Amoeblog

Music History Monday: September 16

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 16, 2013 11:55am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: September 16, 1963 - "She Loves You" by The Beatles is released in the US. Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, it is the band's third single to be released in the US. Lennon and McCartney will begin writing the song while The Beatles are touring the UK with fellow Liverpudlians Gerry & The Pacemakers and American star Roy Orbison in June of 1963. They will finish writing it over the next couple of days before recording it at Abbey Road Studios on July 1, 1963. The single's B-side, "I'll Get You," will also be recorded during the same session. The single is released by Philadelphia-based indie label Swan Records after it is offered to both Capitol and Vee Jay Records who both turn it down. At first, the single will receive only minimal exposure and fails to make the Billboard Hot 100. After the band breaks through with "I Want To Hold Your Hand" a few months later, Swan will reissue "She Loves You" in January of 1964 and it will re-enter the chart hitting #1 on the Hot 100 on March 21, 1964, becoming their second million-selling single in the US. Swan Records will also release the bands German language version of the song titled "Sie Liebt Dich" (recorded in Paris on January 29, 1964 during the same recording session for "Can't Buy Me Love" and the German version of "I Want To Hold Your Hand," titled "Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand") on May 21, 1964, following the chart topping success of the original version. However, it will sell poorly, peaking at #97 on the Hot 100 on June 27, 1964.
 

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Wild Beasts Trekking Through California

Posted by Billy Gil, October 11, 2011 05:49pm | Post a Comment
One of my favorite bands of the past few years has to be Wild Beasts. Captivatingly beautiful yet harrowingly strange, there just aren’t many bands around like Wild Beasts. If you haven’t heard them, think Talk Talk/Talking Heads style percussive yet atmospheric rock with the theatrical falsetto of singer Hayden Thorpe and intoning howl of bassist Tom Fleming booming and flooding over everything.
 
Their earliest stuff had a freewheeling quality that made it seem like they were daring you to turn it off or keep listening to find out where they’d go next. First single “Brave Bulging Buyoyant Clairvoyants” from Limbo, Panto starts as this bouncy guitar jam until you hear the weirdest voice ever, like razors on chalkboard — that would be Thorpe’s dandified growl. That song used to be like a litmus test for me to see how much people would be willing to hear something that kind of smacks you around a bit and can’t sit nicely in the background.


“We were kind of small town boys really,” Fleming says of their early days. “It’s a bit of naiveté. We just thought people would get it.”

Things changed for 2009’s Two Dancers, which saw the band rein in the ruckus and focus on grooves and tunefulness. People took notice — the formerly renegade and challenging band suddenly appeared on year-end lists aplenty and got the band nominated for a Mercury Prize.

“It didn’t change a thing in terms of the music we’re making,” Fleming says. “But when you’re heading people like Mark Ronson saying they like Wild Beasts, it’s like, what on earth? When did this happen?”

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Amoeba Hollywood Vinyl Insider -- Main Room Wall Overhaul

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, October 23, 2010 01:10pm | Post a Comment

It's a rare occasion when we change out the entire main room's wall item LPs, so head down & check out hundreds of new collectibles. Here's a small sampling of what you'll find...


James Yorkston's Year of the Leopard: a cheap and beautiful Folk-Rock stunner!

Posted by J. Mark Beaver, October 31, 2008 04:00pm | Post a Comment
james yorkston year of the leopard
Los Angeles is beautiful right now. The sky is almost completely blanketed with a thin layer of cloud, each cloud undercoated with gray as if it could start raining any moment. It won't, though. Not yet. We have a few weeks, maybe even a month before there's any significant rain, but still, this weather holds a promise that L.A. is moving out of its summer monotony of heat and dust. The wind is moving everything around, warm and round and humid, unlike the Santa Anas and their hot, lip-chapping blast. I'm ready. I want to have a good excuse to sit on the couch and watch a movie as the rain pours off the roof and through the huge oak in my front yard. I'm ready for a day that will welcome a centrepiece like James Yorkston's Year of the Leopard.

Yorkston plays a beautiful acoustic guitar and he writes a beautiful song. He kicked around Scotland and England for years in punk bands and the like, settling down to write the type of gorgeous tomes that Pete Paphides of The Times (London) called, “...songs that sound not so much written as carefully retrieved from your own subconscious, played with an intuition bordering on telepathy. " He's got a great, simultaneously warm and brittle voice that sometimes reminds of fellow Scot, David Gray. His songs are not too far afield from Gray's work, either, often underpinned by burbling electronics and synth washes that, surprisingly, never pull them out of the Brit-Folk context from which they emerge. Yorkston has toured with Beth Orton, David Gray, the Tindersticks, Turin Brakes, Lambchop after having come to many fans' attention through his opening slot on all 27 dates of John Martyn's 2001 tour.

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