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The '80s List: Part 10

Posted by Amoebite, September 2, 2011 12:46pm | Post a Comment
Wipers One day at Amoeba Hollywood I proclaimed that Aztec Camera's 1983 release High Land, Hard Rain was one of the best records of the '80s. This single statement eventually led to over 200 Amoebites ranking their top 10 favorite albums from the ‘80s.

From the beginning we realized that it was impossible for most of us to condense our favorites from all genres into a tiny top ten list. So, we limited our lists to Rock/Pop and its sub-genres like punk, metal, goth, and new wave. Even so, it was a difficult selection process because not only are there hundreds of amazing records to consider, there is also the added dynamic of time.

The '80s were a long time ago and the music has had many years to gestate. We have a deep sense of nostalgia and sentiment with these albums as our fondest memories are associated with them. These are albums we LOVE.

- Henry Polk

P.S. We'll be posting new additions to the '80s list project from Amoeba staff members on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. See all entries in our ‘80s list series.

P.P.S. The '80s List Book is available for sale at Amoeba Hollywood.


Heather Long

Pixies Doolittle (1989)
Husker DuZen Arcade (1984)
Judas PriestBritish Steel (1980)
X – Los Angeles (1980)
PretendersPretenders (1980)
The Cure – Disintegration (1989)
The ClashLondon Calling (1980)
Duran DuranRio (1982)
Iron MaidenThe Number Of The Beast (1982)
Adam And The AntsKings Of The Wild Frontier (1980)

Continue reading...

The 80s List: Part 3

Posted by Amoebite, August 17, 2011 04:31pm | Post a Comment
Black FlagOne day at Amoeba Hollywood I proclaimed that Aztec Camera's 1983 release High Land, Hard Rain was one of the best records of the '80s. This single statement eventually led to over 200 Amoebites ranking their top 10 favorite albums from the ‘80s. 

From the beginning we realized that it was impossible for most of us to condense our favorites from all genres into a tiny top ten list. So, we limited our lists to Rock/Pop and its sub-genres like punk, metal, goth, and new wave
Even so, it was a difficult selection process because not only are there hundreds of amazing records to consider, there is also the added dynamic of time. 

The '80s were a long time ago and the music has had many years to gestate. We have a deep sense of nostalgia and sentiment with these albums as our fondest memories are associated with them. These are albums we LOVE.

-  Henry Polk

P.S. We'll be posting new additions to the '80s list project from Amoeba staff members on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. See all entries in our ‘80s list series

P.P.S. The '80s List Book is available for sale at Amoeba Hollywood.


Alyssa Siegel
The ReplacementsTim (1985)
X –  More Fun In The New World (1983)
R.E.M. – Murmur (1983)
PixiesDoolittle (1989)
The FeeliesThe Good Earth (1985)
Rockpile - Seconds Of Pleasure (1980)
Nick HaeffnerThe Great Indoors (1987)
Chris StameyIt’s Alright (1987)
The Gun ClubFire Of Love (1981)
Tom Petty & The HeartbreakersHard Promises (1981)

Alex Chilton Dies At 59. Big Star's Anticipated SxSW Appearance This Saturday Now May Become A Tribute To The Influential Artist

Posted by Billyjam, March 17, 2010 11:09pm | Post a Comment
alex chilton
Highly influential American singer-guitarist Alex Chilton, best known for his membership in the groups The Box Tops and Big Star, as well as his solo work, died earlier today (3/17) in a New Orleans hospital reportedly the result of heart problems. He was 59.

Chilton was only sixteen when he found himself with the number one pop hit in the country in 1967 with the Box Tops'  hit single “The Letter.” By the end of the decade the group had broken up and Chilton (whom the Replacements wrote a song about, which is known to a new generation from being playable in Rock Band 2) went on to form the influential (albeit never commercially big) power-pop group Big Star.

The group was to be one of the biggest attractions at this year’s SXSW music festival, happening in Austin, Texas this week. The reunited  Big Star (who played the Fillmore in SF three years ago) was scheduled to play this Saturday (3/20) night.  Earlier that day both Big Star drummer Jody Stephens and Big Star bassist Andy Hummel (who are already in Austin tonight) were booked to appear on a SxSW music panel (Chilton was not booked on the same panel) all about Big Star and their influence. According to a few sources down in Austin tonight, Chilton's bandmates are considering going ahead with the panel, only now it will become a tribute to the late great Alex Chilton. And as for exactly what will happen in place of the scheduled Big Star concert late Saturday night, it is still uncertain but many are already speculating that it will become a big scale tribute concert with many surprise guests performing in honor of the man.

Big Star "Thirteen" from the 1972 LP #1 Record (Ardent/Stax)

The Employee Interview Pt XXIII: Tom Lynch

Posted by Miss Ess, November 6, 2009 02:30pm | Post a Comment
Tom Lynch
12 Years Employment
Buyer Extraordinaire

rocket 455

Miss Ess: How did you end up at Amoeba?


Tom Lynch: I was working at Car City Records in Detroit, my co-worker, Geoff Walker, had just come back from his vacation to the Bay Area and told me about Amoeba opening in SF and looking for used LP buyers. Geoff had applied on a whim, got interviewed, and offered the job. Geoff came back , decided to go to grad school, declined the offer, and told me that I should give it a go. I was up for a change, not to mention Ireplacements had just been in a  wreck and had no more van and had no money to buy another one. So fate really forced my hand. I've always felt that they never really got over Geoff turning them down.  

ME: What is the best live show you have ever seen?

TL: Being one of three people in the audience as The Replacements ripped through their set at St. Andrews Hall in Detroit, July 1983. Everyone else was in the bar below the club watching Siouxsie & the Banshees videos. My pal John Maxwell & I and this weird short guy were the only people watching them -- they were opening for R.E.M. -- and this short guy was wearing a cowboy hat and cowboy boots, doing these sliding dance moves and was yelling at the 'Mat's to get off the stage. They were blazing hot; when nobody was looking they would crush you with their ferocity. They just laughed at him, threw lit cigarettes at him.