Amoeblog

Watch Highlights from Bob Mould's Blistering Set at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Amoebite, September 4, 2014 03:15pm | Post a Comment

Bob Mould at Amoeba Hollywood

This summer Bob Mould stopped by Amoeba Hollywood to play a short but raucous set for a packed room. The singer-songwriter's musical career began in 1979 when he formed Husker Du, a legendary punk rock band that would influence the likes of the Pixies and Nirvana. After the dissolution of Hüsker Dü in the late 1980s, Mould started working on the material that would become Workbook, his first solo outing. In 1992, he formed the alternative rock band Sugar, which would become his most commercially successful project. Four years later, Mould returned to the stage as a solo artist once more.

Bob Mould Beauty and Ruin

In June 2014, Merge Records released his eleventh studio album, Beauty & Ruin, which led to appearances on Jimmy Kimmel Live, WTF with Marc Maron, and NPR's Tiny Desk Concerts. Mould performed to a packed house at Amoeba Hollywood on release day, tearing through songs at a fast and furious pace. You can see him live around the US, with opening band Cymbals and Guitars, before heading out to Europe and the UK later this fall.

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10 Records to Look For on Record Store Day

Posted by Billy Gil, April 11, 2014 06:05pm | Post a Comment

Record Store Day is coming our way Saturday April 19. You can already see what we have going on at Amoeba stores here, and this is a full list of titles that will be available that day. It’s a lot to parse through, so we’ve pulled a few highlights:

Joy Division An Ideal for Living (12”)

joy division record store dayWho wouldn’t want the first-ever Joy Division release? It includes remastered versions of the four songs originally included—“Warsaw,” “No Love Lost,” “Leaders of Men” and “Failures.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Husker DuCandy Apple Grey LP

husker du candy apple grey lp record store dayA totally awesome and underrated entry to the Husker Du canon. It was their major label debut, so the band’s fifth album got some flack from longtime fans, but revisiting it, Candy Apple Grey sounds as amazing as anything else they did, with songs like the immortal “Don’t Wanna Know If You Are Lonely.” The 1986 album helped set the tone for alternative rock to follow. It’s on grey vinyl for the first time.

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10 Bands We'd Like to See Reunite

Posted by Billy Gil, January 29, 2014 11:11am | Post a Comment

Two of our favorite bands of all time — OutKast and Slowdiveare officially reuniting. OutKast announced it a couple weeks back, with news that the Southern rap legends will headline Coachella and play Governernor’s Ball in New York, though it seems likely we’ll see another Big Boi album before a new OutKast album (and we’re OK with that!). Meanwhile, shoegaze titans Slowdive yesterday confirmed rumors (that they themselves flamed) that they’d reunite, playing Primavera in Barcelona in May and “a couple of gigs,” including a show at Village Underground in London May 19 (better book your tickets now!), in order to raise funds for a new LP.

With those two reunions locked down, we thought we’d turn our attention from bands we liked that reunited to bands we’d like to see reunite.

Talking Heads

talking heads amoebaThis one seems a no-brainer. They exactly been quiet since they first broke up in 1991, from briefly “reuniting” onstage in 2002 to play three songs for their Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction, to David Byrnes solo career (including a one-off album with St. Vincent), to the other members’ activity, including The Heads and Tom Tom Club. And the band seems more popular and prescient than ever. So, everyone’s still alive and working.

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Let's celebrate Minnesota!

Posted by Job O Brother, May 13, 2013 02:33pm | Post a Comment
Congratulations, ol' 32. You done good.









(In which we opine on the issue of Pride.)

Posted by Job O Brother, May 23, 2012 12:21pm | Post a Comment

pride flag


June is Pride Month, celebrating the LGBTel-em-el-oh-pee community past, present and future.

Writing on the subject is intimidating, because as someone who identifies with one of the letters in LGBT, the issues of equal rights feel raw, impassioned and profound. I am not an unbiased voice on the matter.

Growing up queer was almost indescribably difficult, and so much of who I am today was shaped by the negativity I experienced, not merely “often” – self-hate, fear and crippled self-esteem made it scary and gross for me every waking moment; thinking I needed to hide and obfuscate my unwanted inclinations meant that many of those I loved were kept from helping me, or even fully knowing me, which made for a special kind of awful loneliness.

In nearly every aspect of my life I see how I’m still "recovering" from being queer. For example: growing up, sports and physical fitness seemed like a test of manliness; I was so terrified of failing (which, I feared, would subsequently shine a light on my queerness) that exercise and playing outdoor games became something scary and intimidating, which in turn affected my fitness habits for life. It’s only in the last decade that I could drum up the courage to start exercising. This may sound ridiculous, but it really does cut that deep – that jogging around the block isn’t just something to get my heart-rate up, but something I’ve had to push myself to do in spite of a fear of being targeted for some form of ridicule. That’s just one example – there’s many more, equally pathetic and utterly unnecessary.

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