Movies for Mother's Day

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 10, 2015 08:02am | Post a Comment
Mary Cassatt After the Bath (circa 1901)
Mary Cassatt's After the Bath (circa 1901)

The American Mother's Day was invented by Anna Jarvis in 1905, when her own mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, died. Her mother's death proved the inspiration for a holiday and by 1908 others joined her in this macabre celebration.

After five years of dedication to her obsession, Mother's Day was first observed in West Virginia in 1910. Although writing "I love you" on a post-it note would be more meaningful, by the 1920s consumers dutifully purchased pre-made Mother's Day cards from the Hallmark corporation. Disgusted by this perversion of her crazy vision, Jarvis unsuccessfully tried to kill Mother's Day. 

Whatever you do this Mother's Day, please don't spend $17.95 on a Spring Multicolor Floral Infinity Scarf, $24.95 on a Bronze Metal Birdcage Lantern Wall Decoration, or $29.95 on a Coral-inspired Jewelry Tree. Instead, take her on a hike, go for a swim, eat a type of cuisine neither of you've ever had before, go to the ballet... or watch one of these films.

Mother (마더, Bong Joon-ho, 2010)

Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)

Mildred Pierce
(Michael Curtiz, 1945)

Return to Grey Gardens, October 12!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 7, 2013 07:01pm | Post a Comment

Is your style icon Little Edie? Think dilapidated is the new black? Then YOU need to join Peaches Christ at grey gardens peaches christthe Castro Theatre on Saturday, October 12th for a special screening of the Maysles brothers' seminal 1976 documentary film Grey Gardens. Preceeding the film will be the premiere of an original stage-show called "Return to Grey Gardens" starring Peaches Christ, Jinkx Monsoon, and special guest Mink Stole!

The stage-show is set forty years into the future and documents the lives of an aging drag mother and her bitter drag daughter who continue to perform for an empty house at the now dilapidated and run-down Castro Theater. How did this happen? What will become of them? Will their famous and successful royal drag cousin Lady Bear step up and help out? Find out when we return to Grey Gardens on October 12th! Two shows: 3pm & 8pm! 

Get your tickets NOW!

Cinema Direct vs. Cinema Verite - The Quest for Cinematic Truth

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 15, 2007 12:55pm | Post a Comment
Today marks the one billionth time the term "cinéma vérité" was used in a manner with which I don't agree. This time it was in reference to a shaky-cam advertisement for blue jeans or cell phones or something. 

Cinéma Direct

Cinéma Direct is documentary genre that began in Quebec in 1958. The Quiet Revolution, a cultural assertion of the French-speaking majority under the rule of the Anglo-minority, encouraged the development of a distinct Quebecois identity. As part of this cultural expression, filmmakers sought to re-instill truthfulness in the documentary genre, which, by the 1950s was usually studio-based propaganda rife with dramatizations and mickey mousing. In 1922's Nanook of the North, for example, Nanook (actually an Inuit named Allakariallak living in Inukjuak, Quebec) was built an oversized igloo to share with his wife (who wasn't really his wife) to allow a camera crew and sufficient lighting inside. He was filmed hunting with a harpoon. In the scene, Allakariallak looks in the direction of the camera laughing and smiling memorably. He only knew how to hunt with guns. You can almost hear Robert Flaherty taking him aside and asking, "Could you act... you know... more Eskimo?"