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10 Releases to Look For on Record Store Day 2016

Posted by Billy Gil, March 30, 2016 10:43am | Post a Comment

10 releases to look for on record store day

Record Store Day is coming April 16, bringing loads of exclusive records to record stores around the country. You can see everything that’s coming to Amoeba here and everything we have in store for the day thus far here, including sales, DJs and more. Here are 10 releases we’re looking forward to picking up on RSD.

 

David Bowie The Man Who Sold The World [Picture Disc]

david bowie the man who sold the world picture disc record store dayDavid Bowie’s unfortunate passing has left us all with a thirst for all things Bowie. Some of his best-loved albums were recently re-released on vinyl, and the latest to get the reissue treatment is his third album. It’s best known for the title track, especially after being covered by Nirvana on their Unplugged LP, but The Man Who Sold the World represents a turning point in Bowie’s career as his music turned heavier and lyrics darker, setting an important precedent for goth rock, among other influences the album would have.

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5 Under-the-Radar Albums to Check Out in August

Posted by Billy Gil, August 4, 2014 05:53pm | Post a Comment

5 Under-the-Radar albums

We’ve told you about the heavy hitters to check out in late summer, but there are always exciting releases bubbling just beneath the surface that are worth your attention as well. Here are five to look out for:

Twin PeaksWild Onion

twin peaks wild onion lpOut Aug. 5

Not that “Twin Peaks.” This one’s a kickass power-pop band from Chicago whose sophomore LP is full of smart, lean songs with a lot of heart. One taste of a song like the two-minute “Flavor” and you might be hooked for life.

 

David Kilgour & The Heavy Eights - End Times Undone

david kilgour heavy eights lpOut Aug. 5

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David Lynch Releases New Self-Directed Video for "Crazy Clown Time"

Posted by Amoebite, April 6, 2012 12:44pm | Post a Comment
David LynchThis week David Lynch released his self-directed music video for "Crazy Clown Time," the title track from his first solo album. Lynch describes the setting for the video as “an intense psychotic backyard craziness, fueled by beer" which is a pretty perfect summation. With the mood set, Lynch's sing-speak twang provides the narration for the events unfolding in the video.

Crazy Clown Time, released in November 2011 on Play It Again Sam, was recorded over a period of several months at Lynch's personal studio near Mulholland Drive with engineer and collaborator Dean Hurley. As you might expect from the director of Erasherhead, Mulholland Drive and Twin Peaks,  his music - much like his video for "Crazy Clown Time" - is echoey, weird, repetitive, foreboding, hypnotic, and fascinating.


Watch David Lynch's video for his single "Crazy Clown Time":




Watch our interview with Mr. Lynch when he visited Amoeba Hollywood in 2008 for the release of David Lynch The Lime Green Set DVD box set:

(In which an angel visits Amoeba Music Hollywood.)

Posted by Job O Brother, July 13, 2009 02:33pm | Post a Comment
jimmy scott
Little Jimmy looking big

Uh, did I mention that, a couple weeks ago, Little Jimmy Scott came into the jazz room at Amoeba Music Hollywood? I used up a whole box of tissue, my mind was so blown – and I’m not easily star-struck. Most of the people I’d like to meet are dead (a quality I admire in a person). Never have I been as giddy and star-struck as I was at meeting Jimmy Scott. I cried. I actually cried! Like I was a seventeen-year-old girl at a Beatles concert in ’64. Okay, I didn’t grab the sides of my face and scream – not externally, anyway.

jazz singer

He was sweet like an angel descending on the city for a day to offer a glimpse of light unsoiled by our planet’s spiritual smog. His voice was unmistakable, his smile generous, and he patiently listened to all our gushing with the grace you’d expect from your favorite Kindergarten teacher. The fact that he was wheelchair-bound only enhanced the sense that he was visiting royalty, forever receiving people at his throne.

Poor health has made his already diminutive body more frail, and the stiffness in his hands made for an other-worldly contrast to his skin, which was soft and warm like a newborn infant.

He was flanked by a small film crew from Germany who were shooting a documentary on the making of his next album which, they reported, would be of the blues genre. They were excited that, in the employees of Amoeba, they finally found some young people who not only knew who Jimmy Scott was, but were fans. One of them bullied my fellow co-worker, Lucas, and I into being interviewed for their documentary, despite my emphatic explanation that I was too shy for interviews and anyway, English was my sixteenth language. (I acquiesced after they called my bluff and offered to allow me to answer questions in my native Ket.)

Your Pals Are Not What They Seem 2: Faith and Reason in Lost's Season 5 Finale

Posted by Charles Reece, May 30, 2009 02:07pm | Post a Comment
Page I

john lock weird eyes lostjohn locke dead coffin lost

Being a congenital skeptic, I had expected Lost to go the way of other fantasy shows exploring the issue of faith. It began by establishing the central antagonism between its central characters, the rationalist doctor Jack Shephard (the de facto leader -- get it?) and the faith-filled, ironically named John Locke (the namesake of the famous British empiricist whose philosophical inbred progeny was one B. F. Skinner). In regaining the use of his legs after crashing on the island, Locke was granted something of his own revelation. By way of this objective correlative, Locke and the audience had a inkling that there was something more to the island than Jack's skepticism allowed. Throw in a smoke monster, people coming back from the dead and time travel and any reasonable person starts sympathizing with Nochimson's vaginal heroism. The lure is there to wrap the antagonism up in the same generic package as all the aforementioned failed fantasy programs. Affirm faith by killing it with literalism (compare the deracinated horror of Stephen King's CGI-infested movie-adpatation of his The Shining to the dread of Stanley Kubrick's).

Seems to me that faith is both an opening and a closing. The believer must remain open to mysterious possibilities that defy the normative limits given by our best explanatory models while digging his heels in the sand and claiming his irrationally derived belief is the truth. Therefore, faith requires mystery. If the implausible is made normative, as it is so often in fantasy, there is no faith involved. Of course, the recipient (viewer, reader) must maintain a level of faith by way of the classic suspension of disbelief. Similarly, lest the believer become a mere ideologue, he must live with uncertainity, a nagging suspicion that he might be wrong (i.e., not all that different from the fantasy genre's suspension requirement).

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