Amoeblog

Music History Monday: January 6

Posted by Jeff Harris, January 6, 2014 09:50am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: January 6, 1957 - Elvis Presley will make his third and final appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show. Due to the previous controversy generated by his movement on stage, Presley will only be shot from the waist up. The singer will perform "Hound Dog," "Love Me Tender," "Heartbreak Hotel," "Don't Be Cruel," "Too Much," and "(There'll Be) Peace In The Valley (For Me)." The appearance is a huge success and will be seen by over sixty million people, generating the single largest viewing audience in television history at that time. Only two days after this show airs, Presley will receive notice from the Memphis draft board that he is to be drafted into the United States Army.
 


On this day in music history: January 6, 1958 - The Gibson Guitar Company registers its design for flying vthe Flying V guitar with the US Patent Office. The unique instrument is designed by Gibson president Ted McCarty with the intention of adding a futuristic aspect to the companies image. During their original manufacturing run, the guitar's body and neck are constructed from African Korina wood and mahogany with either ebony or rosewood fretboards. Guitarists such as Albert King and Lonnie Mack will adapt to them immediately and will become closely associated with both artists. However, initial sales will be slow and they will be discontinued in 1959. When guitarists like Jimi Hendrix and Dave Davies of The Kinks begin playing them, it will renew interest in the Flying V and Gibson will reintroduce the guitar in 1967. The instrument will become a favorite of hard rock and heavy metal musicians during the 1970s and '80s. Original Flying V's made in 1958 and 1959 today are valued at between $200,000 and $250,000. To this day, the Flying V remains one of Gibson's most popular guitars.

Continue reading...

Music History Monday: May 27

Posted by Jeff Harris, May 27, 2013 09:45am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.


Born on this day: May 27, 1957 - Punk and alternative music icon Siouxsie Sioux of Siouxsie & The Banshees and The Creatures (born Susan Janet Ballion in London, UK). Happy 56th birthday, Siouxsie!
 


On this day in music history: May 27, 1972 - "Oh Girl" by The Chi-Lites hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week, also topping the R&B singles chart for two weeks on June 3rd. Written and produced by Eugene Record, it is the biggest pop hit, and the second R&B chart topper for the Chicago based R&B quartet. Record will write and demo the song, then forget about it for a time. Producer and arranger Carl Davis will hear the demo and tell The Chi-Lites lead vocalist that he has a potential hit on his hands. Recorded at Universal Recording Studios in Chicago, the track is engineered by Bruce Swedien (Michael Jackson, Quincy Jones) and features Record playing bass and guitar on the track along with other members of Brunswick's regular rhythm section including Quinton Joseph (drums) and Tom Washington, aka "Tom Tom 84," (piano). Issued as a single on March 2, 1972, the song will receive a major boost when The Chi-Lites appear on comedian Flip Wilson's top rated comedy/variety program. At first the producers of the show will expect them to perform their recent hit "Have You Seen Her," but after hearing the brand new song, they'll change their minds and emphatically agree to the group's request to perform their new single for the first time on national television. Entering the Hot 100 at #80 on April 8, 1972, it will climb to the top of the chart seven weeks later, ending Roberta Flack's six week run at the top with "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face." "Oh Girl" will be certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

Continue reading...

Music History Monday: January 14

Posted by Jeff Harris, January 14, 2013 12:00pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: January 14, 1977Low, the eleventh studio album by David Bowie is released. Produced by Bowie and Tony Visconti, it is recorded at the Chateau d'Herouville in Herouville, France in Late 1976. It is the first of Bowie's "Berlin Trilogy," the first of his songwriting and musical collaborations with Brian Eno, though the album is recorded in France and mixed at Hansa Studios in Berlin. Bowie will move to Berlin to get away from Los Angeles where his previous album Station To Station was recorded. Many of the songs are about personal issues Bowie is dealing with, including kicking his addiction to cocaine. It will spin off the single "Sound And Vision" (#3 UK, #69 US Pop), and will come to be regarded as one of his best and most influential works. Low will peak at #2 on the UK album chart and #11 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

Continue reading...

R.I.P. Jennifer Miro, Singer of San Francisco's Seminal Punk Band The Nuns

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 5, 2012 11:37pm | Post a Comment
Jennifer "Miro" Anderson, singer of San Francisco's early punk band The Nuns, passed away at the age ofthe nuns, jennifer miro anderson, dominatrix, mistress jennifer 54 on December 16th in New York City as a result of complications from cancer. 

Getting their start in Marin, The Nuns began performing in the San Francisco in 1976 when they made their debut at the Mabuhay Gardens. By 1978, they had a show at Winterland Ballroom with The Avengers and Sex Pistols. The band split just a year later, but reunited in 1986 and again in 1997 with a more goth rock sheen. By this point, Jennifer Miro had become a popular fetish model and an aspiring screenwriter. Eventually, she went to work for a law office.

Despite suffering from both liver and lung cancer, Miro denied conventional treatment and painkillers, opting for exercise and homeopathic paths. 

Here is a clip from The Nun’s show at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco in 1978.

The Late Phil Lynott Further Ups His Iconic Status with Dublin Exhibition Dedicated to the Thin Lizzy Legend

Posted by Billyjam, May 11, 2011 11:43am | Post a Comment

At any given time, diehard Phil Lynott fans can find good reason to visit Dublin, Ireland -- but recently the incentive to visit the late great Thin Lizzy singer's hometown has increased greatly due to the ongoing Philip Lynott Exhibition, an impressive, large scale and reverential expo dedicated to the iconic Irish rock figure.

Since his premature death 25 years ago Lizzy fanatics (and there are many) have been making pilgrimages to Lynott's grave in Saint Fintan’s Cemetery in Sutton (8 miles north of Dublin City centre on the Howth Peninsula) and placing flowers and sundry Thin Lizzy memorabilia by the singer's headstone which, fittingly, is designed by Irish artist Jim Fitzpatrick, whose traditional Celtic designs graced the covers of many Lizzy records such as Vagabonds of the Western World and Johnny The Fox.

Another major attraction in Dublin for Lynott/Lizzy fans is the life size bronze statue (above with temporary Amoeba sticker) of Lynott leaning on his guitar outside outside Bruxelles pub on Harry Street just off Grafton Street -- a high foot traffic Dublin city centre thoroughfare. Since it was erected six years ago the statue's draw has matched that of monuments and statues dedicated to key Irish historical figures. Similarly, Phil Lynott's figure at the Dublin Waxwork Museum is one of its most popular attractions. But it is the ongoing exhibit, which runs through next month, that has been the most rewarding shrine of all for the legions of visiting Lizzy/Lynott fanatics.

Continue reading...
<<  1  2  >>  NEXT