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Talib Kweli & Res (Idle Warship) Are Genuine Music Fans as seen in new What's In My Bag?

Posted by Billyjam, April 26, 2012 09:40am | Post a Comment

What's In My Bag? with Res & Talib Kweli of Idle Warship (2012)

I love how both Res and Talib Kweli of super-duo Idle Warship are genuine music fans and true supporters of their fellow artists as proven in the above What's In My Bag? video recently shot at Amoeba Hollywood. In this latest What's In My Bag? segment Res (pronounced Reese), who confided that whenever Talib releases a new CD that she cops six copies of it, picked up such releases as Nikka Costa, Crosby Stills & Nash, and female vocalist Havana who she got turned onto it after hearing it been played over the Sunset Blvd. Amoeba sound system. 

Meanwhile Talib Kweli, who was clearly quite pleased with his Beatles "Yellow Submarine" poster find, picked up a grip of music including some late 2011 releases he was catching up on - the latest releases from  his "friends" The Roots (Undun) and Common (The Dreamer/The Believer) stressing how it is important for him to support music since he asks others to do so of his music.  And you can support Idle Warship by buying their November release Habits of the Heart directly from Amoeba. And for more artists shares of their goodies found at Amoeba check out the numerous other videos in the series What's In My Bag?

The Wrong Way: African Americans in Rock, by Cas

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, February 27, 2010 03:01pm | Post a Comment
kyp malone tv on the radio

Kyp Malone and I shared an “Afro-punk moment” a few years ago. We were at Bimbo’s 365 Club in San Francisco where Kyp’s band, TV on the Radio, had opened for The Faint. The show was just letting out when I ran into the furry, bespectacled guitarist and co-vocalist milling about in the lobby of the venue. I struck up a conversation, letting him know I’d caught the previous night’s show of the same bill at The Grand Regency Ballroom. We’d been talking for some time when a young white indie kid broke away from the pack of even more young white indie kids that passed by and approached Kyp and me, smiling that “OMG” smile. “You guys were great tonight” she beamed, at first addressing me. There was this split second of confusion when I didn’t know how to respond since, you know, I was holding it down in thetv on the radio audience that night. I kind of chuckled and motioned towards Kyp, remarking that he was the guy she wanted to thank. Kyp, being mischievous, motioned right back at me, letting her know that I was the guy to thank. We let it hang for one beat before letting the embarrassed girl off the hook. Kyp thanked her for the compliment, his genuine smile defusing the girl’s embarrassment. After she dove back into the throng, Kyp turned to me and said, “That happens all the time...whenever I’m standing with any other black dude.” We laughed. 

Taking the diplomatic route, I guess I couldn’t really blame the girl for thinking I was a member of the band, except I don’t bear that much of a resemblance to any of the guys in TVOTR. Sure, we share some African ancestry, taste in eyewear and facial hair grooming concepts. But we don’t really look alike. Do we? Regardless, amongst all of the people that were at Bimbo’s that night, Kyp and I stuck out, even though only one of us was on stage under spotlights.

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Ten Questions For Talib Kweli

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 27, 2009 01:10am | Post a Comment

Talib Kweli can easily be crowned as one of Brooklyn’s finest mc’s. For years the industry veteran has championed positive portrayals of urban society through his eternally omniscient lyrics. After the critical and commercial success on Black Star, Kweli, alongside “Ms. Fat Booty” himself, Mos Def, forced record labels to pay closer attention to underground Hip-Hop. Before the Internet, an underground artist struggled immensely without the help of perpetual touring. Needless to say, the crowned emcee puts on a concert better than blueberry pancakes and mimosas on a breezy Sunday morning. He takes “hip-hop live” to a whole new level. Check out this EXCLUSIVE footage of Talib and long time collaborator Hi-Tek putting it down last week in Austin, TX at SXSW to a live band and a packed house.

 
                                                   (video courtesy of Paul Stewart of Next-Thing)

I caught up with Talib and asked him ten simple questions. We chopped it up about the upcoming Reflection Eternal: Train of Thought II album -- one of the most anticipated albums of '09 -- Blacksmith artist Jean Grae, Strong Arm Steady, his collaboration with R&B singer Res, and the possibility of a Black Star Reunion.

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