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Amoeba Berkeley & Record Store Day 2012: East Bay Loves Its Music!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 23, 2012 04:39pm | Post a Comment
Berkeley Amoeba Record Store Day

By Spensaur Cooper
Photos by Spensaur Cooper & Gene Bae 

The 5th Annual Record Store Day provided Amoeba Berkeley with a reminder that the East Bay loves itsBerkeley Amoeba Record Store Day music. An hour prior to open on that beautiful Saturday morning, folks had already created a line that passed Cafe Mediterranean, and for good reason too.

Record labels big and small released hundreds of titles specifically for Record Store Day this year. In Berkeley, we seemed to have more titles than we ever had before so instead of our normal corral set up, we provided a few different stations in the center of the store to accommodate the overflowing of new releases. Highlights from our shipments included The Flaming Lips and Heady Fwends LP, Phish's Junta Deluxe (Pollock Version) LP, Devo's Live in Seattle 1981 LP, Lee Hazlewood's The LHI Years LP, The Pharcyde's Bizzarre Ride II, as well as countless others.

As the line from outside poured into our RSD aisles, things got hectic but customers worked together, Berkeley Amoeba Record Store Day handing albums to others who could not reach and looking out for their fellow record enthusiasts. 

Beginning at noon we kicked off our afternoon of DJ sets with Mike Schulman, head honcho of Slumberland Records, who played everything from cheery reverberant pop, to darker 80's post-punk and even some rocksteady ska to round out his hour.

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Bay Area: Start the Record Store Day 2012 Countdown! Your Guide to All Things RSD!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 16, 2012 08:30pm | Post a Comment


HEY BAY AREA! OMG, as the kids used to say last week. By the looks of that countdown widget above, Record Store Day 2012 is nearly upon us! What's Record Store Day, you say? Where have you been since 2008?! Under a rawk?

Record Store Day is our Chrismukkah! It's our Gay Days at Disneyland! It's better than Shark Week.werewolf day It might even be better then Werewolf Day, if there was such a thing. Officially, "Record Store Day is the one day that all of the independently owned record stores come together with artists to celebrate the art of music." And how! Special vinyl and CD releases are made exclusively for this holy day! This stuff is LIMITED and is destined to go up in value (for people who value limited, exclusive, amazing stuff). Find out just what sort of exclusive stuff I'm talking about by viewing, downloading, or having tattooed on your soul this RSD EXCLUSIVE RELEASES PDF! Print it out and bring it with you. Share with neighbors. 

But the spirit of RSD isn't just about what you can buy (although that's pretty great). It's also about what you can DO at each of our Amoeba locations! We've got all manner of fun awaiting you...and it starts the minute our doors open!

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Album Picks: Veronica Falls, Björk, Zola Jesus

Posted by Billy Gil, October 12, 2011 12:29pm | Post a Comment
Veronica Falls – Veronica Falls
 
While listening to Irish Grimestep or whatever genre happens to be unfathomably cool at the moment is great and all, sometimes you need meat and potatoes. In my case, that would be C86, shoegaze, college rock and that sort of thing, and Slumberland Records keeps serving up bands like sloppy joes that fulfill this particular hunger. Their latest band is Veronica Falls, which, despite their late-‘90s CW Network show sounding name, are actually a great garage pop band in the vein of Slumberland alumn Crystal Stilts, Girls Names and Black Tambourine. “Right Side of My Brain’s” bouncy pop gets C86 so right that it could have been on the original tape that spawned that genre. “The Fountain” is delectable guitar goth pop that displays one of the band’s best and at first easily overlooked tricks — pristine harmonies. “Beachy Head” injects a welcome bit of surf-rock meanness to an otherwise well-mannered album. It’s pretty much candy all over.
 
Björk – Biophilia
 
With all the hubbub surrounding Björk’s latest album (corresponding iPad apps to songs, a street date delay and rejiggering of sound), it may be easy to dismiss the album beneath it all. That would be a shame, because Biophilia is as brilliant as anything in Björk’s catalog, but that brilliance is quieter and takes repeated listens to understand compared with some of her previous efforts. Whereas she tried to recreate the violently happy turns of Debut and Post in 2007’s Volta, here she’s back to forging new sonic territory, using newly invented instruments (such as the gameleste, which combines Indonesian gamelan instruments with the key-based celeste instrument) and employing iPad-made music and programmed beats. Of course, none of that matters if it doesn’t end up sounding great, and you probably don’t need to know any of that to enjoy the songs on Biophilia, but it helps to understand the otherworldly nature of a song like “Crystalline,” which relies on the strange gameleste to build atmosphere before breaking into a hyper-intense hardcore breakbeat section. That that song and “Cosmogony,” a musical cousin to Björk classics like “Isobel” and “Bachelorette” that builds beautifully before disintegrating into a sea of descending vocals, are the most accessible songs tells you more. At its core, Biophilia is a wildly strange, even disturbing album, from the dissonant and gibberish-laden “Dark Matter” to the blood-curdling electronic sounds and ghostly vocals of “Hollow.” Then there’s “Mutual Core,” in which Björk tosses her fans a bone (although one on which the meat is tough and sinewy) with more typically “Björk” musical movements and more overtly clubby beats. But there’s something new to uncover with each listen, despite a somewhat hollow-sounding veneer, such as unusual time signatures, haunting lyrics and hidden, loping melodies. Biophilia really sounds nothing like anything else Björk has done, or anything anyone else has done, for that matter, and will probably upset some fans and detractors alike. For its gutsiness alone, it’s great; and for its more inspired moments, it’s something no music fan should miss hearing.
 
Zola Jesus – Conatus
 
For those who were expecting Zola Jesus aka Nika Roza Danilova turn around from last year’s winning Stridulum II with an album of glossy pop, think again. Sure, Conatus is her most accessible statement yet, but the album is still teaming with the experimental electronic music and ethereal vocals on which she built her name, only with slightly more of an emphasis on the electro balladry she exhibited so well on Stridulum’s “Night” and “Lightstick.” “Hikikomori” begins with throbbing synths and Danilovato’s yearning vocals intoning “blisters on my hands,” underpinned by subtle strings. On this track and several others on Conatus, you can hear the effort Danilova has put into carefully considering the album’s every movement, building songs gradually and deliberately, pulling at the heartstrings but always from afar, sometimes coming through clearly, sometimes unintelligible in a vocal styling reminiscent of Cocteau Twins’ Elizabeth Fraser. Her best songs manage to do it all at once, such as in the soaring “Seekir,” in which she aims for the gut (“Is there nothing left of the mess we made?” she asks in a moment that clears the sonic din to cut through) as well as the dance floor, although the result, with intertwining, ghostly backup vocals, is too complex to simply label a dance song. You sometimes long for more moments like that on Conatus (the epic choral build of “Lick The Palm Of The Burning Handshake” being another), but its balancing act of restraint and putting it all out there makes for intriguing listening that will keep fans happy and pull in plenty of new ones.