Amoeblog

Back to the Future Marathon at the New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, May 28, 2009 12:03am | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!




Friday & Saturday
May 29 & 30


Back to
the Future Trilogy Marathon!


Actress Claudia Wells, Jennifer from the first film, will appear in person both nights to discuss the film!

All Tickets $10
One tickets admits you to all three films

Back to the Future 7:30pm

Back to the Future Part II 10:00pm

Back to the Future Part III 11:59pm


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036



Be sure to check out Claudia Wells' new website www.armaniwells.com, too!

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Beach Party 2009

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 27, 2009 10:07pm | Post a Comment
andy williams happy heart lp coverorquesta del recuerdo lp covernajee lp cover
We're expecting a heatwave, so here's a nice round of beach themed covers...
charlie barnet quartet jazz oasis lp coverrod mckuen seasons in the sunn II lp cover
romanovsky & phillips trouble in paradise lp coversandy owens ensemble montage lp covertma beach party 2000
a date with riverside lp coverjimmy buffett riddles in the sand lp covernat king cole those lazy hazy crazy days of summer
I know that the Jazz Oasis cover is supposed to be desert, but it looks like the Pismo Beach sand dunes to me.
trigo limpio lp covertammy wynette only lonely sometimes lp coveriguana the winds of alamar lp cover
los joao vamos a la playa lp coverhard rock hits lp coverthis is steve & eydie lp cover
Although I love the Date With Riverside cover above, the Enrique Jorrin LP below is my personal favorite of the bunch.
call of the midnight sun lp coverorquesta enriques jorrin lp covertornader hit it again lp cover

Asian-American Cinema Part IX - the 2000s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 27, 2009 04:00pm | Post a Comment
The ninth of a nine part series on Asian-Americans in front of and behind the camera

INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN-AMERICAN CINEMA


The first efforts to combat negative racial stereotypes of Asians and Asian-Americans in film began in the silent era, when a few empowered figures attempted to create an alternative Asian-American Silent Cinema. After their efforts faltered, Hollywood provided most cinematic images of Asians in the '30s, 40s, 50s, and '60s. With the birth of Asian-American theater, Asian-American cinema was revived in the 1970s and began to take off as a viable independent cinema in the 1980s. By the '90s, the scope of Asian-American Cinema broadened considerably, a trend that continued in the 2000s.

APAMERICA IN THE 2000s
In the 2000s, Asians became the fastest growing racial minority in the county. As of 2006, there were over thirteen million Americans of Asian descent (not counting Native people). Of the top ten languages spoken in American homes (English, Spanish, Chinese, French, German, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Korean, Italian and Russian), four are Asian.

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Glen Hansard of The Frames and The Swell Season Chats

Posted by Miss Ess, May 27, 2009 01:51pm | Post a Comment
Irishman Glen Hansard's band The Frames has been quietly (at least Stateside) putting out strong, earnest rock records since the early 90s. Everything changed in 2007, when an excellent, endearing low budget indie film called Once, starring Glen and Marketa Irglova and studded with songs written by the pair, exploded into the mainstream due to massive positive word of mouth buzz. Glen and Marketa were swept along all the way to the Oscars, where they performed one of the songs from the movie, "Falling Slowly." By the end of the night they had won the Academy Award for Best Original Song! Since then, Glen and Marketa have been touring relentlessly as The Swell Season and earning rave reviews across the globe for their performances. Their backing band is often The Frames! Glen was kind enough to chat with me about his inspirations, what he's recording now, Van Morrison, and, of course, the Oscar moment. Read on for the interview:

glen hansard once

Miss Ess: You were in the studio in Feb recording -- can you tell us a little more about what you were recording and how it's sounding? What's coming up next for you?


Glen: Yes -- we [Marketa and several Frames members] were in the studio in February and March and April and finally it's done. I'm in New York right now mastering the final sequence; I'm happy with it. I'll go back to Ireland for a few days after this, swell season at amoebathen [Marketa and I] go to Korea and Japan to follow up on a tour we did recently that went well, so they invited us back to do some follow up dates. After that I think I'll rent a place in New York for the summer before going back on tour proper in late August early September.

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Vinyl Confidential, 1.1 – the odd order of oblong boxes

Posted by Whitmore, May 26, 2009 08:34pm | Post a Comment

Why the record boxes? Why the art work? Why the hell don’t I write more about dumpster diving? Many questions are piling up here on the ol’ TV tray…
 
The theory goes: Disorder increases with record collecting because we measure collecting in the direction in which disorder increases.
 
Any theory is always provisional, in the sense that it is only a hypothesis: you can never prove it, no matter how long you may scream into somebody’s contrarian ear, or pound your fist into a table or a disagreeing face. And no matter how many times the results of experiments agree with some theory, you can never be sure that the next time around the result will not contradict your precious little theory. But as philosopher of science Karl Popper has emphasized, a good theory is characterized by the fact that it makes a number of predictions that could in principle be disproved or falsified by observation and survive.
 
For example, each time a new box of records with distinctive artwork is observed to agree with the predictions, like selling quickly, that’s a good thing. The theory, ‘art covered record boxes are cool', not only survived but found revival. Hallelujah and pass the collection plate! Our confidence is increased! But if a new box, covered in great artwork, is put out on the floor yet contains only random, scratched, dusty and chipped records, sprinkled with rat poop, the resulting observations may be a bit negative. We may feel obligated to abandon or modify the theory, even though this collection of records didn’t match the usual criteria. Nevertheless the theory of ‘artwork on record boxes’ is still solid. However, amending our assumptions is not out of the question, especially if we have to deal with irate customers and a significant berating by management. A slight re-adjustment in the theory might conclude that the art work is just the carrot, and yes, you can lead a record geek to water, but without any water in the 45 box to wash down that rat poop stuck in his throat … well, you know … anyway, next time around we should just toss those ruined, scratched records in the dumpster and note; disorder increases because we tend to measure in the direction in which disorder increases.

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