed by Johnny Marr in The Smiths with dancier beats and psychedelic effects, helped make them NME cover stars at the time, as did the presence of cocky, charismatic frontman Ian Brown, who once declared the band would become “the biggest band ever.” The band's second album failed to take off, and the band broke up in 1996. They reunited in 2012, after 16 years, to headline the Coachella Music and Arts Festival and have even garnered the Twitter ire of one Azealia Banks, as sure a sign as any that the band’s relevance continues today.

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