Amoeblog

The Music Side of Sins Invalid, the Film Documentary - by guest Amoeblogger Leroy Moore

Posted by Billyjam, October 10, 2013 10:45am | Post a Comment

While typically documentaries make the rounds of the film festivals circuit, college circuit, and (in the case of a big release) in theaters and/or on television. Hence people get to view or at least know of a film.  However, most of the time, if that film is a documentary and has music in it and is not solely about a musician, you don’t get to know the story regarding the music in said documentary.  The documentary Sins Invalid, which previews in Oakland this weekend (Oct 11th & 12th) at the New Parkway Theater, is a documentary about a performance project that celebrates artists with disabilities, centralizing artists of color and queer / gender-variant artists. Since 2006, its performances have explored sexuality, beauty, and the disabled body. Sins Invalid is an entryway into the taboo topic of sexuality and disability, manifesting a new paradigm – disability justice. Here I will focus on some of the music in this film that was produced by artists who are from the Bay Area and elsewhere.

Sins Invalid, the entity, is a Bay Area-based performance project that incubates and celebrates artists with disabilities, centralizing artists of color and queer and gender-variant artists as communities which have been historically marginalized. Our performance work explores the themes of sexuality, embodiment, and the disabled body. Conceived and led by disabled people of color, we develop and present cutting-edge work where normative paradigms of "normal" and "sexy" are challenged, offering instead a vision of beauty and sexuality inclusive of all individuals and communities.  Patty Berne, Todd Herman, Amanda Coslor, and myself (Leroy Moore) started Sins Invalid in 2006.  Since then it has grown from one annual performance to a year-round program with different kinds of performance workshops, disability justice education at colleges, and local and national organizations. In 2007 the beginnings of work on the Sins Invalid film, a documentary about our annual performances, took root.  Throughout the seven years of Sins Invalid we have worked with dancers, poets, performance actors/actresses, visual artists, and musicians from Canada, the United Kingdom, and all over the United States.  Poetry and music were always a part of Sins Invalid, since our first show back in 2006 with the soulful voice of Lee Williams, a wheelchair user who played Porgy in George Gershwin’s Porgy & Bess at the Black Repertory Theater in Berkeley, CA and who has appeared on the big screen in Made in America starring Whoopie Goldberg and Ted Danson.  Williams’ CD of spoken word & music, Phase V, was released in 2006.

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Krip-Hop Nation Mini-Concert Honoring Blind Joe, The Joe Capers Legacy in Black History Month And Beyond by Leroy Moore

Posted by Billyjam, February 12, 2013 06:02pm | Post a Comment
Leroy Moore (left), friend of Amoeba and the Amoeblog, returns to do another guest Amoeblog. The New York born, Berkeley, CA based artist/activist/educator, who is the founder of Krip-Hop Nation (the global collective for hip-hop artists with disabilities), has been featured several times here on the Amoeblog over the past five years for his work in Krip-Hop and also with Sins Invalid that he co-founded. In July 2008 he wrote an Amoeblog On Being Black and Disabled. Two years ago during Black History Month 2011 he was featured twice both here and here. Then last August he did a guest Amoeblog spot when he penned the popular critique on the Sundance Channel's Push Girls television show.

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Sins Invalid's Resident Alien Asks Audiences To Question Who Is Left Out of Art, Performance & Community

Posted by Billyjam, January 28, 2011 05:40pm | Post a Comment
 Sins Invalid Resident Alien
Now in its fifth year, the unique Bay Area based non-profit arts organization Sins Invalid is building momentum and garnering a following, both within the disabled community and in the mainstream, as it presents its message that people with disabilities are sexual beings too. The disabled are a minority who remain widely misunderstood by the general population. Since 2006, when the performance project Sins Invalid was founded by Patty Berne and Leroy Moore along with Todd Herman & Amanda Coslor as a platform for artists with disabilities to present their own sexual identities (rather than a misinformed mainstream media), the pioneering group has produced a series of works such as acclaimed mixed-media production An Unshamed Claim To Beauty at San Francisco's Brava Theater in 2006. This year planned events include the Sins Invalid Showcase, April 8 -10 at Z Space in San Francisco, and this weekend's Resident Alien: The Sins Invalid Artists In Residence Show tonight (Friday, Jan 28) at 8pm and tomorrow at the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts in San Francisco.
 

As co-founders and persons of color with a disability, both Moore and Berne are quick to make the analogy between people with disabilities and other ethnic minorities and members of the LGBT community. They note that all share that sense of exclusion and misunderstanding from an often well-meaning but generally ill informed mainstream who lack true insight into this "other" world which is "alien" to them -- hence the title of this weekend's Sins Invalid Artists In Residence Show: Resident Alien. "The idea of 'alien' came up a number of times. Lateef McLeod wrote a poem called "Not of This World" that explores that kind of othering, talking about the perception of disabled people as kind of monstrous or alien," said Nomy Lamm, the Artist In Residents' director. "Then, there are two artists, Fayza Bundalli and Redwolf Painter, who are culling a family history around colonization and the impact of colonization on their bodies, which led to their disabilities. The show is about the ways that so many of us in this culture are treated as aliens and not given the same kinds of rights. And yet, it is not about being victims; it's about how we come into our power in that context."

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SINS INVALID TACKLES MISPERCEPTIONS OF DISABILITY & SEXUALITY

Posted by Billyjam, September 5, 2008 09:00am | Post a Comment
Sins Invalid @ Brava Theater SF this weekend
Tonight and tomorrow night at 8PM  (Friday/Saturday, Sept. 5/6th) at the Brava Theater at 2789 24th Street in San Francisco will be the third year of one of the most envelope pushing performance projects tackling the topic of sexuality and disability:
Sins Invalid: An Unshamed Claim to Beauty in the Face of Invisibility.

Amoeblog caught up with Patricia Berne, the director of Sins Invalid, to ask her about this most unique performance project and this weekend's two performances that include singer/songwriter Nomy Lamm.

AMOEBLOG: For those who know nothing about Sins Invalid, can you describe what it is?

PATRICIA BERNE: Sins Invalid is a performance project which incubates and celebrates artists with disabilities, centralizing on artists of color and queer and gender-variant artists as communities who have been historically marginalized. Our performance work explores the themes of sexuality,  embodiment and the disabled body. Conceived and led by disabled people of color, we develop and present cutting-edge work where normative paradigms of "normal" and "sexy" are challenged, offering instead a vision of beauty and sexuality inclusive of all individuals and communities. We define disability broadly to include people with physical impairments, who are a sensory minority, people with emotional disabilities, people with cognitive challenges, those with chronic/severe illness, individuals who identify as disabled due to intersex conditions or gender variance, and others who may identify as disabled because their bodies do not conform to society's notions  of "normal" or able-bodied.

AMOEBLOG: What are the most common misconceptions on the topic of   sexuality and disability?

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