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Music History Monday: March 3

Posted by Jeff Harris, March 3, 2014 10:00am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: March 3, 1972Music of My Mind, the fourteenth studio album by Stevie Wonder is released. Produced by Stevie Wonder, Bob Margouleff, and Malcolm Cecil, it is recorded Media Sound Studios and Electric Lady Studios in New York City, and Crystal Industries in Los Angeles from mid 1971 - early 1972. After recording for Motown since the age of 12, Stevie Wonder's contract with the label expires when he turns 21 years old on May 13, 1971. In spite of millions in record sales and earnings generated, he will find that there is only $1 million held in trust for him. Instead of renewing his contract with Motown, he'll move to New York and begin working with Bob Margouleff and Malcolm Cecil of Tonto's Expanding Head Band who will assist him in taking his music to the next level. Experimenting with synthesizers, Wonder will block book studio time and record for several months before re-emerging with a new sound and career direction. Having fielded several offers from rival record companies, he will re-sign with Motown Records but strictly on his own terms. He will negotiate a deal that gives him complete artistic control, his own music publishing company, and one of the highest royalty rates in the music business. Released as the first album under his new deal, Music of My Mind will be a major turning point for Stevie Wonder, beginning an era that will produce some of his most critically acclaimed and commercially successful work. Spinning off two singles including "Superwoman (Where Were You When I Needed You)" (#13 R&B, #33 Pop), and "Keep On Running" (#36 R&B, #90 Pop), Music Of My Mind will peak at #6 on the Billboard R&B album chart and #21 on the Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: January 6

Posted by Jeff Harris, January 6, 2014 09:50am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: January 6, 1957 - Elvis Presley will make his third and final appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show. Due to the previous controversy generated by his movement on stage, Presley will only be shot from the waist up. The singer will perform "Hound Dog," "Love Me Tender," "Heartbreak Hotel," "Don't Be Cruel," "Too Much," and "(There'll Be) Peace In The Valley (For Me)." The appearance is a huge success and will be seen by over sixty million people, generating the single largest viewing audience in television history at that time. Only two days after this show airs, Presley will receive notice from the Memphis draft board that he is to be drafted into the United States Army.
 


On this day in music history: January 6, 1958 - The Gibson Guitar Company registers its design for flying vthe Flying V guitar with the US Patent Office. The unique instrument is designed by Gibson president Ted McCarty with the intention of adding a futuristic aspect to the companies image. During their original manufacturing run, the guitar's body and neck are constructed from African Korina wood and mahogany with either ebony or rosewood fretboards. Guitarists such as Albert King and Lonnie Mack will adapt to them immediately and will become closely associated with both artists. However, initial sales will be slow and they will be discontinued in 1959. When guitarists like Jimi Hendrix and Dave Davies of The Kinks begin playing them, it will renew interest in the Flying V and Gibson will reintroduce the guitar in 1967. The instrument will become a favorite of hard rock and heavy metal musicians during the 1970s and '80s. Original Flying V's made in 1958 and 1959 today are valued at between $200,000 and $250,000. To this day, the Flying V remains one of Gibson's most popular guitars.

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WONDER-FULL SF X: 10 Years Celebrating the Wonder of Stevie this Saturday

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 5, 2013 03:16pm | Post a Comment

The annual Stevie Wonder tribute WONDER-Full SF starring DJ Spinna (NYC) celebrates its ten-year wonder-full stevie wonderanniversary in San Francisco on December 7th at Mezzanine.

WONDER-Full is a dance party of epic proportions dedicated to Stevie Wonder’s essential compositions, covers, and goodies. WONDER-Full debuted in San Francisco in 2003 and its ten-year run, Stevie fans from across the Bay Area and beyond have embraced the event with beautiful energy, diversity and love that has made WONDER-Full SF one of the most anticipated events of the year! 

One of the most sought after dance floor magicians DJ Spinna headlines with support from Hakobo (fresco), Proof (Massive Selector), and King Most (Society).

More details HERE! Advanced tickets have sold out, but tickets will be available at the door the night of the event.

Music History Monday: October 28

Posted by Jeff Harris, October 28, 2013 12:12pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: October 28, 1964 - The T.A.M.I. Show (Teen Age Music International) is filmed in Santa Monica. Produced by Bill Sargeant and directed by Steve Binder (Elvis '68 Comeback Special), it is filmed over two days (October 28 - 29, 1964) at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. The concerts feature performances by The Barbarians, The Beach Boys, Chuck Berry, Marvin Gaye, The Supremes, Lesley Gore, Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, Gerry & The Pacemakers, and The Rolling Stones. The unquestionable highlight of the film is a showstopping performance by James Brown & The Famous Flames. Shot with Electronovision television cameras (a early predecessor to high definition television), the best footage from the two nights will be edited into the final film, which is released theatrically on December 29, 1964. The T.A.M.I. Show will be seen as a seminal event in Rock & Roll history, which will be further confirmed when it is named to The National Film Registry by the U.S. Library Of Congress in 2006. Rarely seen in complete form since its original release (with the exception of video tape bootlegs), Dick Clark Productions will acquire the rights to the film. After numerous delays, it will finally be restored and released in its entirety on DVD by Shout Factory in March of 2010.
 

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Music History Monday: July 22

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 22, 2013 11:40am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: July 22, 1966Blue Breakers With Eric Clapton by John Mayall & The Blues Breakers is released. Produced by Mike Vernon, it is recorded at Decca Studios in West Hampstead, London in March of 1966. The album will initially be planned as a live recording, but the recordings are scrapped and the band will record in the studio instead. It will be released to great acclaim upon its release in the UK, further cementing Eric Clapton's reputation as a brilliant lead guitarist, and is regarded as one of the quintessential British blues recordings. Clapton will use his newly acquired (and now legendary) 1960 Les Paul during the sessions. The album's now famous cover photo features the band posed together looking at the camera, with Clapton eyes averted reading a "Beano" comic book. In 2006, Universal Music Group will release a 2 CD Deluxe Edition of the album featuring a remastered version of the original album with the original stereo and mono mixes, with the second disc featuring live recordings made for and originally broadcast on the BBC radio program Saturday Club Sessions as well as the stand alone single "Lonely Years" and its original B-side "Bernard Jenkins." Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton will peak at #6 on the UK album chart.
 

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