Amoeblog

Farewell Blues Great Johnny Winter

Posted by Billyjam, July 17, 2014 08:21am | Post a Comment
        
Johnny Winter Live on Don Kirshner's Rock Concert in NYC 1974

The music world lost another great yesterday with the passing of Texas born blues guitarist/singer legend Johnny Winter who died (Wednesday, July 16) in Switzerland in his Zurich hotel room. He was 70 years of age. While no exact cause of death has so far been announced according to those close to the artist, who was considered among the greatest slide blues guitarist of all time, had not been in good health for a few years - yet still managed to get enough energy to do what he loved - perform the blues to appreciate audiences. The older brother of Edgar Winter with whom he began playing the blues from early in life, Johnny was not just a practitioner of the blues but also long an ambassador and champion of the genre as he supported the careers of such idols of his as John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters (see all three together in concert in video down below). In the 1977 Winter brought his hero Muddy Waters into the studio to record Hard Again for Blue Sky Records - the imprint distributed by Columbia specifically set up for the release - followed by two other Waters collaboration albums that would result in three Grammys for Waters.

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Tales of the Texas Rangers -- Police Procedural with a Lone Star Twist

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 8, 2013 12:42pm | Post a Comment

It took me a while to discover the brilliant radio drama, Tales of the Texas Rangers. I inferred from its name that it was a juvenile Western -- possibly a derivative of The Lone Ranger. Even though The Tales of the Texas Rangers Dell comicLone Ranger provided my childhood introduction I have never been a fan of white hat vs. black hat shoot 'em ups. The fact that the Ranger Reid and his taciturn buddy, Tonto, are once again galloping onto the screens of multiplexes does absolutely nothing for me besides lodging Gioachino Rossini's William Tell Overture into my head on a loop.




Luckily for me, Tales of the Texas Rangers is almost completely unlike The Lone Ranger beyond the fact that the protagonists of both are (or were, in the Lone Ranger's case) members of the Texas Rangers. Tales of the Texas Rangers isn't even a Western, really, any more than Bottle Rocket, Office Space, Pee-Wee's Big Adventure, or any other film that happens to be set in Texas of the present day. Tales of the Texas Rangers is actually a police procedural, having more in common with Dragnet and the similarly-technology-fetishizing CSI franchise than even radio noir adult westerns like Gunsmoke. Like Dragnet, the episodes were supposedly based on actual cases handled by the rangers from the late 1920s to the then present. Also like Dragnet, after the apprehension of the criminal, the announcer would state the outcome of the case -- usually a sentence at Huntsville in place of San Quentin.

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Short Documentary About Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Amoebite, November 30, 2011 06:36pm | Post a Comment
Dylan Neal, a student of the University of Texas Semester in LA Program, made a short documentary about Amoeba Hollywood as a submission for the 10 Under 10 Film Festival in Texas. The festival was created by Radio-Television-Film professor Ellen Spiro to feature short documentary and experimental films made by UT students. Here's the tricky part: the films must be under 10 minutes long and made for under $10.

The documentary was shot over several days in September and October 2011, and captures Amoeba moments like our in-store with Touareg band Tinariwen and our Halloween festivities, as well as interviews with staff and regular customers. I particularly loved Amoebite Cody in full costume (including face paint) being interviewed on camera with no reference to his appearance or explanation about it being Halloween. But, hey, you never know what you're going to find when you walk into Amoeba!

Amoeba Hollywood - 10 Under 10 Submission from Dylan Neal on Vimeo.

(Wherein I play with myself.)

Posted by Job O Brother, April 25, 2011 01:30pm | Post a Comment

vintage postcard

I’m a bachelor this week – so to speak. Emotionally I am in love and committed to the boyfriend, but as he is in the Great Country of Texas for the next week, I am functioning as single. As much as I miss him, I do get to indulge in certain activities I would otherwise not.

For starters, I can safely wear wife-beaters without incurring any catty remarks about my “smacking my girlfriend around” or needing to go out and “fix my bike”. I like to pair my wife-beaters with basketball shorts and hair un-brushed to the point where I look like a White Panther. A half-empty bottle of Bud Light would really complete the look, but I’m no fashion sheep.

bud light
On the runways of Paris this summer.

Speaking of alcohol, when alone I get to drink wine my most favorite way: straight from the bottle. It looks awful. It looks trashy, debaucherous, and to outside eyes would seem like a red flag signaling the starting race towards alcoholism – but I don’t drink any more from a bottle than I would a glass, plus this way I get so much more oxygen with each sip, thus facilitating a burst of flavor and heightening all the complexities and subtle nuances a bottle of Charles Shaw has to offer. Also, it’s one less glass to wash, which means it’s greener. Drinking wine straight from the bottle helps trees and future generations of children!

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Documenting the Already Forgotten: The Interview Project at davidlynch.com

Posted by Charles Reece, January 31, 2010 05:23pm | Post a Comment
The webcasts started back in June of last year, but I just heard about them. Directed by Austin Lynch and Jason S., a 100 so-normal-they're-surreal citizens of these United States are interviewed in situ by Angie Schmidt and Julie Pepin. The Interview Project covers 20,000 miles and selects potential subjects as "they're found." Each interview is about 2 minutes long and introduced by David Lynch (father to one of the directors):

 interview project david lynch

They go to places like Marfa, Texas:

interview project lynch marfa texas

Which is where No Country for Old Men was largely set. And they interview Texans like Doc Whitman:

interview project lynch doc whitman

Whose Steve Ditko-styled hands suggest a lifelong struggle against nature and industry:

interview project doc whitman hands   steve ditko hand

They, of course, meet other people from other places, too, if you're into that sort of thing:

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