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Music Monday Screenings at the New Mission Theater in SF

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 27, 2016 07:04pm | Post a Comment

Music Monday at the New Mission Theater, San Francisco

From Kenneth Anger to anonymous YouTubers, film and moving pictures have maintained and nurtured Medicine for Melancholya mutually beneficial relationship for eons. Sometimes it’s a documentary about a long-lost icon, or a legendary concert film, or a movie that uses music to hammer home what its trying to say – Music Monday at the New Mission Theater in SF is a weekly series here to bring you fun, rare, important, new, old, or otherwise kaleidoscopic films linked to the world of music. This December, catch two very special Music Monday titles: Medicine for Melancholy on December 5th at 9:15pm and Gimme Danger on December 12th at 10pm.

Medicine for Melancholy is the first feature film by Bay Area director Barry Jenkins, who made waves earlier this year in the indie film world with his latest work, Moonlight. Medicine for Melancholy explores issues such as race, identity, gentrification, and personal politics from the perspective of two San Francisco locals. From a drunken Soul Night at the Knockout to a heart-stoppingly apropos soundtrack by the likes of Casiotone For The Painfully Alone, Au Revoir Simone, and more, Medicine for Melancholy is a visually and sonically powerful portrait of a city that doesn’t really exist anymore. Tickets available HERE.

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The Witch: A New England Folktale and Why You Need to Own It on DVD or Blu-ray

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 20, 2016 04:49pm | Post a Comment

The Witch

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show


Did you ever try to hex your Algebra II teacher in high school the night before the final? Have you The Witchwatched the "Salem Witches" episode of In Search Of while sipping red wine from a black Madonna Inn goblet? Is your email password Pyewacket13? If your answer is yes to any of these and you have not yet seen The Witch: A New England Folktale (out now on DVD & Blu-ray), see it. If your answer is no but supernatural historical period horror films are your “jam,” see it.

Normally, I’m more into old school witch flicks, like City of the Dead (1960), Night of the Eagle (1962), and The Witches (1966), but The Witch is well done…just like my King Henry VIII steak at the House of Prime Rib. By the beard of Black Phillip the billy goat, when you watch this you will soon find yourself in an eerie trance in front of your boob-tube, being pulled into the dark and mysterious New England woods in the 17th century. If M. Night Shyamalan’s The Village (2004) and Avery Crounse's Eyes of Fire (1983) had a new little baby sister, it would be The Witch. (Eyes of Fire, if you can find on VHS somewhere, is totally spooksville too! View the trailer HERE.)

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SF Silent Film Festival's A Day of Silents, December 3

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 14, 2016 04:49pm | Post a Comment

SF Silent Film Festival Day of Silents

Launch into the holiday season with San Francisco Silent Film Festival's event A Day of Silents on Saturday, December 3rd at the glorious Castro Theatre. In one epic day, the SFSFF offers six amazing programs with live musical accompaniment by Alloy Orchestra and Donald Sosin!

The silent hits just keep coming as the day kicks off at 10am with a program of Charlie Chaplin shorts Charlie Chaplinmade with the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company in 1915. Then at 12:15pm, Ernst Lubitsch’s 1926 comedy So This Is Paris roars across the screen to live musical accompaniment by Donald Sosin. Sergei Eisenstein’s first full-length feature, Strike (1925), screens at 2:15pm with Alloy Orchestra providing powerful musical accompaniment. At 4:45pm, catch Different From the Others (1919), possibly the oldest surviving film with a homosexual protagonist, which has been restored by the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project. Josef von Sternberg’s The Last Command (1928), about an exiled Russian general who "goes Hollywood," plays at 7pm with music by Alloy Orchestra. The last film of the night brings Gloria Swanson to the screen for Sadie Thompson, the 1928 drama about a San Franciscan prostitute on the island of Pago Pago, at 9:15pm.

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Five Supernatural-Supreme Flicks for All Hallows' Eve

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 28, 2016 04:55pm | Post a Comment

7 Faces of Dr. Lao

-- By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show


Tis’ the season for kicking your feet up on the thrift store ottoman, sipping a small glass of slightly chilled port, and sniffing the pumpkin seeds burning in the oven while watching a spooky-mooky old flick on the tube. Here are my humble suggestions of five “fine” viewing pleasures that one may acquire in the glorious horror movie aisle of your favorite music store.

The Gorgon (1964), Directed by Terence Fisher
The GorgonHey, wait…those aren’t green dreadlocks?!
Set in the year 1910, a Gorgon decides to take a lil’ vacation from Greece and hangs out in an abandoned castle of a small German village where she gets her kicks getting the locals “stoned.” Can the Scooby Doo super-duo of Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing defeat this reptilian-haired problem? I mean really, these guys can pretty much defeat anything…including each other.

Here is a quote from the film that I plan on using the next time my Uncle Fred (who practices astral-projection in Mexico) pokes fun at me for my love of collecting Bigfoot tracks and ghost hunting...

Dr. Namaroff (aka my Uncle Fred): “We are men of science. I don't believe in ghosts or evil spirits, and I don't think you do either.” 

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A Super Shangri-La Show Spectacular Halloween Double Feature, October 28

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 26, 2016 06:34pm | Post a Comment

William Castle, 13 Ghosts

-- By Brett Stillo

Halloween weekend is upon us, and what better way to start things off than with a cinematic ghost hunt in an old, haunted San Francisco theater.

The Super Shangri-La Show, hosted by the intrepid Kai Wada Roath, is more than a movie night atHouse your neighborhood theater. It is an exploration of the uncanny through the medium of cinema. Week after week, Roath takes his audience on a quest for myths, monsters, witchcraft, and lost civilizations inside a haunted movie theater -- the historic Balboa Theatre in the Outer Richmond. The Super Shangri-La Show is like a live-action version of the old Leonard Nimoy television program In Search Of, with Roath acting as a paranormal guide through a lost world of Drive-In and B-Movie monstrosities such as The Legend of Bogey Creek, The Devil’s Rain, Atlantis: The Lost Continent, and The Legend of Hell House, just to name a few.

Friday night’s double feature offers an ectoplasmic spectrum of haunted house stories. 13 Ghosts is a classic 1950’s spook show courtesy of legendary showman William Castle. Castle was notorious for the outrageously wacky gimmicks he built into his movies and 13 Ghosts is no exception. When the film was released in 1960, audience members were issued special filtered “ghost goggles” to view the cinematic poltergeists on the big screen thanks to a Castle-contrived process called “Illusion-O!”

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