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57th Annual San Francisco International Film Festival, 4/24 - 5/8

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 7, 2014 03:54pm | Post a Comment

The San Francisco International Film Festival returns April 24th through May 8th! SFIFF showcases cinematic innovation and presents marquee premieres, international competitions, star-studded events, and live performances. This year’s music headliners are Thao and the Get Down Stay Down and Stephin Merritt (of The Magnetic Fields)! The program features 200 films of international distinction, including new work by Richard Linklater and so many others.

Amoeba is proud to co-present two music-related films at this year's festival about a couple of our most-beloved icons: 

20,000 Days on Earth (England, 2014, 95 min)
Investigating musician/writer/poet Nick Cave’s history, psyche, and creative path, 20,000 Days on Earth is a must-see for fans or anyone interested in an Artist’s journey. This highly stylized biopic presents a choreographed “day-in-the-life,” depicting Cave as an introspective and dark figure, and featuring his band the Bad Seeds’ own brand of controlled ferocity. 

Showing April 28th, 9:45pm at Sundance Kabuki Cinema and May 1st, 6:15pm at New People Cinema.

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Amoeba Sponsors the 12th Annual Indian Film Festival Los Angeles

Posted by Billy Gil, March 19, 2014 02:31pm | Post a Comment

Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles

It’s time for the12th annual Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles, taking place at the ArcLight Hollywood April 8-13. Amoeba is proud to be a sponsor once again!

The festival is devoted to Indian cinema and culture, and features critically acclaimed independent films from India, Bollywood kitsch, documentaries, film shorts and more. The IFFLA is showing 33 films in total this year. Fest passes are $100 for access to all screenings (excluding galas). Pick them up here. Individual screening passes are $14.

Check out all of the festival’s films and buy tickets here.

This year Amoeba presents the following films:

Writers (Sulemani Keeda)

Writers (Sulemani Keeda)

Thursday, April 10

9:15 p.m.

India/2013/90 min.

Sulemani Keeda, which means “pain in the ass” in Hindi street slang, is billed as a slacker bromantic comedy. Two writing partners want to shake up Bollywood but instead get rejected by producers and spend their time hitting on girls at bookstores and poetry slams. Things change when a drug-addled son of a B-movie producer hires them to write a salacious arthouse film. One of the writers meets a beautiful photographer, making him question his choice to sell out. Director Amit V Masurkar casts his friends in the film and shoots guerrilla style to keep things real.

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Hollywood Strikes Back: The Imperial '80's at Other Cinema in SF, 3/29

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 10, 2014 07:32pm | Post a Comment

christian divine hollywood strikes back other cinema imperial 80s

Prepare to go back in time and experience (or, for most of us, re-live) the roots of modern American values. Psychotronic cinema wizard Christian Divine presents Hollywood Strikes Back: The Imperial '80's -- a mesmerizing clip show at Other Cinema (ATA Gallery, 992 Valencia) on March 29th -- that delves into the icons and iconography of the 1980s.

With the 1980 election of Ronald Reagan, Hollywood exited the New Seventies Cinema for a "State of the Art" genre that sub-texted jingoism and imperialism -- powdered with the cocaine of Capitalism ronald reagan time magazineand edited to the video beat of MTV. Christian Divine takes a Cult Studies approach to the industry products that became emblems of the era. From masked slashers to weird science, this clip show will weave a thematic narrative of the pop-neon decade, exposing the colonialism of Raiders of the Lost Ark, the Cold War propaganda of Top Gun, the entitled teen world of Ferris Bueller's Day Off, the proto-revolutionary realms of Star Wars, and so much more! Come early for cheap '80s cocktails. Andre Perkowski's mash-up of Orson Welles movie lore will kick off our Hollywood review.

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Fantasy March: Campaigning for Genre Awareness

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, March 10, 2014 02:20pm | Post a Comment
amoeba music san francisco fantasy film cinema movie endcap trend trendcap magic knights wizards princess damsel fairy tale legend dungeons dragons game of thrones warfaring strangers darkscorch canticlesbootleg movie poster conan the destroyer ghana africa arnold grace jones fantasy magic comic book hero film adaptation

This month at Amoeba SF we're forging a fellowship for Fantasy genre awareness and appreciation! Given the recent release of Numero Group's most excellent "one comp. to rule them all" collection of Dungeons & Dragons inspired pre-Heavy Metal underground Rock, Warfaring Strangers: Darkscorch Canticles, and the impending Game of Thrones hype-a-thon building up to the premiere of the HBO show's fourth season on April 6th, we figured the month of March could do for a heady dose of Ice and Fire-fueled cinematic dream-fasting -- a visual poultice with which the reality-weary may allay their workaday woes, watching. Do keep an vigilant eye out for our Fantasy endcap at Amoeba SF featuring golden genre gems like these from the nineteen-eighties:
 

dragonslayer fantasy film 1981

Dragonslayer (1981) in which a young wizard's apprentice (Peter MacNichol of Ally McBeal and Ghostbusters 2 fame) must kill a virgin-snacking dragon to save the King's daughter who has been chosen by the kingdom's lottery system as the next sacrifice in line to keep the beast's appetite for destruction at bay.

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Nothing But a Man, a Film Review by Aiah Samba

Posted by Amoebite, January 27, 2014 12:10pm | Post a Comment

"They don't sound human, do they?" - Duff Anderson

When I was a kid, movies took up a big slice of my daily routine. I was an introverted introvert with nary a friend to call my own. Pop's wasn't around so that left my mom, sister and our RCA television to raise me. I was devouring movies at such an alarming rate my mother began to worry. But that's what mothers do; they worry about their children - especially African mothers. (How will she ever get a grandchild from someone who prays to a TV set?) By the time I was seventeen, I was a self-proclaimed film buff. (Not like I had anything else going for me.) I openly mocked peers with my cinema prowess, brandishing pithy one-liners and pop culture references to put them in their place. But one of those underlings asked an interesting question: "What was my favorite film on African American life?" It made me ponder how much Black cinema I've actually seen. The answer startled me. Now, outside of John Singleton, the Hughes Brothers, some Blaxploitation movies and the occasional Spike Lee joint, there weren't that many I was exposed to. I blamed it on the fact that compared to others, African American movies were far and few between. Heck, I saw more movies from Alfred Hitchcock than all the directors I named above combined. But that was lazy and actually quite inaccurate. There was plenty of gold to be had. So I started to dig. 

Nothing But a Man

Nothing But A Man was one of those gems I discovered. Now this may come off as hyperbolical fluff but I honestly believe this is not only one of the best films on African American life, but American life, period. I never liked the distinction between the two anyway. It's rare to see a film on this subject handled with such tact and elegance - a quiet, sensitive piece with the delicacy and finesse of a Swiss watch.

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