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Music History Monday: July 21

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 21, 2014 07:25am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 21, 1948 - Singer, songwriter, musician, and humanitarian Yusuf Islam (aka Cat Stevens, born Steven Demetre Georgiou in Marylebone, London, UK.). Happy 66th birthday, Yusuf/Cat!
 


On this day in music history: July 21, 1972The Slider, the seventh album by T. Rex is released. Produced by Tony Visconti, it is recorded at Rosenberg Studios in Copenhagen, Denmark; Château d'Hérouville in Paris, France; and Elektra Studios in Los Angeles from March - April 1972. Issued as the follow up to band's glam classic Electric Warrior, Marc Bolan and the band will begin recording at the Château d'Hérouville outside of Paris on the recommendation of his friend Elton John, while on tax exile from the UK. The basic tracks will be completed in only five days, before moving on to other studios in Denmark and the US to complete the overdubs and mixing. The album will spin off the hit singles "Metal Guru" and Telegram Sam." The album's iconic cover photo is taken by producer Tony Visconti (though on the original album cover it is erroneously credited to Ringo Starr who at the time is directing a concert film featuring Bolan and T. Rex titled "Born To Boogie"). The Slider will peak at number four on the UK album chart and number 17n on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: December 21

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 23, 2013 09:29am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: December 23, 1947 - Bell Laboratories scientists John Bardeen, Walter Bell LaboratoriesBrattain, and William Shockley will conclude experiments they had begun five weeks earlier that will result in the development of the bi-polar contact transistor. The trio will discover that by applying two gold contacts to a crystal of germanium, that it will will produce greater output power than its input. Their discovery will become the one of the cornerstones in the development of modern electronics (transistor radios, computers, calculators, etc...), and is regarded as one of the most important inventions of the 20th century. Texas Instruments will be the first company to produce the silicon transistor in 1954. Bardeen, Brattain, and Shockley will be awarded the Nobel Prize for their discovery in 1956.

 

 

On this day in music history: December 23, 1959 - Musician Chuck Berry is arrested in St. Louis, MO on charges check berry transporting a minor across state lines for "immoral purposes." At the height of his popularity at the time, the arrest of the rock & roll pioneer stems from his association with Janice Norine Escalanti, a 14-year-old bar waitress he meets in Juarez, Mexico. Berry will offer Escalanti a job working as a hat check girl at his Bandstand nightclub in St. Louis. When she is fired two weeks later, the girl will allege Berry attempted to have sexual intercourse with her. Police will arrest the musician for violation of the Mann Act (first known as the United States White-Slave Traffic Act of 1910), a vaguely worded piece of federal legislation meant to crack down on organized prostitution. The Mann Act will be used to claim that Berry has transported Escalanti "across state lines for immoral purposes." Following his arrest, Berry is fined $5,000, and after a two-week trial by an all male, all white jury, is sentenced to five years in federal prison. However, the initial sentence is turned over on appeal on the grounds that his original trial was heavily biased and racist. A new trial is ordered by the Federal Appeals Court in October of 1960, with Chuck Berry being convicted in 1961 after his second appeal fails. He will spend twenty months in federal prison from February 1962 to October 1963.

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(In which we lose our cool.)

Posted by Job O Brother, September 13, 2011 10:58am | Post a Comment
suicide is painless
My idea of a romantic comedy!

Last night I had the pleasure of introducing the boyfriend to the 1971 film Harold & Maude. How he managed to make it to age thirtysomething without ever seeing it sooner shows an utter lack of regard from his friends and family, and we can only praise Allah that I showed up in his life.

Oddly enough, we seem devoted to cinema circa ’71 this week, as the films featured in our fetching living room all hail from that year. Before Harold & Maude was The Andromeda Strain, a movie which may well be the most boring sci-fi thriller ever to be shot, but was so beautiful we couldn’t stop looking. Oh, so boring! Imagine the longest, highest budget, fantastically designed instructional video ever, or if Stanley Kubrick had decided to make 2001: A Space Odyssey without all that pesky meaning.



Before that was Ciao! Manhattan, the enigmatic art film that accidentally became a biographical piece on tragic, subculture superstar, Edie Sedgwick. I hesitate to comment further on this particular work, because it presently consumes me in my career and I’m sure I’ll be devoting an entire blog to it someday soon. But if you’re a fan of all-things-touching Warhol’s Factory, the film is a must-see. Or if you just want to see a lot of full frontal nudity from a former Vogue model who’d recently gotten a boob job, there’s that.

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Tuesday's Dead: Cat Stevens

Posted by Miss Ess, October 22, 2009 11:43am | Post a Comment
cat stevens

I hate to admit a commercial's had an affect on me, but "suddenly" I find myself in the mood to listen to some Cat Stevens. The fact that something that's blatantly created merely to sell something to me is backed by a song by one of the more anti-capitalism, anti-authority, anti-everything artists ever to play music is quite twisted. The irony is not lost on me, nor any of Cat's fans I am sure.cat stevens

Nonetheless, so many of my earliest memories are of listening to his music on the record player at my childhood home or on long car trips with my family. It provides a feeling of comfort to me. He's one of the artists whose impact is indelibly carved into my psyche; my connection to his music was formed practically in the womb. Maybe it sounds weird to say, but his songs effected me deeply and taught me some important things about how to both contemplate and live life even in a time before I'd either lived much or had much to contemplate. They also taught me about what great music can have at its best: integrity, melody, message, rhythm, compassion.

Later in life I reached for Cat right after September 11, I remember. It's funny, the universality of the lyrics is as interesting to me as it ever was, even when I was a small child considering, "If I ever lose my mouth, all my teeth, north and south..." Quite a shocking thought to a kid! He's very much the talented, if a bit overly serious, song writer. Not that we've all forgotten this, it's just sometimes maybe a "reminder" in the form of a horrid bit of merchandising is at least good for something anyway...Even though it feels sorta shameful all around, the music still stands.

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Trees For The Equinox

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 20, 2009 12:15am | Post a Comment

Cat Stevens Buddha and the Chocolate Box reord labelsouthland record labelchuck ragan record label
al hurrican mr. saxophone hurricane record labeldesire tree record label
bill gather trio impact record labelbonnie koloc record labelcure never enough palm tree record label
polkas con ernesto guerra del valle record labelpablo cruise part of the game record labelgeroge winston windham hill record label standard design
jimmy buffett coconut telegraph record labelaviva record labellinda waterfall windham hill records alternate label design
hickoids toxic shock cactus desgn labelnew mex record label
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