Amoeblog

Complete with Excellent Soundtrack, HBO's True Detective Fills Void Left by Breaking Bad

Posted by Billyjam, February 16, 2014 09:54pm | Post a Comment

As it has for the past four weeks, tonight's installment of True Detectives, HBO's new excellent noir murder mystery set in the deep south starring Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey , will kick off, what is sure to be another nail-bitingly engaging episode, with its eerily moving opening main title theme song "Far From Any Road" by The Handsome Family (Carrot Top Recods). The track, which is available as a download from Amoeba.com, is not just an excellent song by itself but it has the distinction of being one of those perfectly chosen TV show theme songs. That's thanks to the show's music supervisor, musician T-Bone Burnett. For last week's crazy amped-up, adrenaline-fueled show (no spoilers here in case you are a latecomer to this TV series) that followed three slower-paced story-setting episodes, Burnett handpicked more excellent accompanying songs from a wide array of artists from blues to rap and rock, including Slim Harpo, Melvins, Bo Diddley, Boogie Down Productions, Primus, Wu-Tang Clan, and (Nick Cave's) Grinderman (the manic sounding "Honey Bee (Let's Fly To Mars)").

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Hip-Hop That Encourages A Healthy Diet

Posted by Billyjam, January 25, 2013 12:34pm | Post a Comment

Sam Stomach "80 Bites" (2013)

Rap may have a bad rap for being negative but there are lots of positive raps out there including ones about diet and healthy living: the latest of which is the song/video above - "80 Bites" by Sam Stomach in which the cartoon character encourages healthy eating habits while wisely suggesting limiting ones intake to the amount of bites on a daily basis. "80 Bites, 80 Bites, 80 Bites" repeats Sam in his advice rap on only eating 80 bites of food throughout the day, and thereby retraining your stomach container to return to its original size which in turn will lead to fewer cravings for food / calories. "Puff said it's all about the Benjamins. He was wrong. It's all about the bites my friend," raps Sam who disses most diets. However he instead encourages downloading the "80 Bites" App and signing up for the new diet (at a $50 membership no less!). So really the video/song is just an ad. But still it's coming from a good place and it got me thinking about hip-hop and healthy eating. Beyond movements like the kids oriented Healthy Hip-Hop organization and individuals like "The Hip-Hop Chef - Cooking Tyrone"  who cross-pollinate hip-hop with cooking and who endorses vegan diet and healthy cooking/living, there are numerous hip-hop tracks that rap about diet.

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For KRS-One's "What's In My Bag?" The Teacha Takes His DJ Son Shopping For Some Real Hip-Hop

Posted by Billyjam, March 20, 2011 04:24pm | Post a Comment
 KRS-One's "What's In My Bag?"

The KRS-One "What's In My Bag?" video above, filmed last summer in the hip-hop aisle at Amoeba Hollywood, opens with the hip-hop pioneer also known as The Teacha reading aloud the liner notes' shout-outs off the back of BDP's Edutainment album as his teenaged son (also named Kris Parker) listens intently and asks, sincerely puzzled, why was it then that his his dad gave special thanks to wack radio DJs (who he said fronted on BDP's previous album) and to then President George H. Bush. "I was being sarcastic and giving special thanks to people who just screwed up everything," explained his hip-hop icon dad, who throughout his active quarter of a century hip-hop career has never been at a loss for words.

This video segment was recorded about a week after KRS-One had done an instore reading of his book The Gospel of Hip Hop: First Instrument presented by KRS One for the Temple of Hip Hop (Powerhouse Books), at the LA Amoeba and right around the same time as his son's 18th birthday (August 9th). The primary goal of the Amoeba shopping trip was to get the younger Kris Parker set with some quality hip-hop music before joining his dad as his DJ for the then soon approaching Rock The Bells dates in LA, SF, and NYC. At the time not too many people were aware of KRS-One's son. In fact, most only knew of KRS's other, older (step) son Randy Hubbard Parker, who in 2007 was tragically found dead in his Atlanta apartment at age 23; he was reportedly the victim of an apparent suicide following a bout of severe depression.

