Amoeblog

New 12"s @ Amoeba Hollywood 2/1 - Helium Robots, Locked Groove, Demdike Stare, Pittsburgh Track Authority and more

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, February 1, 2012 11:58am | Post a Comment

Helium Robots
Jarza EP - Theo Parrish 12"
Running Back

EWAN WILMOTT, here as HELIUM ROBOTS, provides 2 brilliant tracks to the RUNNING BACK label - imaginative electro, balearic, disco music. On the flip, THEO PARRISH remixes "JARZA" and brings 2 different outcomes - both of which are magical trips through sound. Essential!

Purchase Jarza here:





Locked Groove
Rooted 12"
Hotflush

Hotflush presents the debut 12" from Belgian newcomer Locked Groove aka Tim Van de Meutter. The young producer delivers three hypnotizing and genre bending tracks that expertly weave the sounds of Berghain, soulful house and UK garage into a single crushing package. The Rooted EP draws you in with the title track, bouncing along to an acid baseline, then moves onto 'Drowning,' a moody techno track that was included on Scuba's DJ-Kicks mix compilation, filled with drum and ambient samples taken from field recordings. Lastly, 'Change,' a production that smartly melds classic house grooves with industrial techno, demonstrates Locked Groove's rhythmic finesse and long-term promise as an artist.

Purchase Rooted here:

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New 12"s @ Amoeba Hollywood 11/16 Jurgen Muller, John Daly, Marcel Dettmann, Elektro Guzzi, Lowtec, Untold and more

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, November 15, 2011 05:32pm | Post a Comment
Jurgen Muller
Science Of The Sea LP
Digitalis

New and perhaps final repress, all copies are on a marbled metallic sky blue vinyl. Jürgen Müller was a self-taught amateur musician who, while studying oceanic science at the University of Kiel, purchased some electronic instruments and set up a mobile studio on his house boat, docked along the town of Heikendorf, on the North Sea. He held a life-long fascination with the ocean, the expansive and endless inner-space of the deep, where he felt many ecological miracles had yet to be discovered, and which kindled a love for the unknown. This love of all things nautical started early in his youth and eventually led him to study the oceanic sciences. For one week in 1979, Jürgen took up with a film crew on a mission to document some sea-water toxicity testing that was being performed by a couple of notable biologists, only a few kilometers offshore. At the end of the expedition, he decided that he would make music to capture the strange feeling conjured by these experiences. Utilizing only a handful of barely-remembered childhood piano lessons, Jürgen set about creating his marine-influenced vignettes with some electronic instruments he had gathered through friends, as well as borrowing some new equipment from a local school's music department. As a general music lover, earlier in the '70s he had taken note of several avant-garde electronic composers who he felt simultaneously captured a purity of sound and sense of wonder that was lacking in other music. He dreamt of fusing this ideal with the synthetic recreations of nature. In a sense, one could say he stumbled onto an early "new age" aesthetic through pure ignorance and coincidence. Mixing relaxing ambient tones and spooky, otherworldly sounds, he came up with a unique approach. After filling several reels of home recordings, he held ambitions of becoming a film composer. He decided to start his own publishing company, Neue Wissenschaft, and hoped to compose albums to sell as production music to various film companies for use in documentaries and television programs. As he was simultaneously hard at work on his studies to finish school, he had to work on his music in short intervals, and often had to put it aside altogether. As a result, it took several years for him to actually realize his sole full-length recording, Science Of The Sea, the sessions for which began in late 1981, before finishing a year later. Less than 100 copies were pressed, and few of them were even sent out to potential clients. Most copies were eventually given to friends and family. Jürgen's musical gamble never quite paid off as he had hoped, and without any outside interest or connections in the music world, he soon abandoned any dreams of a musical existence and instead chose to further his oceanographic career. Remastered from the original tapes by Brad Rose. Cut to vinyl at Dubplates & Mastering, Berlin and pressed in Germany.

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New 12" Electronic releases at Amoeba LA - Marcel Dettman, Roman Flugel, Kate Simko, T++, Marek Hemmann & More

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, May 5, 2010 10:17am | Post a Comment


MARCEL DETTMANN
Dettmann 3LP
(Ostgut)

This is the debut long-player by Berghain's resident DJ, producer and remixer Marcel Dettmann. Intrinsically tied to the myth that is Berghain by now, the attached label Ostgut Ton and at the same time with the regeneration of no-frills, cleansed and powerful electronic music, Marcel Dettmann managed a daring feat: the production of a truly absorbing and veritable techno album. Spread out over these tracks, Dettmann transports the raw energy, the rough aesthetics and the simple grace of techno. A Berliner-by-choice, the difficult format doesn't bog him down. Neither does he give in to exhausting finger exercises that try to supersede his learned trade, nor does he confront the listener with hasty or brutal tracks that would rather feel at home pressed on a 12" in a DJ-case. Tracks like "Reticle," "Drawing," "Captivate" or "Silex" seem like the convergence of his striking efforts and discography up until now. You get contemplative moments with almost-weightless layers of sound that get used like melodies or chords, rotating with condensed, intensified and sappy snatches. Rigour and austere beauty go hand-in-hand. Surprisingly enough, with a genre that is aware of its own history, Dettmann never falls prey to the dangerous and seductive nature of nostalgia. However, Dettmann sounds as fresh and self-contained as techno nowadays can be. And more so, it once and for all establishes its eponym as a genre mainstay. However described or classified, his music is a successful meditation about the art form we call techno.

Listen to "Captivate" here:


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New Electronic/House 12" at Amoeba Hollywood: Innervisions, Cadenza, Robag Wruhme, The Revenge and more...

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, March 5, 2010 12:56pm | Post a Comment


HENRIK SCHWARZ/AME/DIXON

A Critical Mass Live EP 12"
Innervisions

As a result of 2009's "A Critical Mass" tour, Innervisions release two tracks recreated from the recorded live material. The A-side is based on the former Henrik Schwarz hit "Chicago." This new, eerie, bleepy techno version has a touch of early M-Plant production and was recorded during the Flow Festival in Helsinki in August 2009. "Berlin-Karlsruhe Express" is an aquatic Drexciyan house inferno by Henrik Schwarz/Âme/Dixon, and was the highlight of every live show.









ROBAG WRUHME

Dreiklangkrapriolen 12"
Musik Krause (MKR 031)

Robag Wruhme returns toting three nuggets which are somewhere between gentle hardcore with a weakness for horns, and a warm coolness. Dark, complex and almost avant garde. For all intents and purposes, a Lindenberg with Kafka-esque posing on a steamer, turned in the direction of the Ziller Valley. All three have a frugal consumption of a mere 4 liters per 100km, and there is still a healthy acceleration here that is lively and quick.








MARCEL DETTMANN

Dettmann Remixed 12"
Ostgut (OSTGUT 033EP)

In anticipation of Marcel Dettmann's debut full-length, Ostgut Ton presents a remix package of four original tracks, courtesy of Norman Nodge and Wincent Kunth. From the very first bar of Norman Nodge's remix of "Shift," an urgent, pumping charge of fizzing electricity is let loose, letting the arrangement simply flow. More raw energy powers also are throughout his remix of "Unrest." Taking a recognizably metallic Dettmann-forged synth pattern, Nodge's frenetic yet respectfully withheld structure guides you sure and steady through the smokescreen.

Listen to Unrest (Norman Nodge Remix):


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