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Summer Book Blockbusters: New & Upcoming Reads

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 12, 2016 06:10pm | Post a Comment

Summer Book Blockbusters

We still have plenty of summer left this year, which is good news for sun worshipers, stone fruit enthusiasts, and voracious readers. Thanks to summer, we can participate in our favorite solitary hobby of being completely absorbed by a good book in the great outdoors -- and we can do so longer and later thanks to daylight savings time! So many great books have come out this summer or are on their way to bookshelves near you. Here's our guide to some of the highlights we've enjoyed and are looking forward to.

Never A Dull Moment: 1971 The Year That Rock ExplodedMusic:

Kanye West Owes Me $300: And Other True Stories from a White Rapper Who Almost Made It Big by Jensen Karp (out now)
This is the hilarious and true story of Jensen Karp's wild ride as "Hot Karl," the most famous white rapper you've never heard of, who got his start performing at his friend's bar mitzvah and eventually signed to Interscope Records.

Never a Dull Moment: 1971 The Year That Rock Exploded by David Hepworth (out now)
Examines the music scene starting with the day after The Beatles broke up and the world was reshaped by David Bowie, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, and Joni Mitchell.

In Love With These Times by Roger Shepherd (out now)
Flying Nun Records founder Roger Shepherd's memoirs reach back to the early days of the New Zealand label, dreamt up in the back rooms of a Christchurch record shop in the early '80s.

The Smiths by Nalinee Darmrong (out now)
This huge collection of photos by Nalinee Darmrong chronicles The Smiths during their peak years, 1985–1986, when Darmrong traveled with the band for the Meat Is Murder and The Queen Is Dead tours. See many previously unpublished photos of the band backstage and onstage, set lists, handcrafted promo materials, letters, clothing, and much more.

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Summer Nights at Oakland Museum of California, Fri. 7/27! Daniel Clowes, Chris Ware, & Hippies Too!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 12, 2012 03:00pm | Post a Comment
Summer Nights Oakland Museum OMCA

 

Join Amoeba Music and the Oakland Museum of California for another action-packed installment of Summer Nights at OMCA on Friday, July 27th!


Held on the final Friday of each month from Friday, April 27 through Friday, October 26, Summer NightsRevolution hippies haight san francisco features special evening hours and half-price Museum admission after 5pm! With classic '68 film screenings in Oak Street Plaza, Amoeba Music DJs spinning '60s-inspired sets, and sizzling special activities throughout the Museum, you won't want to miss Summer Nights!

On Friday, July 27th, Amoeba's own DJ Michael Henning will be spinning international and psychedelic gems of the era and you can watch this classic 1968 film under the stars at Oak Street Plaza:

Revolution
Starring Herb Caen and featuring interviews and performances by Country Joe & the Fish, Quicksilver Messenger Service, and the Steve Miller Band.

Obscured by Clowes

Posted by Charles Reece, June 1, 2012 02:59pm | Post a Comment
daniel clowes self-portrait sketch
One of my favorite cartoonists was on Michael Krasny's Forum last Wednesday. Listen below:

Giving up the Ghost: Ghost World

Posted by Charles Reece, April 15, 2012 11:57pm | Post a Comment
john barth end of the road   ghost world enid

[This essay originally appeared as part of a roundtable over at The Hooded Utilitarian.]

Reading Daniel Clowes' Ghost World again got me to thinking about John Barth’s nihilist novel, The End of the Road. The latter begins at a bus station; the former ends at a bus stop. And much like Barth’s protagonist, Jacob Horner, Enid spends the duration of the story searching for an identity, but only succeeds in finding what she’s not. Horner is a middle-aged academic type who’s managed to think himself into a hole, not seeing any potential action as better grounded than another -- sort of an infinite regress of self. Thus, he’s sitting in a bus station in a state of existential paralysis, not able to even come up with a good reason to get on a bus and leave his former (non-) life behind. The abiding gloom that pervades all of Ghost World's vignettes -- undercutting Enid’s hipper-than-thou detachment from those around her -- is a sense that she’s headed to the same destination as Horner: nowhere.

I figure there must be some consilience here, since kinukitty’s main reason for not liking Clowes’ book -- that it’s neither real nor funny -- reminds me of Barth’s prefatory defense of his story:

Jacob Horner […] embodies my conviction that one may reach such a degree of self-estrangement as to feel no coherent antecedent for the first-person-singular pronoun. […] If the reader regards [this] egregious [condition] (as embodied by the [narrator]) as merely psychopathological -- that is, as symptomatic rather than emblematic -- the [novel] make[s] no moral-dramatic sense. [p. viii]

I realize that if one has to defend something as funny, it’s never going to make it so to those not laughing. This is particularly true of existentialist humor, since it’s kind of the obverse of prat falls, namely only funny when it happens to me. So I’m going to stick to the reality of Enid’s predicament. The End of the Road is a bit abstract, where Horner goes through a series of fanciful psychotherapeutic treatments in search of a cure (the search is, of course, at the insistence of a psychiatrist). The most relevant of these is mythotherapy, which involves acting in a chosen character role with the purpose of having it stick ghost world enid beckythrough habituation -- an irrational solution to a rational psychosis. Clowes treats the identity formation of teenagers in much the same way, but with a recognizant teen who, like Horner, can’t ignore the ontological arbitrariness undergirding the whole process. Just because teens regularly slip into an adult role without much of a hitch doesn’t mean that there’s not a good deal of truth in her depicted inertia.

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Daniel Clowes' Long Overdue Career Retrospective "Modern Cartoonist" Opens At OMCA This Weekend

Posted by Billyjam, April 12, 2012 09:20pm | Post a Comment
Despite his deep resume and extensive, impressive body of work, revered & highly accomplished Chicago born, Oakland based graphic novelist Daniel Clowes, whose work is defined by its dark humored focus on the underdog, is finally getting the kind of exposure he has long deserved but for some reason eluded - until now.

That successful & prolific career spans two-plus decades in the alternative comic book arts world racking up such accolades as several prestigious Harvey Awards for his pioneering comic Eightball, his work appearing in the New Yorker, a 2011 PEN career achievement award for the darkly fun The Death-Ray (about an orphaned teen named Andy who discovers that, when he smokes cigarettes, he morphs into a superhero with special powers), plus the 2001 Oscar nomination for the film adaptation of his book Ghost World.

Six years ago his Art School Confidential was adapted to film and reportedly a film version of his book Wilson is currently in the works. But it is only now in 2012 that Daniel Clowes is finally getting his due with a large scale retrospective of his life's work at the Oakland Museum of California (OMCA) that opens this weekend and runs there for four months.

With the exception of a (smaller scale compared to OMCA) solo show that Los Angeles' Richard Heller Gallery hosted for Clowes nine years ago, this OMCA retrospective will be Clowes first large scale, major museum exhibition focusing solely on his art and in great depth. Titled Modern Cartoonist, it opens this Saturday (April 14th) and runs through August 12th and will exhibit one hundred different pieces of the artist's work spanning the past 23 years.

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