Amoeblog

Gorillasploitation - Giant Gorilla Movies

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 8, 2014 09:48am | Post a Comment

 
Aurora King Kong model

I have liked gorillas from an early age. I think I was eleven when I read Dian Fossey's Gorilla's in the Mist, shortly after finishing Jane Goodall's In the Shadow of Man; both works made me want to pursue ethology or primatology for many years afterward. My fascination with gorillas went further back -- past the Donkey Kong game which I was pretty good at (if hardly King of Kong material) at least back to toddlerdom, when I carried around a wallet which contained, if memory serves, a picture of a glow-in-the-dark Aurora model of King Kong

 
 
 
GORILLAS IN THE WEST
 
 
Gorillas are the largest primates on earth. Their strength is estimated to be between six and fifteen times that of a human and they have rather large and intimidating canines. A silverback could, rest assured, easily best any human in hand-to-hand combat. Gorillas, however, are not at all blood thirsty. The occasional snack of ants is all that keeps them from being classifiable as vegans and they generally (and understandably) avoid encounters with humans. Reality, in this case, has traditionally had little bearing on the European imagination, though, and Western artists have frequently endowed the peaceful creatures with their own human feelings  composed -- as Charles Baudelaire said -- partly of terror and partly of priapic curiosity.
 

MENAGERIES AND FANTASIES

Blow some my way -- Exploring Chesterfield Square

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 14, 2013 12:12pm | Post a Comment
Chesterfield Square signs
Chesterfield Square signs

INTRODUCTION
 TO CHESTERFIELD SQUARE

Chesterfield Square is without a doubt, one of Los Angeles’s most obscure neighborhoods. The obscurity is somewhat surprising given the neighborhood’s longstanding and dubious distinction of having the city’s and county’s highest violent crime rate. As a matter of fact, most of the Los Angeles’s most crime-ridden neighborhoods are rather obscure – communities like Compton, South Central, and Watts aren’t even in the top ten.

Divine protection
Divine protection

Although I don’t in any way wish to minimize the seriousness of crime, both visitors and residents of the neighborhood are more likely to be felled by heart disease, cancer, an accident or suicide than by violent criminals -- especially those who are not or don't appear to be affiliated with a gang. Furthermore, citywide violent crime rates for Los Angeles are the lowest they’ve been since 1966. It may be rough by Los Angeles standards but it's hardly San Pedro Sula. In other words, nothing bad is going to happen to you.

Continue reading...

City Scenes: The Brothers Comatose Present "It Came from Beneath the Sea," Sept. 20th

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, September 5, 2012 04:11pm | Post a Comment
On Thursday, September 20th, Cinema SF and folkYEAH present the sixth installment of City Scenes, theit came from beneath the sea on-going series that pairs musicians with their favorite San Francisco films.

This month, local folk string-band The Brothers Comatose, who Brothers Comatoserecently sold out the Great American Music Hall for their album release show, have picked a winner with one of the only monster distruction movies based in San Francisco! Yes, it's Ray Harryhausen's It Came from Beneath the Sea! Preceding the screening, The Brothers Comatose will play a set of vintage sea-shanties, maritime folk numbers, and their own homespun Americana-tinged originals.

Get advance tickets at www.cinemasf.com/vogue or at the Vogue Theatre box office!

More about It Came from Beneath the Sea:

Hollywood has put San Francisco through a lot. From Pod People infesting the Civic Center in Invasion of the Body Snatchers to Steve McQueen’s automotive carnage in Bullitt, audiences and filmmakers alike have always taken a certain glee in seeing havoc run amok in the picturesque hills and dollhouse neighborhoods of San Francisco. But in 1955, Columbia Pictures’ It Came from Beneath the Sea took SF destruction to Godzilla-like proportions. The plot is classic cold-war sci-fi: nuclear testing in the Pacific Ocean has roused the ire of a giant octopus that starts sinking submarines and the odd cargo liner before setting its sights on the Golden Gate Bridge. With stop animation by special effects wizard Ray Harryhausen, It Came from Beneath the Sea is a classic of the golden-age of monster movies and a rarely screened San Francisco treat.