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Music History Monday: November 24

Posted by Jeff Harris, November 24, 2014 10:40am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: November 24, 1966 - The Beatles will begin recording "Strawberry Fields Forever" at Abbey Road Studios in London. After a three month vacation, the band will return to the studio to begin work on the follow up to "Revolver." The first song recorded is a new composition of John Lennon's titled "Strawberry Fields Forever." Lennon will write the song in Almeria, Spain while filming How I Won The War with director Richard Lester in the early Fall of 1966. One take of the song will be recorded that evening, though it'll change dramatically and grow more complex over the month that it takes to complete the track. The song will mark the beginning of a new era in the band's creativity that will change the face of popular music yet again. The song is named for a Salvation Army orphanage around the corner from Lennon's childhood home in Liverpool where he would attend garden parties in the summer. Once in the studio, the song will evolve from a gentle, sparsely arranged ballad to a heavily scored piece with horns and strings complimenting the basic track. The finished version of the song will consist of two separate versions. Lennon will like the first half of the first remake and the second half of another. He will suggest to producer George Martin that the two be edited together, which at first seems to not be possible since they are recorded in different keys and tempos. Martin will discover that by increasing the speed of one and slowing down the other recording, that they will match. Originally intended to be part of the band's next album (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band), "Strawberry Fields Forever" will instead be issued as one half of a double A-sided single in February 1967 (w/ "Penny Lane"). It will peak at #2 on the UK singles chart and #8 on the Billboard Hot 100.
 

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Music History Monday: July 21

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 21, 2014 07:25am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 21, 1948 - Singer, songwriter, musician, and humanitarian Yusuf Islam (aka Cat Stevens, born Steven Demetre Georgiou in Marylebone, London, UK.). Happy 66th birthday, Yusuf/Cat!
 


On this day in music history: July 21, 1972The Slider, the seventh album by T. Rex is released. Produced by Tony Visconti, it is recorded at Rosenberg Studios in Copenhagen, Denmark; Château d'Hérouville in Paris, France; and Elektra Studios in Los Angeles from March - April 1972. Issued as the follow up to band's glam classic Electric Warrior, Marc Bolan and the band will begin recording at the Château d'Hérouville outside of Paris on the recommendation of his friend Elton John, while on tax exile from the UK. The basic tracks will be completed in only five days, before moving on to other studios in Denmark and the US to complete the overdubs and mixing. The album will spin off the hit singles "Metal Guru" and Telegram Sam." The album's iconic cover photo is taken by producer Tony Visconti (though on the original album cover it is erroneously credited to Ringo Starr who at the time is directing a concert film featuring Bolan and T. Rex titled "Born To Boogie"). The Slider will peak at number four on the UK album chart and number 17n on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: November 4

Posted by Jeff Harris, November 4, 2013 10:23am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: November 4, 1970The Man Who Sold The World, the third album by David Bowie is released. Produced by Tony Visconti, it is recorded at Trident Studios and Advision Studios in London from April 18 - May 22, 1970. Following his breakthrough success in the UK with the single and album Space Oddity in the Fall of 1969, David Bowie will return to the studio in the spring of 1970 to record the follow up. The album features musicians that form the nucleus of the Spiders From Mars Band, which include guitarist Mick Ronson and drummer Mick Woodmansey, and also marks the birth of the glam rock movement. The title track will become one of Bowie's best known and loved songs. It will be influential on numerous musicians including The Cure, Siouxsie And The Banshees, Gary Numan, Nine Inch Nails, and Kurt Cobain of Nirvana.Cobain will record a cover version on their MTV Unplugged in New York album in 1993. The Man Who Sold The Earth's original cover photo featuring Bowie wearing a dress will not be issued in the US, and is replaced with a cartoon drawing. The album will peak at #26 on the UK album chart and #105 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: June 10

Posted by Jeff Harris, June 10, 2013 10:03am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: June 10, 1972 - "The Candy Man" by Sammy Davis, Jr. hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for two weeks on May 20th. Written by Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse, it is the biggest hit for the Harlem, NY-born singer, actor, and entertainer. The song is originally written for the film Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory in 1971. The original version of the song is sung by actor Aubrey Woods in the film. Entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr. will record "The Candy Man" shortly after the release of Willy Wonka and is included on his album Sammy Davis Jr. Now! The track is produced by MGM Records president Mike Curb, legendary producer/arranger Don Costa, and Michael Viner (Incredible Bongo Band). It also features background vocals by the Mike Curb Congregation who had previously recorded it before Davis, but failed to chart with it. Entering the Hot 100 at #97 on March 11, 1972, it will climb to the top of the chart thirteen weeks later. "The Candy Man" will be certified Gold in the US by the RIAA, selling over two million copies in the US.
 

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Fools In Love Songs

Posted by Billyjam, April 1, 2013 01:31pm | Post a Comment
There are a lot of songs on the topic of fools and even more songs on being in love. But for today, April Fool's Day, I have assembled some random songs about both - about fools in love or people falling foolishly into love. We've all been there and done that and hence can relate, no doubt, to the selection of songs I've assembled below (via YouTube) about fools in love.

Included is the song "Fools In Love" by Joe Jackson - the single off his great album Look Sharp in which he cynically muses, albeit from first hand experience, on: "Fools in love, are there any creatures more pathetic? Fools in love, never knowing when they've lost the game." Other songs about fools in love include the 1956 #1 hit from the very young Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers "Why Do Fools Fall In Love" (a live TV rendition from 1956 from WNEW's The Frankie Lane Show with a funny interview beforehand). The song, which has been covered by folks such as Diana Ross and Joe Ely, poses that eternal question: "Why do fools fall in love?"  Also below is Journey-man Steve Perry's 80's pop rock ballad mega-hit "Foolish Heart" (off his Street Talk LP) and Rod Stewart's version of Elvin Bishop's hit "Fooled Around And Fell In Love."

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