Hip-Hop Rap Up 07:30:10: Amoeba Hollywood Top 5 with Marques, KRS-One Amoeba Instore Review, Shing02 Interview + Live Music Guide

Posted by Billyjam, July 30, 2010 03:40pm | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Hollywood Weekly Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 07:30:10

Big Boi OutKast
1) Rick Ross Teflon Don (Def Jam)

2) Eminem Recovery (Aftermath, Interscope, Shady)

3) Big Boi Sir Lucious Left Foot... The Son of Chico Dusty (Def Jam)

4) The Roots How I Got Over (Def Jam)

5) Drake Thank Me Later (Cash Money Records)

Special thanks to Marques at the Hollywood Amoeba Music store for this week's in-person Top Five Hip-Hop Chart (scroll down to see video clip) from the Sunset Blvd. store where I spent much of Wednesday and Thursday this week soaking in all the loveliness of being surrounded by so much music Damn but the huge, cavernous two-level Hollywood Amoeba is just so vast that you seriously need to pace yourself if you go shopping there. The hip-hop section alone, where I stumbled upon records and DVDs that I had never even seen before, is worth the trip.

Besides crate digging and talking music with a slew of impressively knowledgeable Hollywood Amoebites, I also had the honor of moderating Wednesday evening's Q&A session with The Teacha himself, Hip Hop KRS ONE + General Jefflegend KRS ONE, who, in support of his latest book, The Gospel of Hip Hop, came for an exclusive Amoeba Hollywood instore that involved him talking about his unique hip-hop history-meets- life- manual publication, and also responding to questions from myself and some Amoeba customers who had bought the KRS book. One such customer was General Jeff (pictured above with KRS) from the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council, who had a great question about homeless youth -- something that KRS, as a former homeless youth himself, enthusiastically responded to in enlightening detail.

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The Gospel of Hip Hop According to KRS ONE, Part VI -- Hip Hop as World's Savior, The Gospel & KRS in the Year 2040

Posted by Billyjam, July 28, 2010 09:00am | Post a Comment

At 6pm today (July 28th), KRS One (aka The Teacha & longtime ambassador of all things Hip Hop) will celebrate the publication of his in-depth book, The Gospel of Hip Hop: First Instrument presented by KRS One for the Temple of Hip Hop (Powerhouse Books), with a special Amoeba Music Hollywood appearance. Unlike most Amoeba instores, which tend to be music concerts followed by a meet and greet/CD signing, today's standing room only KRS  instore event, to be held in the SoCal store's cozy Jazz Room, will involve the veteran Hip Hop artist, activist, educator, author giving a lecture related to The Gospel of Hip Hop, taking some questions from the audience, and signing copies of his book. It is still possible to get in on today's special event. For full information & exact details click here. And if you are unable to attend today's event but would like to purchase a copy of the book online from Amoeba you can do so by clicking here. If you have any questions that you would like KRS to answer please write them in the comments below, and, as moderator of today's KRS lecture, I will do my best to have the man answer your question.

Today's KRS One Amoeblog is the sixth and final part in the series leading up to his instore and includes another audio excerpt from the recent Amoeblog exclusive KRS phone interview. After spending even a short time in the company of KRS you quickly realize that to say he does not take Hip Hop lightly is quite an understatement. The man lives and breathes it. His famous line, "rap is something you do, Hip Hop is something to live," are truly words that he lives by. In conversation he mentions Hip Hop continually and clearly never stops thinking about it and its ramifications. "I think Hip Hop is the savior of American KRS ONEsociety; Hip Hop itself brings cultures together because it gives people a chance to talk and to really see what the other guy is thinking and in a peaceful way," he told me when I asked about the real meaning of Hip Hop as a culture and a lifestyle.

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