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Broadway 100 - Bringing Back Broadway's Centennial Events

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 2, 2011 03:00pm | Post a Comment

Los Angeles' Broadway


Los Angeles
' Broadway Theater and Commercial District in the downtown Historic Core is the oldest historic theater district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Million Dollar Theater, Roxie Theater, Los Angeles Theater, Loew's State Theatre, Globe Theater, Tower Theater, Rialto Theater, Orpheum Theater and United Artists Theaters were mixed movie and vaudeville theaters, dedicated movie palaces and nickelodeons that became movie theaters. With twelve of them within a six-block stretch of Broadway, it is also the only large concentration of picture palaces in the US and the largest historic theater district in the county.

 

Los Angeles' Broadway at the turn of the century

 

Broadway was originally named Fort Street when it was laid out in 1849. It was renamed Broadway in 1890 and runs from Lincoln Heights through Chinatown, the Civic Center, (Old) South Park, South Central, (New) South Park, Florence, Broadway-Manchester, Willowbrook, West Compton, to Carson where it ends. The twelve theaters were built between 1910 and 1931 with a combined filmgoing capacity of 15,000. At that time it was the entertainment hub of Los Angeles. After World War II, it began to decline as first-run moviegoers began to favor theaters in Hollywood and Westwood, and later, the suburbs. 

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Happy Birthday, Winsor McCay!

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 26, 2010 05:11pm | Post a Comment

Winsor McCay
Today is the birthday of artist, animator and vaudevillian Winsor McCay, who, were he still alive, would be 139 -- or 144 years old… more on that later. Like many animation pioneers,  McCay's work has been largely overshadowed by his better known successors, Walt Disney and the Fleischer Brothers. But if it weren't for McCay, who knows what they'd have done with their lives. 

 

 

Zenas Winsor McKay was born September 26th -- either in 1871 in Spring Lake, Michigan (according to McCay), or in 1869 in Canada (according to his tombstone), or 1867 in Canada (according to the census). What is not disputed is that he was the son of Robert McKay (later changed to McCay) and Janet Murray McKay. Robert worked variously as a teamster, grocer and real estate agent. They sent him to Cleary's Business College in Ypsilanti, Michigan. At Michigan State Normal College (now Eastern Michigan University), John Goodison (a former glass stainer) taught him the fundamentals of art. McCay moved to Chicago in 1889 with the intention of attending the Art Institute of Chicago. However, unable to afford tuition, he found a job at the National Printing and Engraving Company where he made circus and theatrical posters. In 1901, he moved to Cincinnati, where he worked as an artist for Kohl and Middleton's Vine Street Dime Museum and married Maude Leonore Dufour. Tales of the jungle imps by Felix Fiddle

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